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  #46   ^
Old Wed, Jul-11-18, 07:21
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Makes sense doesnt it??? ANd simple , for us lowcarbers.

Of the several articles addresssing this, the low carb diet was vewed as not do-able for the population, so just a few days here and there of fasting for the treatment days was deemed do-abe.

I think I would rather live LC than eat SAD then fast/radiation/chemo to kill the cancers.

Sugars feed the buggers; AND high O2 levels also disrupt the ccancer cells......I am looking for evidence that exercise may be helpdul to increase O2.

Certainly there is evidence that sleep apnea is a problem and linked to some diseases.
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  #47   ^
Old Wed, Jul-11-18, 08:45
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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How we train our thinking changes our experience.....why cholesterol decreasing drugs cause depression......and so much more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kVEsKRslQw
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  #48   ^
Old Wed, Jul-11-18, 09:31
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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http://paleoforwomen.com/4-dangerou...ut-chia-seeds/#


This is paleowoman, and offers a great write up on chia seeds. SHe hits upon every point that I have delved into about the chia seeds. However, I did find one source that looks at the phytoestrogens as BLOCKERS to the detrimental estrogents. Contradictory info is hard to sort out without good studies to verify one way or another. NOT taking the phystoestrogens is as valid as TAKING the phytoestrogens.

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4 Dangerous Myths About Chia Seeds
by Stefani Ruper | Nov 5, 2015 | Food, Hormones | 43 comments

4 Dangerous Myths About Chia Seeds
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“Dangerous” may be a strong word – consuming chia seeds occasionally should be just fine – but I think the strong language I chose for the title of this post is actually appropriate. It enables me to demonstrate how serious a problem this is.

Chia seeds have become a buzz food. They are increasingly popular in health food stores, co-ops, smoothies, and high-end yuppie dinner parties.

Chia seeds are celebrated for their numerous, miraculous health powers. They are exalted – so the acolytes say – because of their high nutrient content, their high omega 3 content, their high fiber and protein content, and their ‘hormone balancing effects.’

Yet all of these claims end up being erroneous at best and actively harmful at worst.

Here are the myths in detail, and what you need to know about them:

Myth 1) Chia seeds have high nutrient content

At first glance, chia seeds seem fantastic.

They are high in

Calcium: 18% of the RDA.
Manganese: 30% of the RDA.
Magnesium: 30% of the RDA.
Phosphorus: 27% of the RDA.
If true, this would be awesome, especially because it is very hard to get enough magnesium in the diet.

Chia seeds also contain significant amounts of

Zinc
Vitamin B3
Vitamin B1
And Vitamin B6.
However.

Chia seeds contain numerous phytochemicals (sometimes called antinutrients) which reduce their nutritional value. Chia seeds are concentrated sources of phytate which binds the exact minerals everyone is so excited about chia seeds having: calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and copper, to name a few.

When antinutrients bind to these minerals, they can not be absorbed by the body. Instead, they are flushed out of the digestive track along with the rest of the body’s waste.


Antinutrients can also bind with minerals found in other foods – so if you eat chia seeds with your salad or with a steak, you will steal nutrients from them, too.

Additionally, chia seeds are said to be high in some B vitamins, including B6. Yet absorption of plant-based B6 by the body is very difficult. B6 is very easily absorbed from animal sources – but plant sources of B6 are somewhat of a myth and should be discarded.

In short – chia seeds’ nutritional value is a myth. Not only are their own nutrients not bioavailable, but they can rob your body of nutrients from other foods as well.

Myth 2) Chia seeds are high in omega 3 fatty acids

This is an important myth. It applies to chia seeds, yet it also applies to flax as well.

Whenever a plant is called “high in omega 3” I encourage extreme caution.

This is because plant-based omega 3 fats are a form of omega 3 called ALA.

However, the most important forms of omega 3 fats for the body are EPA and DHA. Those can only be found in animal products, particularly in fatty fish like salmon or sardines, or in high quality supplements like fermented cod liver oil. The body can convert ALA to EPA and DHA, but at very low conversion rates.

Now you might think that that’s just fine – you can load up a ton on ALA (though you’d need nearly 100x the amount of fish you’d need to eat) and just let your body convert it all.

