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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 08:18
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
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Default Time for your First Breakfast...and then the Second!!

Relentless food marketers creating more ways to get us to eat more, and more often during the day. However did they convince people that eating two high-carb breakfasts will let you eat a better lunch? and with less calories or carbs in total?

Wall Street Journal article posted on-line three hours ago...maybe in tomorrow's US print edition? or only UK edition?

https://www.wsj.com/articles/time-f...fast-1493114402

Quote:
Time for Your First Breakfast

A bagel [stop right here! this is the problem ] when we wake up, and a pot of yogurt at our desks later; more people are eating a second breakfast

By Ellen Byron
April 25, 2017 6:00 a.m.

The most important meal of the day is increasingly eaten twice.

After years of fretting that people had stopped eating breakfast, or simply nibbled on the go, food makers and restaurants are discovering that more of us actually want to eat more than once in the morning.

“We see a lot of people grab something when they’re rushing out the door, then they have a second breakfast once they make it to their desk,” says Siggi Hilmarsson, founder and chief executive of the Icelandic Milk and Skyr Corp., which makes Siggi’s yogurts. In January, the company introduced its first single-serve yogurt drink. Then, it discovered via social media posts that people were drinking it as an early-morning, pre-workout meal. A more substantial second breakfast usually follows later in the morning, Mr. Hilmarsson says.


Restaurant chain Pret A Manger sees a rush of customers between 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., and another rush around 10:30 a.m. “They are having that second breakfast,” says Jo Brett, U.S. president of Pret A Manger. “People are eating more little portions, more often.”

In response to demand for smaller servings, including in the morning, this month the chain, which has about 440 locations world-wide and 76 in the U.S., is expanding its selection of pots, its name for the small portions of foods including fruit, yogurt and hard-boiled eggs. New pots will include more protein and vegetable options, the company says.

The makers of Siggi’s yogurt were surprised to discover customers drinking it as a first breakfast.

The fast-growing habit seems to have caught the giant food industry by surprise. Food makers have focused on persuading us to eat breakfast food all day, such as cereal for dinner and oatmeal for an afternoon snack. Meanwhile, consumers have expanded their appetite for what passes as breakfast food as restaurants serve up grain bowls and even salmon and chicken slices during morning hours. Multiple breakfasts are often celebrated in social-media posts, with more than 87,000 posts on Instagram using #secondbreakfast.

Food companies see the second breakfast as more than just a conventional coffee break. Jimmy Dean last year introduced a line of microwavable hash browns stuffed with ingredients including sausage and cheese and bacon and veggies to target the growing “midmorning meal occasion,” says Tracy Fadden, director of marketing for Jimmy Dean, a unit of Tyson Foods Inc.

Since people often eat breakfast while doing something else, like driving or typing, portability is crucial, Ms. Fadden says. The new hash browns come in a “crisping sleeve,” an engineered paper wrapper that helps microwave heating and doubles as a carrier so people can eat it with one hand. No need for plate or fork, Ms. Fadden says.

Restaurant chain Pret A Manger is adding small pots of items like hard-boiled eggs to appeal to second-breakfast eaters and others.

Second breakfasts have long been popular throughout Europe, and even Bilbo Baggins, the protagonist in J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit,” relished them. Americans in recent years have adopted the practice by eating multiple small meals in the morning, says Darren Seifer, a food and beverage industry analyst for market researcher NPD Group, which tracks when people eat. Americans still typically eat around 8 a.m., noon and 6 p.m., but upticks in eating are also happening before and after the traditional breakfast time, he says. “We’re still having lunches the way we typically would, and dinners, too,” says Mr. Seifer. “It’s breakfast that’s getting more fragmented.”

The increasing popularity of multiple breakfasts is boosting sales of convenient breakfast foods. Sales of frozen breakfast entrees rose 24% over the past five years, according to Nielsen. Meantime frozen breakfast sandwiches have risen 30%. “It’s a smaller format that fits in your hand while commuting and fits the idea of the snackification of breakfast,” says Jordan Rost, Nielsen’s vice president of consumer insights.

