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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 04:53
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,263
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
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Location: NC
Default Study Trial Opens for Diabetes Patients in Canada.

http://www.nsnews.com/community/tri...ents-1.23058400

Quote:
The best treatment for Type 2 diabetes might be edible, according to at least one pharmacist.
Sean McKelvey, CEO of the Institute for Personalized Therapeutic Nutrition, is part of a clinical trial that aims to treat diabetes sufferers “just using food.”

The trial is a joint venture involving UBC and 13 Pharmasave outlets including a location in Caulfeild, West Vancouver.
“If blood sugar is normalized the need for medication disappears,” McKelvey explains. “The whole purpose of this is to demonstrate to people that Type 2 diabetes can actually be reversed.”

Type 2 diabetes is typically treated with tablets or insulin injections, McKelvey noted.
However, by restricting carbohydrates the patient goes through a transition where their blood sugar drops. It’s crucial that transition is overseen by medical professionals, McKelvey emphasized. However, that transition can also enable a patient to sometimes give
up medications.
“If we got 50 per cent in the trial we would be thrilled,” McKelvey said, adding there are almost no medical interventions where half the patients can give up their drugs.
The effects of low-carbohydrate diets on patents with Type 2 diabetes “have been nothing short of remarkable,” according to a 2013 scholarly article published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
Those effects include withdrawal from insulin and major weight loss, according to the article, titled Beyond Weight Loss: A Review of the Therapeutic Uses of Very-Low Carbohydrate Diets.
Both glucose control and systemic insulin sensitivity showed marked improvements, according to the study.
A study available through the website sciencedirect.com also noted the diet “has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs.”
Anyone interested in participating in the trial or finding more information can contact researchers at therapeutic.nutrition~ubc.ca.


Links in article. Dateline Oct 7, 2017
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 05:45
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cotonpal cotonpal is offline
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Plan: very low carb real food
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What amazes me is that using a low carb diet to treat diabetes is not simply accepted by everyone.

Jean
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 06:57
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doreen T doreen T is offline
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Open to residents of British Columbia only .. lower mainland and Victoria.

Here's another article that provides more details about this study .. http://www.osoyoostimes.com/ubc-res...betes-epidemic/

Quote:
UBC researcher teams up with Pharmasave to try and control Type 2 diabetes epidemic

KEITH LACEY, Osoyoos Times, October 24, 2017

A University of British Columbia Okanagan (UBCO) researcher is teaming up with 13 Pharmasave outlets, including the one in Osoyoos, to conduct a clinical trial to drastically reduce the “epidemic” of type 2 diabetes across Canada.

In a phone interview from his UBCO office in Kelowna, Dr. Jonathan Little said the project he’s working on with involve a pharmacist-led clinical trial which utilizes a therapeutic nutrition program designed to support the goal of reducing the need for glucose-lowering medications in patients with type 2 diabetes.

This clinical trial is important as type 2 diabetes has reached a crisis point across this country, said Little.

“I would agree that it has reached an epidemic as there are more than three million Canadians diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and another seven million who are on their way as they are considered high risk for getting the disease,” he said. “The estimates in the next few years are that one in every 10 or 11 adults will have type 2 diabetes in Canada … and that’s why the importance of clinical trials like this can’t be understated.”

The only way to currently treat type 2 diabetes is by using glucose-lowering medications or insulin, he said.

The clinical trial will involve getting B.C. residents to volunteer to participate in a 12-week program where they will commit to eating a low carbohydrate, low calorie diet monitored by Pharmasave pharmacists, said Little.

The goal is to have 200 British Columbia residents be accepted into the clinical trial.

“A computer will randomly select roughly 200 in total from those who sign up at the 13 Pharmasive locations across the province,” he said.

The scientific theory heading into the clinical trial is that by having participants engage in a low carbohydrate and low calorie diet, while getting off all glucose-lowering medications, that symptoms of type 2 diabetes “can be reversed or put into remission,” said Little.

The clinical trial has received funding which will allow the participants to purchase foods recommended by the pharmacist during the length of the clinical trial, he said.

