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  #1   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 03:25
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Potato industry targets trendy Paleo diet

Quote:
Potato industry targets trendy Paleo diet

The U.S. potato industry has taken umbrage with a popular dietary fad, which is based on the premise that humans ate healthier during the Stone Age than following the advent of agriculture.

The Paleolithic diet — coined by Colorado State University emeritus professor Loren Cordain — promotes foods that would have been available to hunter-gatherers more than 10,000 years ago, such as grass-fed meat, wild game, nuts, fruits and non-starchy vegetables.

In addition to processed foods and salt, the popular diet frowns upon some of the major commodities produced in the Northwest, including potatoes, cereals, dairy, sugar and legumes. Cordain reasons the foods weren’t present during the Paleolithic Period, and humans, therefore, haven’t adapted to eating them.

Cordain vows Paleo dieters achieve weight loss, reduced diabetes and diseases, increased energy, fewer allergies, better digestion and increased muscle. Critics counter that modern foods, developed over centuries of selective breeding, don’t resemble Paleolithic foods. They also note the diet’s conspicuous absence of Stone Age dietary staples — such as rats, mice, squirrels, stripped bark, insects and lizards — and question the wisdom of emulating an ancient people who typically died in their 30s.

The potato industry — still seeking to improve consumer perceptions affected by the low-carbohydrate Atkins diet craze — recently launched a campaign highlighting the importance of the spud’s protein, vitamin C, potassium and carbohydrates to athletic performance.

“I think a lot of people are really getting tired of all of these really restrictive diets and are more interested in learning how to eat properly in a way they can work into their lifestyle, based on the basic ideas of moderation and good diversity,” said John Toaspern, chief marketing officer with Potatoes USA.

The organization has been publicizing a paper critical of the Paleo diet, published in the December issue of the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal. The author, Katherine Beals, an associate professor in Utah State University’s Department of Nutrition and Integrated Sociology, has consulted for Potatoes USA in the past, though her paper wasn’t commissioned by the industry.

During the peak of the Atkins diet’s popularity, Beals conducted a clinical study finding its benefits were short-lived, and weren’t sustainable beyond a year. She has similar suspicions about the Paleo diet, and her recent paper found no scientific basis to support eating like a caveman.

Beals, who serves on the committee that ranks the best and worst diets for U.S. News & World Report, recommends diets that don’t restrict food groups, but rather promote consuming a broad variety of foods in moderation. She emphasizes exercise is often overlooked in diets, and people’s survival depended on being active in the Stone Age.

“I find it irritating that people are making money off of unsuspecting consumers that are truly looking for a way to become healthier and lose weight,” Beals said.

Cordain, who credits his mentor Dr. S. Boyd Eaton with developing the concept for the Paleo diet in a 1985 “landmark” paper, said 25 scientific reviews confirm its long-term effectiveness.

“Millions of people worldwide have been following the Paleo diet for more than a decade, suggesting that it is indeed sustainable and healthful,” Cordain said.

Cordain points out that USDA-sanctioned vegan diets also restrict entire food groups, and USDA guidelines support Paleo diet goals of reducing consumption of refined grains and sugars, as well as processed foods. Furthermore, he said the vitamin content of wild and domestic plant and animal foods is nearly identical.

http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/loc...endy-paleo-diet
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 04:15
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Default

Quote:
“Millions of people worldwide have been following the Paleo diet for more than a decade, suggesting that it is indeed sustainable and healthful,” Cordain said.


Hello? Did the potato industry marketing board just awake to the idea that the Paleo diet excludes over-hybridized white potatoes? Do they realize sweet and purple potatoes are allowed? Where have they been the last decade?

Particularly ironic that by Google search rankings the Paleo diet is now less popular than the term Ketogenic, which wouldn't allow any form of starchy tubers. https://www.dietdoctor.com/paleo-movement-dying. The article about the Ketogenic Diet is planned for 2025.

And speaking of The Ketogenic Diet, a new slideshow about it was in the WebMD newsletter and is available on the website, a number of the slides are about the health benefits!
http://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-ketogenic-diet

Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, May-01-17 at 06:31.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 07:32
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teaser teaser is offline
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For some reason, sustainability of low carb and paleo diets are things that need to be proven--but sustainability of a "moderation" approach that can simply be fitted into a person's lifestyle etc. is something that can just be assumed.

