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  #1636   ^
Old Fri, Dec-09-16, 11:47
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Plan: Mishmash
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Whenever my D levels seem low for what I'm taking I figure my body is doing something with it and take more.

If you have multiple health problems including bone or pre cancerous conditions the body can use an awful lot of vitamin D3.
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  #1637   ^
Old Sat, Dec-10-16, 04:03
quietone quietone is offline
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Thanks Teaser. That makes me continue to wonder something I've wondered for a long time and that is "are the blood tests an accurate assay of how much Vit D is in our system"? And/or "are the blood tests accurate for anyone overweight?"

I find it strange that when my mom was ill and in the hospital for months, her Vit D level was still better than mine.

However, the winter is not the time for me to become rebellious about it. It does improve my mood immensely.
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  #1638   ^
Old Thu, Dec-15-16, 06:31
PaCarolSue PaCarolSue is offline
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I fell upon this thread accidentally and have some questions. I have psoriasis. Does Vit D3 help? I find that getting some sun helps, but I only get clearing where the psoriasis is exposed. That leads me to believe that it's the UVB that is clearing it and not the Vit D produced by the sunlight. I took Vit D3 for a while but stopped when I didn't notice a difference. After reading this thread I have started taking it again. I live in PA where we don't get a lot of sun, and have long periods of cold when I'm not outside much, so I am probably deficient. Also, does a tanning bed provide Vit D, even though it is artificial sunlight? I do do a tanning bed from time to time.

I don't want to test at this point. Also, I have a few serious medical problems so don't want to take too much Vit D3.

Thanks for any info you can provide.
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  #1639   ^
Old Thu, Dec-15-16, 09:31
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Plan: Mishmash
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaCarolSue
I fell upon this thread accidentally and have some questions. I have psoriasis. Does Vit D3 help? I find that getting some sun helps, but I only get clearing where the psoriasis is exposed. That leads me to believe that it's the UVB that is clearing it and not the Vit D produced by the sunlight. I took Vit D3 for a while but stopped when I didn't notice a difference. After reading this thread I have started taking it again. I live in PA where we don't get a lot of sun, and have long periods of cold when I'm not outside much, so I am probably deficient. Also, does a tanning bed provide Vit D, even though it is artificial sunlight? I do do a tanning bed from time to time.

I don't want to test at this point. Also, I have a few serious medical problems so don't want to take too much Vit D3.

Thanks for any info you can provide.
Vitamin D helps psoriasis. A lot of psoriasis treatments are based on vitamin D3 derivatives. Tanning bests, with the lamp right bulbs, do produce vitamin D.
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  #1640   ^
Old Wed, Dec-21-16, 15:00
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...61221125439.htm

Quote:
Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
Extra vitamin D can restore good bacteria in the gut, according to a study in mice, giving hope in the fight against risk factors for diabetes and heart disease

It is well known that a diet high in fat can trigger a metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that pose as risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. Scientists have now discovered that vitamin D deficiency is necessary for this syndrome to progress in mice, with underlying disturbances in gut bacteria.

If these findings can be validated in humans, sun bathing and vitamin D supplements may be feasible and affordable approaches to improve or even prevent metabolic syndrome.

"Based on this study, we believe that keeping vitamin D levels high, either through sun exposure, diet or supplementation, is beneficial for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome," says Professor Stephen Pandol, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA, who collaborated with Yuan-Ping Han's research group at Sichuan University, China in the study.

Metabolic syndrome affects nearly a quarter of the world's adult population, and it is defined by a group of risk factors that put you on the road to diabetes and heart disease. The characteristic symptoms include obesity around the waistline and at least two of the following: high blood sugar levels, high blood pressure or high cholesterol. Sufferers usually also have excess fat in their liver.

The main cause of metabolic syndrome appears to be a diet high in fat or carbohydrate. However, observational studies have also linked metabolic syndrome to vitamin D deficiency, which affects 30-60% of the world's population.

The research team made important advances in understanding the causative role of vitamin D in this syndrome. "A sufficient dietary vitamin D supplement can partially but significantly antagonize metabolic syndrome caused by high fat diet in mice," says Pandol. "These are amounts equivalent to the dietary recommendations for humans."

More specifically, they have shown that a high fat diet affects the balance between good and bad bacteria in the gut. This induces modest fatty liver and slightly raises blood sugar levels in mice. Remarkably, an insufficient supply of vitamin D aggravates the imbalance in gut flora, contributing to full-scale fatty liver and metabolic syndrome.