Enthusiasts should be mindful of how those meals fit into their overall day’s consumption, says Gary Foster, chief scientific officer of Weight Watchers International Inc. Weight Watchers doesn’t have an official stance on how many breakfasts its members eat, but advises that sticking to a daily eating pattern often brings weight-loss success. “It’s energy in and energy out,” Dr. Foster says. “If yesterday I was eating one breakfast, and today I’m eating two, you might need to cut out an evening snack- you have to make trade-offs.”
[Brilliant, that's all you need to do And cutting out other snacks will happen effortlessly after jacking up your blood sugar with a bagel to start the day]

Nature Valley’s granola cups look like a cookie and, General Mills says it works as a second breakfast at the office.

Kara Cozier, a 39-year-old distributor for a health and wellness company who lives in of Waxhaw, N.C., says she usually eats a healthier lunch if she starts her day with two breakfasts, usually eggs, toast, avocado and pinto beans at 8 a.m. followed by yogurt, fruit and granola at 10:30 a.m. “I eat better because I’m not starving,” she says. “At lunch, I’m more likely to have a salad and not grab a bag of chips because I’m ravenous.” She started doing this when her twin daughters were young and hungry midmorning. She realized eating at that time worked better for her, too.

Second breakfasts tend to be smaller and slightly more savory than first breakfasts, says Jeanine Bassett, vice president of global consumer insights at General Mills Inc., which owns cereal brands including Cheerios, Wheaties and Lucky Charms. This year the company launched Yoplait Dippers, a line of Greek yogurts packaged with snacks for dipping. Vanilla bean yogurt comes with oat crisps; chipotle ranch yogurt with tortilla chips. “It really skews second breakfast,” Ms. Bassett says.

The company’s new Nature Valley line of granola cups, which are made of peanut or almond butter poured over oats and nuts, also target late-morning eating because of their healthy slant and bite-sized form, Ms. Bassett says. “This is about food that I can eat when I’m working at my computer, when I need something smaller that’s less messy and less involved.”

Once an afternoon staple, pistachios are branching out into the morning snack lineup.
The Wonderful Co.’s pistachios are usually eaten in the afternoon, but the company aims to expand into what it sees as the fast-growing morning-eating time, says Adam Cooper, vice president of marketing and insights. “People want a morning snack that sustains them until lunch,” he says.

To boost easy workplace eating, this month the company is rolling out its first pistachio snack packs, in 1.5 ounce portions, and a new campaign emphasizing the nut’s high protein and fiber content and low calories.

Yet can Americans be swayed to munch on salty nuts in the morning? “We’re still trying to build it up,” says Mr. Cooper.

Write to Ellen Byron at ellen.byron~wsj.com




Dr Fung on breakfast tyranny. https://intensivedietarymanagement....-lose-weight-v/

12g carbs in 1.5 oz pistachio. https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/nuts

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Apr-25-17 at 08:51.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 09:31
Seejay's Avatar
Seejay Seejay is offline
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I wondered what was behind al those Jimmy Dean ads for a 300 calorie breakfast. Too little! Well unless you eat 2 breakfasts.

"Midmorning meal occasion" LOL

"snackification of breakfast" LOL too
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 09:44
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

There's always the objective of creating a sense of something being essential in order to boost sales. Nature Valley granola? It's got more sugar than sugar!!!

How about no breakfast, 1 lunch, 1 dinner? Or . . . 1 meal of unsweetened, healthy, satiating whole foods?
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 10:04
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
There's always the objective of creating a sense of something being essential in order to boost sales. Nature Valley granola? It's got more sugar than sugar!!!

How about no breakfast, 1 lunch, 1 dinner? Or . . . 1 meal of unsweetened, healthy, satiating whole foods?


Do you mean the Peant Butter Chocolate Cookie? You reminded me of all the crazy statements in this article, I wondered how a Cup could look like a Cookie?

