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  #1666   ^
Old Sun, Sep-03-17, 08:55
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,621
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Supplementing Breakfast with a Vitamin D and Leucine-Enriched Whey Protein Medical Nutrition Drink Enhances Postprandial Muscle Protein Synthesis and Muscle Mass in Healthy Older Men.
Chanet A1, Verlaan S2,3, Salles J1, Giraudet C1, Patrac V1, Pidou V4, Pouyet C5, Hafnaoui N1, Blot A4, Cano N4,6, Farigon N6, Bongers A2, Jourdan M2, Luiking Y2, Walrand S1, Boirie Y7,6.
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Abstract
Background: A promising strategy to help older adults preserve or build muscle mass is to optimize muscle anabolism through providing an adequate amount of high-quality protein at each meal.Objective: This "proof of principle" study investigated the acute effect of supplementing breakfast with a vitamin D and leucine-enriched whey protein medical nutrition drink on postprandial muscle protein synthesis and longer-term effect on muscle mass in healthy older adults.Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted in 24 healthy older men [mean SD: age 71 4 y; body mass index (in kg/m2) 24.7 2.8] between September 2012 and October 2013 at the Unit of Human Nutrition, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Participants received a medical nutrition drink [test group; 21 g leucine-enriched whey protein, 9 g carbohydrates, 3 g fat, 800 IU cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), and 628 kJ] or a noncaloric placebo (control group) before breakfast for 6 wk. Mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was measured at week 0 in the basal and postprandial state, after study product intake with a standardized breakfast with the use of l-[2H5]-phenylalanine tracer methodology. The longer-term effect of the medical nutrition drink was evaluated by measurement of appendicular lean mass, representing skeletal muscle mass at weeks 0 and 6, by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.Results: Postprandial FSR (0-240 min) was higher in the test group than in the control group [estimate of difference (ED): 0.022%/h; 95% CI: 0.010%/h, 0.035%/h; ANCOVA, P = 0.001]. The test group gained more appendicular lean mass than the control group after 6 wk (ED: 0.37 kg; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.72 kg; ANCOVA, P = 0.035), predominantly as leg lean mass (ED: 0.30 kg; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.57 kg; ANCOVA, P = 0.034).Conclusions: Supplementing breakfast with a vitamin D and leucine-enriched whey protein medical nutrition drink stimulated postprandial muscle protein synthesis and increased muscle mass after 6 wk of intervention in healthy older adults and may therefore be a way to support muscle preservation in older people. This trial was registered at www.trialregister.nl as NTR3471.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28835387
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  #1667   ^
Old Sun, Sep-03-17, 08:57
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,621
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Vitamin D supplementation in cutaneous malignant melanoma outcome (ViDMe): a randomized controlled trial.
De Smedt J1,2, Van Kelst S3,4, Boecxstaens V5,6, Stas M5,6, Bogaerts K7,8, Vanderschueren D9,10, Aura C11,12, Vandenberghe K13, Lambrechts D14,15, Wolter P16, Bechter O17,18, Nikkels A19, Strobbe T20, Emri G21, Marasigan V3,4, Garmyn M3,4.
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Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Previous studies have investigated the protective effect of vitamin D serum levels, at diagnosis and during the follow-up period after treatment, on melanoma outcome. In the present study we assess whether vitamin D supplementation, in the follow-up period after diagnosis and surgical resection of the primary tumor, has a protective effect on relapse of cutaneous malignant melanoma and whether this protective effect correlates with vitamin D levels in serum and Vitamin D Receptor immunoreactivity in the primary tumor.
METHODS/DESIGN:
This study is a multicenter randomized double blind placebo- controlled phase III trial. Patients between the age of 18 and 80~years diagnosed and treated surgically for a melanoma stage IB-III are eligible for randomization in a 1:1 ratio to active treatment or placebo. The study drug is taken each month and consists of either 100,000 International Unit cholecalciferol or arachidis oleum raffinatum used as a placebo. The primary endpoint is relapse free survival. The secondary endpoints are 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels at diagnosis and at 6~month intervals, melanoma subtype, melanoma site and stage of melanoma at diagnosis according to the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer melanoma staging and classification. At randomization a bloodsample is taken for DNA analysis. The study is approved by the local Ethics Committees.
DISCUSSION:
If we can confirm our hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation after removal of the tumor has a protective effect on relapse of cutaneous malignant melanoma we may reduce the burden of CMM at several levels. Patients, diagnosed with melanoma may have a better clinical outcome and improved quality of life. There will be a decrease in health care costs related to treatment of metastatic disease and there will be a decrease in loss of professional years, which will markedly reduce the economic burden of the disease.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28835228
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  #1668   ^
Old Sun, Sep-03-17, 10:07
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,621
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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The Big Vitamin D Mistake.
Papadimitriou DT1,2.
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Abstract