Vitamin D deficiency decreases the production of defensins, which are anti-microbial molecules essential to maintain healthy gut flora. As expected, an oral supply of a synthetic defensin recovers gut bacteria balance, decreases blood sugar levels and improves fatty liver.

In summary, a high fat diet alone is not enough to cause metabolic syndrome but it is needed in combination with vitamin D deficiency. Accordingly, vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice. The next step would be to validate the results in humans.

"Few studies have indicated that vitamin D supplementation may not improve metabolic disorders in humans. However, these studies are largely based on long-term surveys, which may be hampered by poor compliance and insufficient dosage," says Hans.

He remains optimistic that the results of their study can be confirmed in humans. "We are planning a clinical study to confirm the link of vitamin D deficiency with gut bacteria disruption, and its association with metabolic syndrome," says Han.


The study itself is open access;

http://journal.frontiersin.org/arti...2016.00498/full
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  #1641   ^
Old Thu, Dec-22-16, 05:48
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Recent study supports a causal relationship between vitamin D and Alzheimer’s disease
Posted on: December 16, 2016 by Amber Tovey
https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/rec..._eid=032f6d7ee3
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A recent Mendelian randomization study published in the journal Neurology found that lower vitamin D status is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
Approximately one in nine people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s disease (AD), affecting a total of 5.4 million Americans. The devastating disease will continue to cause a significant social and economic burden until an effective prevention method has been discovered.
In recent years, observational studies have provided evidence supporting the association between low vitamin D levels and increased risk of AD. However, these findings are limited due to the study design’s inability to prove causation. Thus, researchers recently aimed to clarify the causal relationship between vitamin D and AD by conducting a Mendelian randomization study design.
Mendelian randomization studies provide a helpful alternative to randomized controlled trials by utilizing genes to examine the causal effect of vitamin D. For further information on how Mendelian randomization studies work, Will Hunter explained the study design in a previous blog.
The researchers assessed four genetic variants (known as single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) that are strongly associated with lower vitamin D status. They wanted to know whether people who are genetically prone to vitamin D deficiency have higher odds of developing AD.
The researchers discovered that for every reduction in vitamin D status by one standard deviation (SD), the risk of AD increased by 25%.
For example, to decrease vitamin D levels by 1 SD on the natural log-transformed scale:
• If the patient was at 14.4 ng/mL, they would have to decrease their 25OHD levels to 10 ng/ml.
• If the patient was at 29.2 ng/ml, they would have to decrease their 25OHD levels to 20 ng/ml
• If the patient was at 44 ng/ml, they would have to decrease their 25OHD level to 30 ng/ml.
The researchers concluded,
“Our [Mendelian randomization] analysis provides evidence to support a causal role of vitamin D in the risk of AD.”
They continued,
“While previous work has identified possible risk factors for AD such as cholesterol and blood pressure with much larger effect sizes, our results identify vitamin D as an additional factor that can provide a smaller yet important reduction in risk. This provides critical insight into a disease that remains poorly understood and furthermore offers a simple mechanism for individuals to decrease their risk of AD by ensuring vitamin D sufficiency.”
The researchers called for long term randomized controlled trials to assess the use of vitamin D supplements for the prevention of AD.
Citation
Tovey, A. & Cannell, JJ. Recent study supports a causal relationship between vitamin D and Alzheimer’s disease. The Vitamin D Council Blog & Newsletter, 2016.
Source
Mokry, L. Morris, A. Despoina M. & Richards, B. Genetically decreased vitamin D and risk of Alzheimer disease. Neurology, 2016.
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2 Responses to Recent study supports a causal relationship between vitamin D and Alzheimer’s disease
This study looked at genes which lower vitamin D levels in the BLOOD and found a 25% increase in Alzheimer’s Disease
A previous study looked at a gene which lower the Vitamin D levels in the CELLS and found a 300% increase in Alzheimer’s Disease
http://vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=8094

Low sun Western Oregon is a state that has one of highest percentage of Autism and MS. About 30% of neurologists now treat their MS patients with vitamin D3 supplementation in the USA according to Neurology medical journal. It eliminated my allergy to grass with Oregon one of largest provider of golf course grass in the world. Vitamin D3 at higher levels as largely a vegetarian than usually taken has brought up my blood levels to 70 ng/ml 25-hydroxy-vitamin D inactive metabolite. This level also cured my psoriasis on my legs, arms, and scalp and a terminal autoimmune disease Bullous Pemphigoid covering my whole body where infections usually lead to death.
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  #1642   ^
Old Thu, Dec-22-16, 05:51
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,500
 
