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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 17:05
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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The bottom line for me is a meassure of K2 and omega 3's and 6's.

And flavor, lol.
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  #17   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 17:43
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A bit on K2.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vbd8FqnVT4c

The overlooked vitamin K2. Factor X in Dr Price's book but Dr Master JOhn gave it a name and a chemical formula.

K1 is only blood clotting.
K2 moves calcium around-- keep bones strong and arteries clear.
Vit D--partners with K2. Vit D cannot do the entire job; K2 is the cement to put Ca into the bones.
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  #18   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 22:12
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learning mtererore about GMO's abd worried they are in my butter......
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  #19   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 04:47
SilverEm SilverEm is offline
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Arielle, it is a concern, I agree.

I don't know if this blog post is up-to-date enough, but I found it helpful, on the differences between organic and non-GMO labels.

https://www.cornucopia.org/2015/03/...mo-labels-huge/

The fine print with unpleasant news on the labels is sometimes very tiny.
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  #20   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 06:51
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A very good descrition of the differences.

I have been looking for more and more organic foods. As well as growing more of my own vegies.

Picked blueberries and black raspberries yesterday. Added kale and mustard greens to my organic greens from a box.

Trying to make as many steps as fast as possible.
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  #21   ^
Old Thu, Aug-02-18, 19:23
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For comparison, I bought a 2 lb roll of AMish Country butter. The color , thru the white parchment was as dark a yellow as my Kerry gold.

Unfortunately, when I cut into it, the inside color was a pale yellow, soft like Kerrygold, but not the same rich color. At $5 a pound, which makes it $10 a roll, this apparently is not grassfed butter. THe packaging doesnt say "organic" and doesnt say "pasture raised", and certainly not "100% pasture raised".

I was pretty certain given the lack of pasture raised claims that it was not. Just wanted to confirm it.

Just expensive butter. Better prices here for cheap butter.
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:07
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Found a new butter to trial!!

Gave the quarters the sqeeze test, " Dont squeeze the CHarmin !" raced thru my mind as I tested first the kerrygold , soft, then the new butter. The new butter surprizingly was rock hard. Not true of the kerrygold.

Casco Bay Creamery Co. Sea Salted Butter

84% butterfat
grassfed
pasture-raised
no rBST
no antibiotics
slow churned
two 1/lb sticks
individually wrapped
8 oz (227 g)

ALL this on the front label.

Distributed by Casco Bay Butter Co
Scarboro, Maine

Now to do some googling.
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:19
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A small local company that has been growing from a church kitchen to now their own facility.

https://cascobaybutter.com/

The butter purchased at a local grocery is not on their shop list. Maybe it is a seasonal item.

The bulk, 1 pound roll,is at $7 and a lower butter fat of 82-83%.

More googling ahead!!
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  #24   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:24
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quote---



Posted February 5, 2014
Soup to Nuts: New attitudes put butter lovers – and makers – in fat city
Casco Bay Butter Co. in Portland sees its sales soar as the real thing is less margarine-alized.


BY MEREDITH GOADSTAFF WRITER

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Kerry Altiero, chef/owner of Cafe Miranda in Rockland, says he appreciates the “craftsmanship and integrity” that goes into Casco Bay Butter Co.’s line of artisanal butters.

“But what they’ve really got is” – here, he raises his voice in glee – “the highest butterfat content I’ve ever experienced. It’s awesome. Give me the fat, with three a’s. Faaat. I tell you the truth, I eat it like cheese. I cut off a chunk and just eat it.”

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Butter, to be considered butter, must contain 80 percent butterfat. Most grocery store butters hover close to this mark, while the pricier European-style butters that chefs love may reach 82 to 84 percent or so.

Since Casco Bay Butter Co. began using organic cream from the Maine company MOO Milk last year, its certified organic butters test out at 87 percent butterfat. Its conventional line tests at 84 percent.

If you haven’t heard of Casco Bay Butter Co., or seen its line of artisanal flavored butters on local store shelves, that may change soon. As the popularity of butter starts bouncing back, more people are searching for butters that meet that foodie trifecta of local, artisanal and organic.