Since 2006, type 1 diabetes in Finland has plateaued and then decreased after the authorities' decision to fortify dietary milk products with cholecalciferol. The role of vitamin D in innate and adaptive immunity is critical. A statistical error in the estimation of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D was recently discovered; in a correct analysis of the data used by the Institute of Medicine, it was found that 8895 IU/d was needed for 97.5% of individuals to achieve values ≥50 nmol/L. Another study confirmed that 6201 IU/d was needed to achieve 75 nmol/L and 9122 IU/d was needed to reach 100 nmol/L. The largest meta-analysis ever conducted of studies published between 1966 and 2013 showed that 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <75 nmol/L may be too low for safety and associated with higher all-cause mortality, demolishing the previously presumed U-shape curve of mortality associated with vitamin D levels. Since all-disease mortality is reduced to 1.0 with serum vitamin D levels ≥100 nmol/L, we call public health authorities to consider designating as the RDA at least three-fourths of the levels proposed by the Endocrine Society Expert Committee as safe upper tolerable daily intake doses. This could lead to a recommendation of 1000 IU for children <1 year on enriched formula and 1500 IU for breastfed children older than 6 months, 3000 IU for children >1 year of age, and around 8000 IU for young adults and thereafter. Actions are urgently needed to protect the global population from vitamin D deficiency.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28768407
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  #1669   ^
Old Sun, Sep-03-17, 10:09
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,621
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Cholecalciferol improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients: a 6-month prospective interventional study.
Nada AM1, Shaheen DA2.
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Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:
To investigate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on glucose homeostasis and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients who have vitamin D deficiency.
PATIENTS AND METHODS:
One hundred twenty-five type 2 diabetic patients taking oral hypoglycemic agents as mono- or combination therapy were recruited from the diabetes and endocrinology clinic. Subject demographics, duration of diabetes, antidiabetic medication, body mass index (BMI), pulse, and blood pressure (BP) were assessed. Laboratory measurements of serum vitamin D3 level, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and lipid profile were measured. Homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated whenever fasting insulin (FI) was available. Forty-one patients (27 males and 14 females) were started on cholecalciferol replacement-45,000 units once weekly for 8 weeks and then 22,500 units once weekly for 16 weeks. Calcium carbonate tablets 500 mg once daily were also prescribed for the initial 2 months of treatment. Measured variables were reassessed after 6 months of replacement therapy. During the trial, subjects were instructed not to change their diabetes drugs or lifestyle.
RESULTS:
No significant association was found between vitamin D3 level and any of the measured variables apart from a significant positive correlation with blood urea nitrogen. Vitamin D3 replacement was associated with a significant increase in its level (14.04.0 vs 31.0 vs 7.9 ng/mL, P<0.001). This was associated with a significant reduction of HbA1c (7.91.7 vs 7.4%1.2%, P=0.001) and FPG (9.14.3 vs 7.92.4 mmol/L, P=0.034). Mean reduction of HbA1c was 0.54% and that of FPG was 1.22 mmol/L. FI, c-peptide and insulin resistance (IR) were reduced but this was statistically insignificant (P=0.069, 0.376, 0.058, respectively). FI decreased by 22%, HOMA-IR by 27.6%, and c-peptide by 1.83%. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase, serum creatinine, and pulse rate significantly decreased (4.30.9 vs 4.00.9 mmol/L, P=0.036; 2.50.8 vs 2.20.8 mmol/L, P=0.018; 4.62.1 vs 3.51.8 pmol/L, P=0.001; 82.126.2 vs 66.219.5 U/L, P<0.001; 74.615.6 vs 70.714.7 μmol/L, P=0.047; and 81.611.9 vs 77.512.0 bpm, P=0.045, respectively). Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, both systolic and diastolic BP, and BMI did not show significant change.
CONCLUSION:
Cholecalciferol helps improve blood glucose control and cholesterol profile in vitamin D3-deficient type 2 diabetic patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28740392
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  #1670   ^
Old Mon, Sep-04-17, 08:24
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,621
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Synergistic effect of vitamin D and low concentration of transforming growth factor beta 1, a potential role in dermal wound healing.
Ding J1, Kwan P1, Ma Z1, Iwashina T1, Wang J1, Shankowsky HA1, Tredget EE2.
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Abstract
Dermal wound healing, in which transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) plays an important role, is a complex process. Previous studies suggest that vitamin D has a potential regulatory role in TGFβ1 induced activation in bone formation, and there is cross-talk between their signaling pathways, but research on their effects in other types of wound healing is limited. The authors therefore wanted to explore the role of vitamin D and its interaction with low concentration of TGFβ1 in dermal fibroblast-mediated wound healing through an in vitro study. Human dermal fibroblasts were treated with vitamin D, TGFβ1, both, or vehicle, and then the wound healing functions of dermal fibroblasts were measured. To further explore possible mechanisms explaining the synergistic effect of vitamin D and TGFβ1, targeted gene silencing of the vitamin D receptor was performed. Compared to either factor alone, treatment of fibroblasts with both vitamin D and low concentration of TGFβ1 increased gene expression of TGFβ1, connective tissue growth factor, and fibronectin 1, and enhanced fibroblast migration, myofibroblast formation, and collagen production. Vitamin D receptor gene silencing blocked this synergistic effect of vitamin D and TGFβ1 on both collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation. Thus a synergistic effect of vitamin D and low TGFβ1 concentration was found in dermal fibroblast-mediated wound healing in vitro. This study suggests that supplementation of vitamin D may be an important step to improve wound healing and regeneration in patients with a vitamin D deficiency.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27222384
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  #1671   ^
Old Wed, Oct-04-17, 05:25
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,757
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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Vitamin D supplementation to prevent asthma exacerbations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