“Almost all of the food will be provided over the 12 weeks … this will allow the pharmacists to closely monitor progress all the way through.”

A typical daily intake of food will be roughly 1,000 calories and will typically involve a protein shake for breakfast, salad greens and a small serving of protein for lunch, vegetables and another small portion of protein for dinner and a couple of healthy snacks, said Little.


As a researcher who has participated in numerous clinical trials relating to food intake and impacts on health, Little said it’s common knowledge in the medical field that type 2 diabetes is directly linked to people who eat too many carbohydrates and calories, said Little.

By dramatically reducing caloric and carbohydrate intake, he’s confident the trial will result in participants seeing their type 2 diabetes “either got into remission or at least be under control.”

The 13 Pharmasave study sites are located in West Vancouver, Surrey, Richmond, Langley, Tofino, Comox, Parksville, two in Victoria, Grand Forks, Glenmore, two in Kelowna and the Osoyoos Pharmasave on 78th Street.

It will take roughly two years to disseminate the information gathered from the clinical trials and produce a published report he will produce, said Little.

If the results are as dramatic as he hopes they will be, Little said he and other medical professionals would then present their findings to senior levels of government to try and persuade them to provide funding and support for programs to treat those with type 2 diabetes.

Because of his extensive experience in other food-related clinical trials, Little reiterated he’s very confident that this particular trial is going to produce clear and concise positive results.

“There’s very little argument that type 2 diabetes is caused by diet,” he said. “I feel strongly that by getting people to change their diets and eliminate the cause of their diabetes, that they can reverse or control the disease.”

Little said being involved in cutting edge research like this is exciting.

Anyone wishing to get involved in the clinical trial here in Osoyoos is asked to visit the Pharmasave location on 78th Avenue and register. The actual clinical trial is expected to begin within the next couple of weeks.
.
Curious to know what they consider to be "low carbohydrate". Some consider 150g carbs per day to be LC ... which would provide 60% of the allowed 1000 kcals .
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 07:50
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,263
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
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Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Thanks for clarifying that Doreen. It was just a link on a Tweet...details were sparse! Maybe should move this to the Canada forum?
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 08:26
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khrussva khrussva is offline
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Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen T
Open to residents of British Columbia only .. lower mainland and Victoria.
...
Curious to know what they consider to be "low carbohydrate". Some consider 150g carbs per day to be LC ... which would provide 60% of the allowed 1000 kcals .

With parameters like that they clearly don't understand how this WOE works. If you get the carbs and the fat right, the desire to eat less is automatic for most people. And even if the 'eating less' does not automatically happen, the lower consumption of carbs (assuming they are doing a REAL LC diet) would result in progress with the diabetes. When I first started out I was very sensitive to carbs. Even eating < 40 net carbs a day I could still get high BG spikes and cravings from wild swings in BG. Forcing a 1000 calorie restriction to the mix right off the bat would make the plan more difficult to stick to. They seem to be blending the bias of what they THINK is healthy based on old ways of thinking. This bias might be the undoing of this study. The results might be that Yes - low carb improves diabetes symptoms, but nobody can stick to it.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 16:03
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
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Posts: 35,588
 
Plan: DANDR '92
Stats: 236/183/140 Female 165 cm
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Progress: 55%
Location: Eastern ON, Canada
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Thanks for clarifying that Doreen. It was just a link on a Tweet...details were sparse! Maybe should move this to the Canada forum?
I think there's plenty of interest in the study itself and not just the call for local participants, so it's fine where it is .

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Quote:
Originally Posted by the first article
Sean McKelvey, CEO of the Institute for Personalized Therapeutic Nutrition, is part of a clinical trial that aims to treat diabetes sufferers “just using food.”

I checked his IPTN website .. http://www.therapeuticnutrition.org/about-us/ .. and pleased to see the following objective:
Quote:
Conduct new clinical studies to test the hypothesis that a low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet can treat type 2 diabetes, permitting individuals to safely reduce their reliance on drugs.
So it seems the proposed diet will be ketogenic .. definitely lower than 150g per day!!
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