Earlier this month, the American Butter Institute reported that U.S. butter consumption has reached its highest level in 40 years. In the last 12 years, Americans have increased their butter intake by 25 percent, and now eat about 5.6 pounds per person per year.

The increase has been attributed in part to the backlash against highly processed, “fake” foods, such as the trans fats in those margarines we once were told were good for us. (The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced in November that it now wants to ban artificial trans fats in the food supply.) The backlash is captured perfectly in the new favorite catch phrase of butter lovers: “I trust cows more than chemists.”

Consumers also have been wooed over to butter by the prolific use of the real stuff by chefs on food TV. The seductive flavor of real butter somehow makes it easier to swallow the guilt that once came along with consuming extra-saturated fat.

The owners of Portland-based Casco Bay Butter Co. are seeing this relaxed attitude toward real butter reflected in their sales. Winter is usually a slower season for them, since there aren’t as many farmers markets around and it’s not a busy time of year for restaurants, but the tiny company has seen a 300 percent increase in sales this winter over previous years.

Last weekend, their products debuted at Zabar’s in New York City, where a 5.5-ounce tub of their butter that sells for $5 to $8 here in Maine is priced at $10.95.

Dan Patry, founder of Kate’s – another local butter – says his sales have also risen steadily as the public turns its back on processed foods.

“People are looking for local, number one, and they’re looking for all-natural,” Patry said. “If you stop and think about it, there’s nothing in (butter) but cream and sea salt. It’s passed the test of time. They’ve made butter since camels roamed the desert, you know?”

IT STARTED WITH THE KITCHEN AID

The founders of Casco Bay Butter Co. are Alicia Menard, 37, and her partner, Jennell Carter, 36. Menard’s brother, Andrew, 38, helps with production. The company got its start a few years ago, when the two women started playing around with making butter in their Kitchen Aid mixer at home. They advanced to experimenting with different flavors, making compound butters with ingredients like lemon zest and chives, and gave away the results to friends and family.

They eventually got a food license, and by the summer of 2012 were selling their butters at the Kennebunk Farmers Market. They started with just a few flavors: sea salt, unsalted, lemon chive, honey, and garlic and herb. By the end of the summer, they had about 15 flavored butters in their line-up. They made fruit butters with strawberries and bluberries, and cilantro-lime butter for corn on the cob and grilled shrimp. When the holidays rolled around, they started making pumpkin maple, cranberry orange and gingerbread cookie butters.

As the company grew, Menard began doing some research on the butter industry and discovered that butter is “an artisanal niche that’s about to explode.”

“Butter was kind of following the path that artisan cheese followed maybe 10 or 15 years ago,” she said. “It used to be everybody had processed cheese in their fridge, and now people sort of seek out the cheese shops for high-end cheese.”

Menard also looked at artisanal butter as a value-added product that could help struggling New England dairy farmers. Oakhurst Dairy provides the cream for the company’s non-organic line, and last year they partnered with MOO Milk for their new organic line.

“Our eventual goal is to become exclusively organic,” Andrew Menard said. “In our primitive stage of development, we utilize both to keep us in business.”

After outgrowing two Kitchen Aid mixers – one they already owned, one purchased in the dead of night so they could keep up with production – Menard and Carter added a couple more borrowed from friends. A few weeks later, a relative gave them an old 21/2-gallon Titan mixer. They churned their butter in that used mixer for the first nine months, hand-squeezing out the buttermilk.

“I’m grateful that we started by hand,” Carter said, “because it taught us the chemistry of making butter.”

In December 2012, they started using a 30-gallon butter churn they bought from an old dairy in the Netherlands. Fifteen gallons of luscious cream goes in at a time, which makes 50 to 55 pounds of butter. The buttermilk is either dumped or sold to pig farmers. (When the company gets its own facility one day, that buttermilk will be bottled and sold to the public.)

Since they got the big churn, Casco Bay Butters have been made in a commercial kitchen at the Allen Avenue Unitarian Universalist Church, and packaged in one-pound logs or 5.5-ounce tubs. Right now, churning gets done twice a week, beginning at 4 p.m. and lasting at times until midnight. Sometimes Alicia, Jennell and Andrew sing to pass the time; sometimes they listen to the church choir practicing next door.