OMG! Check out this video... it does look like cookie. Where is the cup?
200 cal., 20 g carbs, 9 g sugar.

https://www.naturevalley.com/granolacups/

If you ever thought that Nature Valley was a healthy food company with the best interests of its customers in mind, here is how they developed the product.

http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/art...4BC544%7D&cck=1

This could be an example from Michael Moss's book, Salt, Sugar, Fat how food engineers find that bliss point for a food.

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Apr-25-17 at 12:01.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 11:26
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

Incredible. I'll bet they are relatively small, so one could easily go through a box of these in no time.

Quote:
Nutrition Information
Calories 200
Total Fat 12g
Saturated Fat 4g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 180mg 7%
Potassium 0mg 0%
Carbohydrate 20g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugars 9g
Protein 5g
Iron 4%
Ingredients
Whole Grain Oats, Roasted Peanuts, Sugar, Palm and Palm Kernel Oil, Tapioca Syrup, Peanut Butter (peanuts), Nonfat Dry Milk, Cocoa, Salt, Baking Soda, Vanilla Extract.


And here's the marketing tease, uh, description written by a General Mills pro:

Quote:
Energize yourself. And indulge yourself. Crunchy granola cups dipped in chocolate-flavored coating and a dollop of smooth, creamy peanut butter filling, topped with peanuts.

So, the cereal industry is not going to change voluntarily. As long as there's a naive public, they've got a pretty good revenue horizon on these babies!
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 11:41
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
How about no breakfast, 1 lunch, 1 dinner? Or . . . 1 meal of unsweetened, healthy, satiating whole foods?
Now that I eat only 1-2 such meals a day, I find my digestion/elimination works like clockwork. I sometimes wonder if a life of 4-10 mini-meals/day slows things down so that more nutrients and crap are absorbed from the same amount of calories, in addition to the constant cravings.
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 11:42
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neo_crone neo_crone is offline
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Plan: 30/90/60
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Default

"what about breakfast?"
"we've had it"
"we've had one, yes. But what about second breakfast?"
"I don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip"
"what about elevenses? luncheon? afternoon tea? dinner? supper? he knows about them, doesn't he?
"I wouldn't count on it"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA8LV37QwxA

Sorry, couldn't resist!
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Apr-25-17, 11:59
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
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Default

Thank you...I had no idea what that paragraph was about. Cute.
My mind was still going crazy over a granola cup cookie for breakfast...it is two small cookies in each packet so of course some reviews complained about it not being enough.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Apr-26-17, 05:31
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,557
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Default

In the US print edition today. Eight photos take up over half the of first Life & Arts page....Which will convince any stressed out financial analyst who had a bagel on the train that they now deserve a second breakfast

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Apr-26-17 at 07:34.
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Apr-26-17, 06:57
Just Jo's Avatar
Just Jo Just Jo is offline
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Plan: A'72 Induction Lifer + IF
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Default

This is something I've noticed since teaching at a public school for almost 20 years...

The kiddos are eating more and more frequently... as well as carrying water bottles like they are gonna keel over at any moment from dehydration...but that's a topic for another day...

We offer free breakfast at school; don't get me started on what they are served b/c it's always carb-age and more carb-age.... Holy Hannah.... Most kids come to school already having had breakfast, but since it's free, they'll eat again!

I looked up the Nature Valley Cookie Cups and apparently there are "5" cookie cups in a box according to this advert:

http://www.target.com/p/nature-vall...oz/-/A-51532394

Here's the tag line to buy 'em in that URL:

Granola Cups. Simply Delicious. We paired the decadence of peanut butter with the wholesome goodness of whole grain oats and nuts to create a new kind of indulgence. Crunchy. Creamy. Delicious. No artificial flavors, colors or sweetners. No corn syrup.

I had to look up tapioca syrup since it's one of the "natural ingredients" and it's an all natural liquid sweetener created from tapioca starch.

