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  #46   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:06
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,125
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/232/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 16%
Location: Massachusetts
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Thank you!!!!
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  #47   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:32
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,125
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/232/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 16%
Location: Massachusetts
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Here is one Dr. but unclear if she is an MD.She is affiliated with MIT based on the email address given. A PhD??? Still looking for MD that gave a lecture on the statistics used and how doctors are bamboozled by the advertizing machine of the pharmacutical company.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8-TT87WLBg

More on her view of cholesterol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2Hkunxkzfw

This research doctor talks about the necesity of supporting the body with correct levels of basic nutrients to stop the cascade effect. Iron, manganese, zinc... and more.

A great diet from organic foods and a wide variety including sufficient proteins to make the tryptophans that absorb the blue waves.....

DIET !!!!
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  #48   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 03:54
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,060
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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My long response in the cholesterol/statin thread, her doctorate is in Computer Science, but she has written (and testified) on link between autism and Round-up. Highly controversial.
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  #49   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 07:30
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,125
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/232/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 16%
Location: Massachusetts
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Janet,thanks for thei input.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Fri, Jun-15-18 at 11:45.
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  #50   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 09:27
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 6,125
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/232/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 16%
Location: Massachusetts
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copied from Jenny's page--

Quote:
How (and why) to tame your hyperfocus
October 5, 2015

People with ADHD can achieve almost superhuman levels of focus (referred to as hyperfocus) in some situations, yet none at all in others. That’s because ADHD isn’t an attention deficit, but a broken attention regulation system.

Hyperfocus is our secret superpower. Often, it’s also our undoing. Capable of an amazing state of flow, we’re unstoppable, and it’s easy to get ‘sucked in.’ That’s why it’s so important to reign in our hyperfocus: unstoppable even to ourselves, we become a runaway train…and we all know how that ends.

Unchecked, hyperfocusing ADHD’ers neglect all other responsibilities. Work, school, family, or romantic relationships may suffer. Health may decline due to frequent all-nighters and missed meals (have you ever gotten in the zone and forgotten to eat?).

The good news is, you can learn to let your hyperfocus run wild in a controlled environment. It’s not easy, but here are some tips to get you started.

Know your triggers and risky behaviors

Keep a log of activities that run away with you. What time of day was it? What else was going on?

Eventually, you’ll see a pattern. For example: I don’t particularly like sewing {painting!}, but it’s one of the few projects that gets me out of control, always wanting to eliminate one more rough edge. And when I’m tired or frustrated, I’m more likely to waste time on Facebook {computer solitaire!} because my brain can’t get in gear.

Know yourself. Know when you’re more likely to lose control, even if you don’t necessarily feel like it’s a bad thing: “Sure I went to bed at 3:00 a.m., but I got so much done!”

Limit time spent on high-risk activities

In her habits book, Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin tells us to “decide not to decide.” In other words, set boundaries ahead of time and commit to sticking to them. For example:
Only one one-hour or two half-hour TV shows per night
Never open Facebook after 9:30 pm
Don't start a new computer programming task within one hour of bedtime

Don’t let your brain talk you out of it. It will tell you things like:
“If you just do this one little thing, you can get the program working”
“If you sew this side seam, you’ll just have the bottom hem to do tomorrow”
“It’s only 25 more minutes, and we need to watch the resolution of this cliffhanger.”

There will always be one more thing, even after that one more thing. Decide not to decide.

You also need breaks — ideally, before you think you need them. Read up on the Pomodoro Technique , which advocates a system of regularly spaced short and long breaks to keep your brain functioning at its peak.

Set a timer. Don’t trust yourself to watch the clock, or even to remember time exists.

Whatever you do, get up and stretch for a few minutes every half hour or so. It’ll break the spell and remind you of the real world — and the people in it who count on you.

Use gentle reminders that involve the senses

If you’re trying to break the spell of someone else’s hyperfocus, avoid getting angry. The ADHD person isn’t fully present in this interaction. They may not remember a conversation that occurs during hyperfocus, and they may not even notice anything happening around them.

Because hyperfocus takes us so deep into the zone, we often need more than a simple, “Time to leave for dinner — now.” Create a sensory event to bring consciousness back to the real world. Turn the lights off, provide a gentle touch on the arm or shoulder, or set a timer with a loud bell. If an electronic device is involved, turn it off — but only if you’ve agreed beforehand that this is okay!

You can do this for yourself, too, especially if you invest in something like a WeMo switch or, if you want to go simple, a lamp timer that will turn off the lights or computer at a predetermined time. Apps and browser extensions — like the Productivity Owl for Google Chrome — can help limit time on specific websites.

http://adhdhomestead.net/hyperfocus/
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