The churn chugs away like a washing machine while the three of them work on mixing flavors and packaging the butter that’s ready for sale. Occasionally Alicia opens the churn to check the cream and see if it’s about to “come to butter.” After a couple of hours, when the cream finally turns, it’s a beautiful, soft yellow – the color of daffodils. The yellow is even brighter in summer, when the cows are off hay and eating grass.

“In the early summer, you can taste the dandelion in the butter,” Carter said. “It’s pretty neat.”

The product line has expanded to about 20 flavors, with additions such as blue cheese (good on grilled steak) and truffle butter. The six organic flavors are sea salt, unsalted, cultured sea salt, cultured unsalted, garlic and herb, and salted caramel – a not-too-sweet butter that can be used with everything from scallops and caramelized onions to squash and sweet potatoes.

“A cultured butter is a European style,” Alicia Menard explained, “and there’s a live, active culture added to the churning process. We achieve that by infusing organic yogurt into the churning process. It gives it a nice, rich tanginess, and just a really nice taste and quality – a creaminess.”

The owners – who still have other, full-time jobs – develop flavors with the help of customer feedback, and test each flavor to see how it will work with certain foods. Sometimes adjustments have to be made.

“In the early days, we made garlic and herb and lemon chive using fresh garlic, fresh lemon and fresh herbs,” Alicia Menard said. “The shelf life just was not there.”

Dried herbs and granulated garlic have replaced the more fragile fresh ingredients.

Locally, Casco Bay Butters can be found at Browne Trading Co. and the Cabot Farmers’ Annex in Portland, Scratch Baking Co. in South Portland and When Pigs Fly in Freeport. The butters have been taken on by Crown O’ Maine, a distributor that may be able to help them get into the Boston market.

“Our success is breeding success,” Andrew Menard said, “because people are calling us out of the woodwork. It’s just amazing, the word of mouth. It’s really a snowball effect.”

CHEFS ARE CATCHING ON

At $10 a pound, the butters are a splurge. (The cultured organic butters are $12 a pound.) Most chefs try to use them where their richness will be noticed most – in sauces, in croissants. Chef Eric Flynn of the Harraseeket Inn in Freeport was the first Maine chef to try the butters, and he said he now uses all their blends, including the organic cultured, the unsalted organic and the salted caramel, which is his personal favorite.

The butters also have been used at Fore Street, and Alicia Menard said Justin Walker, chef at Earth at Hidden Pond in Kennebunkport, will be using them when he cooks at the James Beard House in March.

And then there’s Altiero, who says the difference between regular European-style butters and the Casco Bay products is “like the difference between corn oil and extra virgin (olive oil).”

Altiero uses the butters to finish dishes, but does not put them on Cafe Miranda’s tables for customers to dig into before dinner. He saves that kind of eating for himself and his staff.

The first time he put out a tub for his staff to sample, he recalls, it didn’t last long.

“It was like it was the middle of World War II,” Altiero said, “and they hadn’t seen real butter for, like, three years.”

Staff Writer Meredith Goad can be contacted at 791-6332 or at mgoad~pressherald.com
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  #25   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:42
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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While searching, information is conflicting. None of the current packaging is listed as organic, and yet when checking the MOFGA page EVERY item is organic. Perhaps they changed when their volume increased , when new operations building opened.
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  #26   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:52
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http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?...dspice&dbid=130



Quote:
Go beyond organic by asking for 100% grass-fed. Don't get sidetracked by the confusing array of labeling terms like natural" or "pasture-raised." Labeling laws allow products to display these terms even if dairy cows spend little or no time outdoors in a pasture setting. Unfortunately, even the term "grass-fed" is not sufficient since grass-fed dairy cows may have spent a relatively small amount of time grass feeding. The standard to look for on the label is "100% grass-fed." Talk to your grocer or the dairy cow farmer and find out how the animals were actually raised. In addition, if you would like more information about the practice of grass feeding, please click here.
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  #27   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:53
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quote;

Grass Feeding 101
Grass feeding is not widely recognized in the U.S. marketplace as an important factor in food quality, but we think it should be. There's a close relationship between the quality of all foods that we eat and the natural environment. For example, the nourishment we get from plant foods depends on the quality of the soil in which they grow. The same is true for animal foods. The nourishment we get from these foods depends on the lifestyle of the animals—including their access to pasture, fresh air, and, of special importance, the quality of their diet.