A previous aggregate data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials showed that vitamin D supplementation reduces the rate of asthma exacerbations requiring treatment with systemic corticosteroids. Whether this effect is restricted to patients with low baseline vitamin D status is unknown.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...0306-5/fulltext
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  #1672   ^
Old Fri, Nov-17-17, 11:39
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,491
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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From MedPage, so a full copy.

Quote:
Vitamin D Linked to Fertility Outcomes in ART
Only 26% of women had sufficient levels

Adequate levels of vitamin D were associated with better fertility outcomes in women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment (ART), a meta-analysis of recent studies found.
The analysis of 11 studies including 2,700 women reported that those with adequate vitamin D were 33% more likely to achieve live birth than those with deficient or insufficient levels (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.65), said researchers led by Justin Chu, PhD, of the University of Birmingham in the U.K.
Women with adequate vitamin D were also 34% more likely to achieve a positive pregnancy test (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.04-1.73) and 46% more likely to achieve a clinical pregnancy (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.05-2.02), Chu's group reported online in Human Reproduction.
However, the meta-analysis found no significant association between vitamin D concentrations and risk for miscarriage (OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.81-1.54), Chu and colleagues said.
Only 26% of women in the studies analyzed had sufficient levels of vitamin D (>30 ng/mL). Approximately 45% had insufficient levels (<30 ng/mL) and 35% were vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/mL), the investigators said.
"Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk of abnormal pregnancy implantation as well as obstetric complications such as pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. However, the effect of vitamin D on conception and early pregnancy outcomes in couples undergoing ART is poorly understood," Chu's group wrote.
"Testing for vitamin D concentrations is relatively cheap and widely available, and its treatment is not costly," Chu said in a statement. "It could be that correcting vitamin D deficiency could benefit women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment, but further research is needed to test this."
"In the meantime, women who want to achieve a successful pregnancy should not rush off to their local pharmacy to buy vitamin D supplements until we know more about its effects," Chu cautioned. "It is possible to overdose on vitamin D and this can lead to too much calcium building up in the body, which can weaken bones and damage the heart and kidneys."
The meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the role of vitamin D in pregnancy outcomes, said Lauri Wright, PhD, director of the clinical nutrition program at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, in an email to MedPage Today. Wright, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, was not involved in the study.
"We have long known the importance of vitamin D for bone health. Additional functions of vitamin D that we are learning about include its role in the immune system and preventing cancer. Recently, more and more studies have shown the importance of vitamin D for conceiving as well as having a healthy pregnancy," Wright said.
"I believe we are going to see practice guidelines to measure vitamin D levels in women trying to conceive and who are pregnant," Wright said. "And the guidelines will also include vitamin D supplementation recommendations."
The 11 studies included in the meta-analysis were published from 2010 through 2015. They were all cohort studies, six retrospective and five prospective. Sample sizes ranged from 84 to 517 women. Nine studies reported the women's ages, and, of these, seven had a mean age of approximately 37 years while two had a higher mean age of approximately 40 years.
Eight of the studies used serum measurements of vitamin D, two used both follicular fluid and serum vitamin D, and one study used follicular fluid alone. Some studies measured vitamin D before the start of ART, while others assessed vitamin D at the time of oocyte retrieval.
Previous studies have reported seasonal variation in conception rates, with higher rates in the summer and fall. "The exact mechanism behind this has not been explained," Chu and colleagues said. "It is possible that an increase in sun exposure and greater sunlight luminosity increases the body's store of vitamin D, thereby yielding higher conception rates in summer and autumn."
Previous research has also shown that vitamin D has an impact on immunomodulation within the endometrium, reducing levels of active inflammatory cytokines. "The expression of vitamin D receptors at the level of the endometrium and the role of vitamin D in the transcription of the HOX10A gene (found to be of key importance in implantation) suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D may have a direct impact on implantation and therefore the likelihood of reproductive treatment success," Chu's group stated.
However, it is also possible that vitamin D level is simply a marker for general good health, they said.
A potential limitation of the meta-analysis was that the cohorts of women had different characteristics and that the ART protocols also differed among the studies, Chu and colleagues said. "However, this is not necessarily a disadvantage as some degree of clinical heterogeneity can increase the generalizability of the findings to wider infertility populations," they added.
"To further investigate the value of treatment of vitamin D deficiency in the infertile population an interventional trial would be necessary," they said.


https://www.medpagetoday.com/endocr...0-%20180%20days

A large meta-study from the UK, but Jacksonville FL Clinic seems to agree.
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