Plan: Mishmash
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Maternal vitamin D deficiency linked with autism risk in children
Posted on: December 15, 2016 by Vitamin D Council
https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/mat..._eid=032f6d7ee3
A new study published by the journal Molecular Psychology suggests that gestational vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of autism-related traits in offspring.
A large, population-based cohort study recently aimed to determine whether a relationship exists between gestational vitamin D deficiency and the development of autism-related traits in children at 6 years of age. A total of 4220 mothers and their children had their 25(OH)D levels measured using the serum analysis from the mothers at mid-gestation and from the cord blood of the infants. Those with vitamin D levels below 10 ng/ml (25 nmol/l) were considered deficient, while those with levels > 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l) were considered sufficient. The presence of autism-related traits was determined using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a 18 question survey filled out by the parents when their children reached about 6 years of age. A higher SRS score indicates a more severe degree of social impairment.
The researchers found that children who’s mothers were vitamin D deficient presented significantly higher SRS scores than those who were vitamin D sufficient (p < 0.01). These findings persisted when the researchers restricted to children with European ancestry and when adjusting for genetic data and season of blood sampling.
The researchers concluded,
“Gestational vitamin D deficiency was associated with autism-related traits in a large population-based sample.”
They went on to state,
“Because gestational vitamin D deficiency is readily preventable with safe, cheap and accessible supplements, this candidate risk factor warrants closer scrutiny.”
Source
A A E Vinkhuyzen et al. Gestational vitamin D deficiency and autism-related traits: the Generation R Study. Molecular Psychiatry, 2016.
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  #1643   ^
Old Thu, Dec-22-16, 05:56
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Plan: Mishmash
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Sunlight stimulates infection fighting T cells, according to new study
https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/sun..._eid=032f6d7ee3
For the first time, a study has reported the direct response of human cells upon exposure to sunlight, beyond the synthesis of vitamin D and production of melanin.
Sunlight exerts important biological effects on human skin. In fact, sun exposure has been shown to play a role in a variety of health outcomes, including strengthening the immune system. While vitamin D has been shown to increase the expression of anti-microbial proteins, researchers have also wondered if there are additional components to sunlight that may improve the immune system.
Therefore, researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center recently aimed to determine how blue light affects the immune system.
They obtained T cells from both mouse cell cultures and human blood and exposed them to blue light, present in the sun’s rays. T cells are a type of white blood cell responsible for identifying and destroying foreign invaders.
The researchers tracked the molecular pathway activated from light. They found that when exposed to low levels of blue light (<300 mJ cm−2), T cells became more mobile. This response was due to the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, a compound released by white blood cells in the presence of infection. Hydrogen peroxide activates a signalling pathway to increase T cell movement.
Senior researcher of the study, Gerard Abhern, PhD, provided insight on this finding:
“We all know sunlight provides vitamin D, which is suggested to have an impact on immunity, among other things. But what we found is a completely separate role of sunlight on immunity.”
He went on to state,
“T cells, whether they are helper or killer, need to move to do their work, which is to get to the site of an infection and orchestrate a response. This study shows that sunlight directly activates key immune cells by increasing their movement.”
The researchers called for in vivo studies to further validate these findings
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  #1644   ^
Old Fri, Dec-23-16, 03:52
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 8,663
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 220/170/165 Female 5' 9"
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Progress: 91%
Location: NC
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What gets me about all these "NEW" studies on Vitamin D is that there have been studies on many of the same issues for years...Zuleikaa has been gathering them since 2000, yet the info doesn't get to GPs.
A podcast recently reviewed The Happiness Diet, hadn't heard of it before though it was published in 2011. It's a more reader friendly preview of the Grain Brain book...eat Whole Foods for a happy healthy brain and reduce the risk of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, etc. Authors are not big on supplements...except for Vit D, one of their Essential Elements of Happiness! The Vitamin D studies have filtered to some neurological and cancer specialists, but GPs or dermatologists, not so much.