But that would be a very unhealthy choice.

It is important for the body to have some omega 3 fat. It needs to balance omega 3 and 6 fats in order to support a healthy amount of inflammation and immune activity in the body. The ratio of 3:6 fats should be approximately 1:2.

YET because these omega 3 and 6 fats are a class of fats called poly unsaturated fatty acids, they are highly reactive (the less saturated a fat is, the more reactive it is). Being highly reactive means that they can oxidize in your body, which causes aging, inflammation, and tissue damage.

So you need a balance of omega 3 and 6 fats, but your total consumption of these kinds of fats should be quite low.

Chia seeds, containing all ALA and no EPA or DHA, therefore, I think are quite an unhealthy food. They unnecessarily add a poly unsaturated, highly oxidized load to your body without any of the important anti-inflammatory benefits of EPA and DHA.

Some chia seeds here and there of course will not hurt – but they should by no means constitute a significant portion of your diet, and especially not be considered a quality substitute for fatty fish.

Myth 3) Chia seeds are high in fiber and protein

Yes, chia seeds are high in fiber. Yet fiber is overrated. Why do you need fiber? To bulk up your stool? If you have a healthy gut flora population, this should not be a problem. Seriously. There are many health conditions that may cause constipation, too, but none of them are fixed by a high fiber diet. Fiber may act as a short-term, quick fix for better waste elimination, but it is by no means a solution to the problem.

You get all the fiber you need from having a few servings of vegetables and fruits each day.

In fact, too much insoluble fiber, which chia seeds have, can be abrasive in the gut and colon and actually contribute to inflammation and inflammatory bowel conditions like ulcerative colitis.

Moreover, chia seeds do have some protein in them, but it is “incomplete protein.”

Being “incomplete” means that the protein source does not contain all of the amino acids the body actually needs. The only “complete” sources of protein are animal products – each and every one of them is complete – and the unique case of quinoa. No other plant source is “complete” protein.

Now, being “incomplete” is not necessarily a bad thing. It is fine to be incomplete – the amino acids that are present in chia seeds can still be utilized by your body.

But if chia seeds constituted 100% of your protein intake, you would be in serious trouble. Vegetarians need to be very careful about where they get their protein from, and need to combine different plant proteins in their meals. This is the only way to assure that they get all the amino acids the body needs.

4) Hormone balance

Soy, flax, and chia seeds are the most hormonal of foods. In particularly they contain a heavy dose of lignans, a type of plant estrogen.

Now, the estrogen found in chia seeds is still minimal compared to the body’s normal estrogen production – assuming healthy estrogen production – but repeated exposure over time can have real effects.

Not only can overdosing on phytoestrogenic foods cause estrogen-dominant problems like PMS, endometriosis, mood swings, weight gain, and depression (I personally get very depressed when I consume phytoestrogens), but they are being investigated for any influence they may have on female cancers such as breast cancer and uterine cancer. The jury is still out on whether they have an effect, but that should be telling in and of itself, as the debate has been raging in the nutrition and cancer research communities for years.

Unfortunately I cannot make blanket recommendations regarding phytoestrogens. Generally I think the safest bet is to avoid them, so as to allow for the most natural hormone levels and production in the body as possible – but each woman responds different to them. However, some women can benefit from phytoestrogen supplementation, such as if you are going through menopause. It could really help with symptoms. In that case, I do recommend gently experimenting with phytoestrogens.

I generally recommend starting with a lower-level dose like a bowl of chickpeas a day, instead of a tablespoon of flax, but I make that recommendation for women who have very sensitive hormone systems.If you think you have a more robust system then experimenting with chia supplementation may really be able to help you.

To find out the phytoestrogen content of various foods, check out this post.



Chia myths…

So these are the reasons I really, genuinely, strongly dislike the popularity of chia seeds.

I don’t eat chia seeds. I do not treat them like poison. They are not great, certainly, and I am wary of estrogen dominance symptoms which can happen to me quite easily, but they are not poison either. They are simply a food.

Chia seeds have a small degree of nutritional value, and some fiber and protein, which is fine. But so far as being a panacea for health issues, I’ll take a pass.