Restriction bad, moderation good. Check your dictionary, these two words are synonymous to some degree, moderation has lost its true meaning of "the avoidance of excess or extremes," and come to mean "I can haz french fries?" The total restriction of potatoes or sugar is not extreme, because we don't actually need these in our diet. What is moderate? Eating pure cyanide is not moderate, risking some trace cyanide from flax seed consumption can be moderate, the dose makes the poison. The amount of potato or carbohydrate that raises my blood glucose beyond a certain point, or that had my blood pressure going further into hypertension as I got older was not moderate. A food is not moderate, my body's response to a food is what matters. I need a diet that allows my body to maintain a certain homeostasis, a balanced metabolism is what matters, as Dr. Atkins professed, if that requires an "unbalanced" diet, then so be it.

Also--defense of balanced approaches, that doesn't come in when the potato industry is busy with "the all potato diet" type stunts. Stunts that I have no trouble with--the fact that the people who do these often do show some real metabolic improvements only illustrates my theme here, it's not a matter of how ridiculous your diet isn't, it all comes down to how well your body is capable of balancing things in response to given inputs.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 11:01
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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The potato industry is responding to lost profits, not lost health.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 13:20
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thud123 thud123 is online now
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The DD article prompted me to do a comparison. Little to do with the price of potatoes but I thought it interesting. Those little paleo spikes happen around the first of the years, I suppose people looking to take a break from pounding themselves with sugar. I expect the "keto" line to be the same with nothing really learned.



to quote the rock singer Sting in one of his songs, "Men go crazy in congregations but only get better one by one..."

True on the internets. True here; Both the crazy and better part.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 15:03
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Quote:
“I think a lot of people are really getting tired of all of these really restrictive diets and are more interested in learning how to eat properly in a way they can work into their lifestyle, based on the basic ideas of moderation and good diversity,”

I totally agree. Let's illustrate.

Potatoes once in a while is moderation. Since it's not always potatoes, it follows that it creates good diversity to eat something else, also once in a while. When it comes to eating something, "none" is a valid choice. In fact, it's not just a valid choice, it's the first choice, i.e. are we hungry? Yes or no, where "no" means we eat none of it.

Let's widen our interpretation of moderation and good diversity. Let's say we eat Paleo sometimes, Atkins sometimes, some other diet sometimes, and so forth. Doing this adheres to the imperative of moderation, where we do not eat any excess of any particular diet for any length of time. And by the very nature of this method, we also adhere to the imperative of good diversity, where we eat a much wider variety of all available foods. Unfortunately for the potato people, this means potatoes will form only a tiny fraction of the total food eaten.

By their very nature, all diets restrict some food or other. In fact, the official guidelines restrict fat and meat. I have an idea. Instead of a guideline that tells us what to eat and what not to eat, how about a guideline that gives us solid information about food so we can make informed decisions for ourselves. We're adults after all, we should be able to decide, ya?
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 19:32
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rightnow rightnow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thud123
to quote the rock singer Sting in one of his songs, "Men go crazy in congregations but only get better one by one...

I have oft quoted that but never heard anyone else do so!

PJ
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, May-01-17, 19:39
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rightnow rightnow is offline
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Plan: Dirty Primal Mostly Keto
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Default

Quote:
people are really getting tired of all of these really restrictive diets and are more interested in learning how to eat properly in a way they can work into their lifestyle,

Well there you have it. It's only restrictive if your "lifestyle" demands it.

So the lifestyle is really the issue. Any lifestyle that can't function properly without being able to have french fries and wheat regularly, you can either change your eating to include them, or change your lifestyle to not need to include them.

Ironically, with some exceptions, anybody they are likely to hire to feature in marketing campaigns selling their potatoes, will be people who spend a decent chunk of time restricting their diet to not include potatoes.

PJ
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, May-02-17, 13:55
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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A local paper had a similar article this week, but the person being interviewed - a Washington potato farmer - blamed the "fad" of Atkins. But he said the dip in sales only lasted for a few years & went right back up again. NE Washington & Idaho potatoes are mostly sent to processors, so I guess people still wanted their frozen fries & dehydrated mashed potatoes & hashbrowns.

And someone is eating my share! Come to think of it, my husband's share too, as he doesn't eat fries & only rarely has regular potatoes.
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