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  #1651   ^
Old Sat, Aug-19-17, 09:08
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,570
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Topical vitamin D3 derivatives in treating hyperkeratotic palmoplantar eczema: a report of five patients.
Egawa K1.
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Abstract
The treatment of hyperkeratotic palmoplantar eczema is notoriously difficult. A considerable number of patients do not or only partially respond to the current treatments such as topical corticosteroids, topical keratolytics, or PUVA therapy. The purpose of this pilot study was to look for an alternative treatment for hyperkeratotic palmoplantar eczema. We treated five patients with topical vitamin D3 derivatives (calcipotriol 50 microg/g and maxacalcitol 25 microg/g ointments). The lesions almost disappeared after 2 to 8 weeks of treatment in four patients and extremely improved with a seven week treatment in one patient. No adverse effect was observed during or after the treatment, and routine laboratory investigations were within normal ranges. When relapses occurred, they responded well to retreatment. Although the study is preliminary, the results suggest that vitamin D3 derivatives offer a safe, effective alternative form of treatment for recalcitrant hyperkeratotic palmoplantar eczema.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16043902
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  #1652   ^
Old Sat, Aug-19-17, 17:40
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,570
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Have a Low Response Rate to Vitamin D Supplementation.
Dasarathy J1, Varghese R1, Feldman A1, Khiyami A2, McCullough AJ3, Dasarathy S4.
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Abstract
Background: Hypovitaminosis D is associated with an increased severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but reports on the response to cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) supplementation are conflicting.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if standard vitamin D3 supplementation is effective in NAFLD with hypovitaminosis D.Methods: Sixty-five well-characterized adults [age (mean SD): 51.6 12.3 y] with biopsy-proven NAFLD were screened. Forty-two patients (the ratio of men to women was 13:29) had hypovitaminosis D (plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <30 ng/mL). An observational study was performed in NAFLD patients with hypovitaminosis D treated with 2000 IU cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) daily for 6 mo per clinical practice. Plasma 25(OH)D, hepatic and metabolic panels, and metabolic syndrome components were assessed before and after cholecalciferol supplementation. Body composition was measured by using bioelectrical impedance analysis. The primary outcome measure was plasma 25(OH)D ≥30 ng/mL at the end of the study. Secondary outcomes included change in serum transaminases, fasting plasma glucose, and insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Chi-square, Student's t tests, correlation coefficient, and multivariate analysis were performed.Results: Twenty-six (61.9%) patients had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and 16 (38.1%) had hepatic steatosis. After 6 mo of cholecalciferol supplementation, plasma 25(OH)D ≥30 ng/mL was observed in 16 subjects (38.1%; responders) whereas the remaining 26 patients (61.9%) were nonresponders with plasma 25(OH)D <30 ng/mL. Significantly fewer (P < 0.01) patients with NASH were responders (4 of 26, 15.4%) than those with hepatic steatosis (12 of 16, 75%). Baseline fasting serum alanine aminotransferase, plasma glucose, and HOMA-IR were similar in the responders and nonresponders, but the NASH score on the liver biopsy was lower (16.5%) in the responders (P < 0.001). Nonresponders had a higher fat mass (10.5%) and lower fat-free mass (10.4%) than responders did. End-of-treatment alanine aminotransferase and HOMA-IR improved only in responders. The baseline HOMA-IR and histological NASH score were independent predictors of nonresponse to cholecalciferol supplementation.Conclusions: Daily supplementation with 2000 IU cholecalciferol for 6 mo did not correct hypovitaminosis D in the majority of patients with NASH. Further studies are needed to determine if higher doses are effective. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as 13-00153.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28814531
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  #1653   ^
Old Sat, Aug-19-17, 17:41
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,570
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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Effect of vitamin D supplementation in chronic widespread pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Yong WC1, Sanguankeo A2,3, Upala S2,3.
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Abstract
Chronic non-specific widespread pain (CWP) including fibromyalgia (FMS) is characterized by widespread pain, reduced pain threshold, and multiple tender points on examination, causing disability and decreased quality of life. Vitamin D has been proposed as an associated factor in CWP. This meta-analysis aimed to explore the benefit of vitamin D supplementation in the management of CWP. A comprehensive search of the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase databases was performed from inception through January 2017. The inclusion criterion was the randomized clinical trials' evaluating the effects of vitamin D treatment in adult subjects with CWP or FMS. CWP was defined as chronic recurrent musculoskeletal pain without secondary causes; FMS patients met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for FMS. Study outcome was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS) of pain intensity. Pooled mean difference (MD) of VAS and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect meta-analysis. Meta-regression analysis using a random-effects model was performed to explore the effects of change in vitamin D in the treatment group on difference in the mean of VAS. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the robustness of results. The between-study heterogeneity of effect size was quantified using the Q statistic and I 2. Data were extracted from four randomized controlled trials involving 287 subjects. Pooled result demonstrated a significantly lower VAS in CWP patients who received vitamin D treatment compared with those who received placebo (MD~=~0.46; 95% CI 0.09-0.89, I 2~=~48%). Meta-regression analysis revealed no significant relationship between the changes of vitamin D and VAS (coefficient~=~0.04 (95% CI -0.01 to 0.08), p~=~0.10). In this meta-analysis, we conclude that vitamin D supplementation is able to decrease pain scores and improve pain despite no significant change in VAS after increasing serum vitamin D level. Further studies need to be conducted in order to explore the improvement of functional status, quality of life, and the pathophysiological change that improves chronic widespread pain.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28812209
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  #1654   ^
Old Sat, Aug-19-17, 17:44
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,570
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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The Big Vitamin D Mistake.
Papadimitriou DT1,2.
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Abstract
Since 2006, type 1 diabetes in Finland has plateaued and then decreased after the authorities' decision to fortify dietary milk products with cholecalciferol. The role of vitamin D in innate and adaptive immunity is critical. A statistical error in the estimation of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D was recently discovered; in a correct analysis of the data used by the Institute of Medicine, it was found that 8895 IU/d was needed for 97.5% of individuals to achieve values ≥50 nmol/L. Another study confirmed that 6201 IU/d was needed to achieve 75 nmol/L and 9122 IU/d was needed to reach 100 nmol/L. The largest meta-analysis ever conducted of studies published between 1966 and 2013 showed that 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <75 nmol/L may be too low for safety and associated with higher all-cause mortality, demolishing the previously presumed U-shape curve of mortality associated with vitamin D levels. Since all-disease mortality is reduced to 1.0 with serum vitamin D levels ≥100 nmol/L, we call public health authorities to consider designating as the RDA at least three-fourths of the levels proposed by the Endocrine Society Expert Committee as safe upper tolerable daily intake doses. This could lead to a recommendation of 1000 IU for children <1 year on enriched formula and 1500 IU for breastfed children older than 6 months, 3000 IU for children >1 year of age, and around 8000 IU for young adults and thereafter. Actions are urgently needed to protect the global population from vitamin D deficiency.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28768407
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