CarolSue, For benefit to prevent breast cancer, even my gyno knew of a 2011 study to aim for 50-80 ng /mg. My oncologist is OK with 50-100, so unlikely that would be unsafe for other medical conditions. Don't worry much about too high a level, even over 50 is hard to reach in the winter! I've written this elsewhere in the thread, but what I think was important to finally absorb the Vit D supplements was removing all processed seed oils from my diet...only olive, avocado, butter, etc. no fried foods, make own mayo, etc. with of course a no sugar, no starch diet too. After doing that, my body finally absorbed the Vit D supplements, as reflected by blood tests. I continue to take 5,000 in summer and 10,000 in winter and my annual test in January is usually 60-80 ng. But that's me in NC, I get a lot of sun, including a week or two in winter. You really have no idea how much your body absorbs until tested.

Quote:
He refers to a study he conducted in 2011, which found that a 50 ng/ml level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the blood - a level that can be reached with an intake of 4,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day - reduces breast cancer risk by 50%. The investigators say that based on their findings, patients with the disease may benefit from having 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood concentrations measured and adjusted to within normal range (30-80 ng/ml).

Last edited by JEY100 : Fri, Dec-23-16 at 04:26.
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  #1645   ^
Old Sun, Jan-08-17, 06:47
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed...5?dopt=Abstract
This study looked at vitamin D's effects on mania in bipolar children, as well as some brain chemistry.
Conclusion before abstract, because it's a little easier to stay awake through.

Quote:
Conclusion and Clinical Significance
Following a “research domain criteria (RDoc)” approach, this study investigated patients with a range of symptoms on a bipolar spectrum, with the common indicator being that all were showing manic or mixed symptoms. We illustrated differences in brain GABA levels between children and adolescents with manic symptoms; that is, patients with BSD and TD. In addition, following an 8 week open label trial with Vitamin D3 supplementation, patients with BSD exhibited improvement in their mood in conjunction with their neurochemistry. However, although a significant decrease in manic symptoms was observed in the BSD patients following the 8 week Vitamin D3' supplementation, manic symptoms still persisted in the majority.


Quote:
Vitamin D3 Supplemental Treatment for Mania in Youth with Bipolar Spectrum Disorders.
Sikoglu EM1,2,3, Navarro AA1,2,3,4, Starr D2,3, Dvir Y2,3, Nwosu BU5, Czerniak SM1, Rogan RC1, Castro MC2,3, Edden RA6,7, Frazier JA2,3,5, Moore CM1,2,3,8.
Author information
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
We aimed to determine the effect of an open-label 8 week Vitamin D3 supplementation on manic symptoms, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in youth exhibiting symptoms of mania; that is, patients with bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD). We hypothesized that an 8 week Vitamin D3 supplementation would improve symptoms of mania, decrease ACC glutamate, and increase ACC GABA in BSD patients. Single time point metabolite levels were also evaluated in typically developing children (TD).
METHODS:
The BSD group included patients not only diagnosed with BD but also those exhibiting bipolar symptomology, including BD not otherwise specified (BD-NOS) and subthreshold mood ratings (Young Mania Rating Scale [YMRS] ≥8 and Clinical Global Impressions - Severity [CGI-S] ≥3). Inclusion criteria were: male or female participants, 6-17 years old. Sixteen youth with BSD exhibiting manic symptoms and 19 TD were included. BSD patients were asked to a take daily dose (2000 IU) of Vitamin D3 (for 8 weeks) as a supplement. Neuroimaging data were acquired in both groups at baseline, and also for the BSD group at the end of 8 week Vitamin D3 supplementation.
RESULTS:
Baseline ACC GABA/creatine (Cr) was lower in BSD than in TD (F[1,31]=8.91, p=0.007). Following an 8 week Vitamin D3 supplementation, in BSD patients, there was a significant decrease in YMRS scores (t=-3.66, p=0.002, df=15) and Children's Depression Rating Scale (CDRS) scores (t=-2.93, p=0.01, df=15); and a significant increase in ACC GABA (t=3.18, p=0.007, df=14).
CONCLUSIONS:
Following an 8 week open label trial with Vitamin D3, BSD patients exhibited improvement in their mood symptoms in conjunction with their brain neurochemistry.
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  #1646   ^
Old Wed, Feb-01-17, 15:37
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70201092621.htm

Quote:
Researchers have identified a new way vitamin D helps control the balance of lipids in the body. This key finding could advance development of new treatments for metabolic disorders and certain cancers.

A team led by Motonari Uesugi, professor and deputy director of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), found that a vitamin D metabolite known as '25-OHD' inhibits proteins that regulate lipid production. Those proteins, called sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), cannot then stimulate expression of lipid-producing genes.

"To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that 25-OHD inhibits SREBPs," the researchers concluded in their study recently published in Cell Chemical Biology.