Probably no better or worse than corn syrup, but corn syrup has gotten such a bad rep lately for good reason so Imma sure the food industry scrambled to find a suitable, inexpensive replacement! JMO!
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
This could be an example from Michael Moss's book, Salt, Sugar, Fat how food engineers find that bliss point for a food.
Excellent book and yeppers, I can't agree more!
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, May-17-17, 04:17
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Progress: 96%
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Default

Washington Post has another "breakfast cereal is bad for us" article, written by an author with a new book on Groceries.
It was going along OK, referring to Taubes, until the suggestion to replace cereal with oats, lentils or congee, but eggs did get a passing mention.

Breakfast was the most important meal of the day...until America ruined it.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/life...m=.5a2d89be0a27
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, May-17-17, 13:06
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Nature Valley’s granola cups look like a cookie and, General Mills says it works as a second breakfast at the office.


I will just bet it does, she says with sarcasm so heavy you could bench press it.

From my own office experience, it's an endless stream of pastry and heavily sugared coffee, with people drinking soda teased for their "lack of health" and people eating granola bars regarded as "health nuts."
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Old Wed, May-17-17, 14:24
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I will just bet it does, she says with sarcasm so heavy you could bench press it.

From my own office experience, it's an endless stream of pastry and heavily sugared coffee, with people drinking soda teased for their "lack of health" and people eating granola bars regarded as "health nuts."


When in reality, both groups are getting about the same blood sugar hit from carbs, even if the granola bars have a little fiber along with their sugar and starch.

Funny though, when I was googling for images of granola bar nutrition facts, all the website blurbs that came up with the images touted granola bars as being sooo good for you, although the blurbs didn't mention as compared to what. I doubt they were comparing them to arsenic, although my guess is that they were comparing them to sugary soda, donuts, cookies, and candy bars, pointing out that the very presence of whole grains gave the granola bars a definite glow of good-for-you healthfulness.
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  #14   ^
Old Wed, May-17-17, 22:11
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Merpig Merpig is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Jo
The kiddos are eating more and more frequently... as well as carrying water bottles like they are gonna keel over at any moment from dehydration...but that's a topic for another day...
I see this with my own grandkids as well, though they are all skinny stringbeans - but so was I at their age and so was my son at their age, and now we are NOT.

I went over to my son's house about 10 AM one morning and found my 7-year-old grandson eating a bowl of breakfast cereal (ugh). I said, "wow, I know you wake up pretty early. This seems pretty late for you to be having breakfast."

"Oh this is my second breakfast", he replied.

And yeah, the water bottle thing. We live in Florida so perhaps water is more important here than in cooler climates, and I actually love water, but I don't tote it around everywhere I go. I'm not packing for a trek across the Sahara. I had the grandkids (grandson above and his 4-year-old sister) and we had to drive to St. Augustine area, about 35 minutes away. We'd been on the road about 10 minutes and my granddaughter announced "I'm thirsty".

"Sorry", I said. "I don't have any water. You'll have to wait until we get to where we are going."

"But I'm thirsty! I'm thirsty!" (My DiL seems never to leave the house without 3-4 full water bottles for the kids in the car). I just about snapped, . I actually shouted at her, "Just be quiet! You're not going to die of thirst in 25 minutes!" (in an air-conditioned car).

Then again I got in huge hot water with my son for not giving the kids a snack and bringing snacks with me for them when I took them to the YMCA for a basketball game. They had just had a big meal two hours before so it never occurred to me to bring snacks for them. And sure enough my granddaughter began crying "I'm hungry! I'm hungry!" while we were there. My son seemed to feel it was tantamount to child abuse that I had nothing to feed her.

LOL, off-topic here I guess. Clearly you touched a nerve.
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  #15   ^
Old Thu, May-18-17, 05:01
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Like so many, I love that low carb frees me from hunger for hours on end. When eating the SAD, I was hungry every two hours.

I thought it was awful. I thought there was something wrong with me.
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