I will instead stick to my….

bountiful fruits and vegetables,

high quality coconut oil,

butter,

ghee,

olive oil,

organ meats once or twice a month (here’s a liver supplement in case you do not like to eat liver,

pasture-raised eggs,

daily fermented foods (here are my favorites),

sunlight,

wild-caught fatty fish like salmon or sardines twice a week, and

the rockstar supplement cod liver oil which is rich in fat-soluble vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA.
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  #49   ^
Old Wed, Jul-11-18, 17:15
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walnut walnut is offline
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The whole thing about phytoestrogens and estrogen makes my head spin sometimes. I'm about to lose my ovaries to radiation and I'll go right into menopause. I have some female relatives who have had estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer so I just can't get too excited about losing my estrogen. A lot of the menopause literature recommends soya Etc as a natural replacement for the Lost estrogen. I just don't think I could ever.

If you listen to podcasts you might like Paul Anderson. He's co-author of a new book called outside the box cancer Therapies . In one of his podcasts he said that the people who stay on low-carb have the best remission rates of their cancers.

Medicine and Health with Dr Paul https://player.fm/series/medicine-a...th-with-dr-paul

The BC Cancer Foundation has been running some blog posts by a researcher who has been researching low carb diet and cancer. they got slammed pretty bad on Twitter by a bunch of idiots and they haven't finished the blog series.

https://bccancerfoundation.com/rese...r-gerry-krystal
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  #50   ^
Old Wed, Jul-11-18, 17:29
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Hi walnut, thanks for the visit.

Cancer is an emotional word. Replacement therapy is also an emotional word.

I elected to remove my ovaries, but totally regret it now. All the info available at the time was from mainstream conventional doctors. Nothing else was easy to find. SO I did nt find out there ARE alternative treatments and options.

I hate my life as it is. Wish I had all my hormones back. Can only get natural options. Genetic testing? Nope, never again.
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  #51   ^
Old Thu, Jul-12-18, 20:27
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28079011



Quote:
Format: AbstractSend to
Curr Protein Pept Sci. 2018;19(3):323-332. doi: 10.2174/1389203718666170111121255.
Molecular Mechanisms of Anticancer Effects of Phytoestrogens in Breast Cancer.
Hsieh CJ1, Hsu YL2, Huang YF1, Tsai EM2.

Abstract
Phytoestrogens derived from plants exert estrogenic as well as antiestrogenic effects and multiple actions within breast cancer cells. Chemopreventive properties of phytoestrogens have emerged from epidemiological observations. In recent clinical research studies, phytoestrogens are safe and may even protect against breast cancer. In this brief review, the molecular mechanisms of phytoestrogens on regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, estrogen receptors, cell signaling pathways, and epigenetic modulations in relation to breast cancer are discussed. Phytoestrogens have a preferential affinity for estrogen receptor (ER)-β, which appears to be associated with antiproliferative and anticarcinogenic effects. Moreover, while phytoestrogens not only inhibit ER-positive but also ER-negative breast cancer cells, the possibility of epigenetic modulation playing an important role is also discussed. In conclusion, as there are multiple targets and actions of phytoestrogens, extensive research is still necessary. However, due to low toxicity, low cost, and easy availability, their potent chemoprevention effects deserve further study.
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  #52   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 11:15
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Fiber-- In my mind I had put this subject to bed. COnvinced myself that eating vegeatables was enough fiber and certainly enough minerals and vitamins for a healthy body and GI.

THen fell across this blog. I chuckled. He confirmed my thoughts but arrived at this conclusion much faster than I did.

He kicked the grains out, and eliminated the IBS at the same time.

https://www.marksdailyapple.com/why...-are-unhealthy/
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  #53   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 11:17
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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https://www.drstevenlin.com/what-ar...-of-vitamin-k2/

Collecting recipes for pate.....time to butcher the ducks.....just picturing the huge duck livers in the drakes.......
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  #54   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 12:04
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Great article. I liked the part about sticks and twigs.
" So when all those sticks and twigs rub up against my fleshy interior and literally rupture my intestinal lining, I’ve got nothing to worry about. It’s all part of the plan, right?"
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  #55   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 12:26
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
https://www.drstevenlin.com/what-ar...-of-vitamin-k2/

Collecting recipes for pate.....time to butcher the ducks.....just picturing the huge duck livers in the drakes.......