Drug companies could develop synthetic analogs of 25-OHD to potentially help regulate lipid production in individuals who lack vitamin D to do this for them.

Vitamin D deficiency is caused by insufficient dietary intake or sunlight exposure, and it is increasing worldwide. It is associated with several bone diseases such as rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults. It is also linked with metabolic disorders and certain types of cancers. But it has been unclear how the lack of vitamin D contributes to metabolic disorders and cancers.

The research team came across 25-OHD while screening an extensive chemical library of endogenous molecules. They were looking for inhibitors of SREBPs, which regulate lipid production, and honed in on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), which is a hydroxylated vitamin D metabolite.

The relationship between 25-OHD and lipid levels has been known for more than 20 years. However, 25-OHD has generally been considered biologically inactive.

The researchers found 25-OHD induces the breakdown of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), an escort protein required for SREBP activation. They were able to document how 25-OHD degrades SCAP into smaller amino acids.

SREBP and SCAP proteins are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets for cancers and metabolic disorders. Understanding the role 25-OHD plays in the SREBP-SCAP interaction and in lipid regulation could open up new treatment opportunities.


I don't use the head-bashy smiley much, I feel sorry for the little guy. But let's jump right over correcting vitamin d levels to making it into a drug.

The blue--Dr. Davis was pretty into vitamin D for lipid improvements, early on, long before writing Wheatbelly. Vitamin D is synthesized from the precursor to cholesterol--so it makes sense for that lipid-synthesizing pathway to be upregulated when vitamin D is low, downregulated when it's sufficient.
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  #1647   ^
Old Thu, Feb-16-17, 07:44
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Big news in the UK today:

Quote:
Vitamin D pills 'could stop colds or flu'

Vitamin D supplements could spare more than three million people from colds or flu in the UK each year, researchers claim.

The sunshine vitamin is vital for healthy bones, but also has a role in the immune system.

The analysis, published in the British Medical Journal, argues food should be fortified with the vitamin.

But Public Health England (PHE) says the infections data is not conclusive, although it does recommend supplements.

These, it says, should be taken for improved bone and muscle health.

The immune system uses vitamin D to make antimicrobial weapons that puncture holes in bacteria and viruses.

But as vitamin D is made in the skin while out in the sun, many people have low levels during winter.

Trials on using supplements to prevent infections have given mixed results, so the researchers pooled data on 11,321 people from 25 separate trials to try to get a definitive answer.

The team at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) looked at respiratory tract infections - which covers a wide range of illnesses from a sniffle to flu to pneumonia.

Overall, the study said one person would be spared infection for every 33 taking vitamin D supplements.

That is more effective than flu vaccination, which needs to treat 40 to prevent one case, although flu is far more serious than the common cold.

There were greater benefits for those taking pills daily or weekly - rather than in monthly super-doses - and in people who were deficient in the first place.

One of the researchers, Prof Adrian Martineau, said: "Assuming a UK population of 65 million, and that 70% have at least one acute respiratory infection each year, then daily or weekly vitamin D supplements will mean 3.25 million fewer people would get at least one acute respiratory infection a year."

PHE already advises everyone to take vitamin D supplements in autumn and winter for the sake of healthy bones and muscles.

They are recommended all year round for some people who get little sunlight on their skin, including people in care homes or those who cover up.

However, there is considerable debate about the importance of the latest study.

Prof Louis Levy, the head of nutrition science at PHE, said: "The evidence on vitamin D and infection is inconsistent and this study does not provide sufficient evidence to support recommending vitamin D for reducing the risk of respiratory tract infections."

But Prof Martin Hewison, from the University of Birmingham and the Society for Endocrinology, said the findings were "striking".

"I agree with the authors that this study supports a new indication for vitamin D beyond its established benefits for bone health," he added.

And the research wing of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research which funded the study, said the findings were "worthy of serious further debate".

Ultimately, the researcher team at QMUL want vitamin D to be added to food like in the US where milk is fortified.

Prof Martineau said: "Vitamin D fortification of foods provides a steady, low-level intake of vitamin D that has virtually eliminated profound vitamin D deficiency in several countries.

"By demonstrating this new benefit of vitamin D, our study strengthens the case for introducing food fortification to improve vitamin D levels in countries such as the UK where profound vitamin D deficiency is common."



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38988982



Quote:
Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data

BMJ 2017; 356 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i6583 (Published 15 February 2017)

http://www.bmj.com/content/356/bmj.i6583
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