Here are a couple of good pate recipes using pork but could be used for duck liver.
Link is Courtesy of Jenny a couple of years ago.
http://delectablemusings.com/2012/0...e-two-ways.html
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  #56   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 12:53
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Thanks Meme, dang the live pate looks great. Time to get brandy!!! Ran out of it years ago when I stopped making rum balls and brandy balls. Only kept that stuff around for cooking. Now a NEW recipe for that brandy!!

Pork Liver Pâté Mousse


by Michelle K. March-15-2012

This liver pâté mousse works great with chicken and beef livers as well if you do not care for or do not have pork livers on hand.

Ingredients
1 lb 8 oz pork liver
4 Tbs butter
1 tsp oil
2 onions, cut in half and then thinly sliced
1 tsp kosher salt
4 garlic cloves, minced
1/8 - 1/4 cup brandy
1/4 - 1/2 cup cream
1 tsp black pepper



Instructions

Carefully clean the pork liver, being sure you remove any connective tissue.

Dice the liver into 1 inch cubes. Add the cleaned liver to a bowl and then cover it with milk. Move it to the refrigerator for at least an hour.

Melt the butter and oil in a skillet and add the onions. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and cook the onions low and slow until they reach a rich caramel color. This process takes a while and cannot be rushed. The more sugars that develop and the deeper the color of the onions the better they will taste.

Add the garlic to the caramelized onions and stir for about a minute. Add in the liver cubes to the skillet by removing them from the milk - do not pour them into the skillet milk and all. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and fresh ground pepper then heat gently until the juice coming out of the livers is clear and they are fully cooked.

Carefully add the entire contents of the skillet to your food processor. Add in 1/8 cup of brandy and 1/4 cup of cream. Puree for several minutes, stopping to scrape the sides as needed.

Taste the pâté and adjust the cream, brandy, salt and pepper to your personal tastes. Puree one last time getting everything very smooth.

Using a fine mesh sieve and wooden spoon or spatula, push the puree through to get rid of the grainy texture. This last step is tedious but the difference in the final pâté makes it well worth it.

Traditionally this is not served until it has a chance to chill for several hours or overnight, but I like it warm. So eat it whenever you want on crisp crackers or rustic bread.

Store in an air tight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. For longer storage move the pâté to a freezer safe container and cover the top with a layer of clarified butter. Freeze for up to 6 months. Let it thaw in the refrigerator the day before using.

Details
Prep time: 10 mins
Cook time: 1 hour
Total time: 1 hour 10 mins
Yield: about 3 cups
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  #57   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 13:02
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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To me, the cloves and onions might overpower the duck liver but do well with pork.
I liked the other one better

Ingredients
•1 lb 6 oz course ground pork shoulder or (Duck liver)
•6 oz pork liver
•1/2 cup dry white wine
•2 tsp pink salt
•1 tsp black pepper
•1/4 tsp marjoram
•3 small bay leaves

I would also use Thyme because it's a French thing....I'm not so crazy about marjoram.

But I would probably love both as is and eat it all
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  #58   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 13:05
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
To me, the cloves and onions might overpower the duck liver but do well with pork.
I liked the other one better

Ingredients
•1 lb 6 oz course ground pork shoulder or (Duck liver)
•6 oz pork liver
•1/2 cup dry white wine
•2 tsp pink salt
•1 tsp black pepper
•1/4 tsp marjoram
•3 small bay leaves

I would also use Thyme because it's a French thing....I'm not so crazy about marjoram.

But I would probably love both as is and eat it all



I just assumed the first one MUST use ground pork. Yes you are right this would be a good one.

MAYBE there will be enough liver over the summer to make both and trial the recipes.
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  #59   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 13:07
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Need to turn the lobster shells into a soup. WIll try cream and water to pull out the flavors.... and make more space in the freezer for the the ducks.
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  #60   ^
Old Mon, Jul-16-18, 13:45
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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So much talk about the livers I totally forgot about your whole ducks, you lucky duck!! That's my fav meat ever!! I would bet that's a ton of work, never done or seen it done but I can imagine. The one time DD3 raised chickens in FFA for meat, DH took them to a place for processing. They have a system and even a machine that removes the feathers.
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