While grass-fed foods are becoming more popular in the marketplace, it can sometimes be difficult to find nationally marketed grass-fed products. One excellent option is to find small beef and dairy farms in your local area that are pasture-based. Two websites that can help you find pasture-based farms in your area are www.eatwild.com and www.localharvest.org. On both websites, you can find a map of the United States which allows you to click on your state and find pasture-based farms that are local to you.

A Cow's Natural Diet
For cows, a natural diet consists of plants that can be "grazed" or "browsed." Grazing generally refers to the eating of grasses, and browsing usually refers to the eating of leaves, twigs, or bark from bushes or trees. Cows both graze and browse, but they are definitely more "grazers" than "browsers" and their complicated four-part stomach helps them to slowly digest relatively large amounts of grasses. From a historical perspective, consumption of ground grains has not been part of the cows' natural diet.

Scientists have acquired this knowledge of cows by studying a broader group of animals to which cows belong. The animals in this group are called "ruminants." Ruminants get their name from the activity of "ruminating," which means chewing their cud. Ruminants briefly chew their food, swallow it, allow the first chamber in their stomach to partially digest it, and then regurgitate it back into their mouth to chew it again to allow very thorough digestion. Cows are members of this group, along with goats, sheep, deer, and other animals. By studying the evolution of ruminants, scientists have been able to identify the type of food they naturally consume. The unique digestive system of cows and their thorough digestion process is a perfect match with grasses and other plants that are can be found in pasture settings.

The Word "Grass-Fed"
The word "grass-fed" can be confusing because cows and other grass-fed animals may eat a wide variety of plants besides grasses. Grasses—including bluegrass, ryegrass, bermudagrass, fescue, Timothy grass, foxtail, sorghum, bromegrass, orchardgrass, quackgrass, and canarygrass—are commonly planted in pastures and almost always play a fundamental role in the diet of grass-fed cows. However, many non-grass plants are also found in pastures, including legumes like alfalfa, vetch, sainfoin, and birdsfoot trefoil as well as red, white, and crimson clover. Depending on the season and region of the country, 100% grass-fed cows may have eaten a mixed variety of the plants above, along with other naturally occurring vegetation.

Grass Feeding Versus Conventional Feeding
The food eaten by 100% grass-fed cows is very different from the food eaten by conventionally fed cows. In conventional feeding, the diet typically consists of what are known as "total mixed rations" (TMRs) and "concentrates." TMRs are a single total food mix and usually consist of grains (like corn) and grain silages (grains that have been harvested, stored, and fermented), hays, and haylages (like alfalfa, clover, or sorghum and their fermented versions), soymeal, and what are often called "commodity feeds." The commodity feeds in TMRs may include corn gluten, distillers grains, soybean hulls, citrus pulp, molasses, beet pulp, and other ingredients. Any of the above components may be combined together to make a TMR feed. The purpose of TMRs is to provide animals with a comprehensive dietary food source that is available year-round.

Concentrates, like their name suggests, typically supply calories, protein, and other nutrients to cows in a more condensed form. While concentrates may include many of the same ingredients typically found in TMRs, their formulation often places more emphasis on higher-calorie, fat/oil-based components like cottonseed meal or linseed meal along with protein concentrates and vitamin/mineral combinations.

Research studies show clear nutritional advantages from beef, milk, and milk-derived foods (such as cheese and yogurt) obtained from100% grass-fed cows. These advantages typically include better fat quality (often involving more omega-3 fats, better ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 fats, increased amounts of conjugated linoleic acid, and higher quality saturated fat); increased amounts of certain vitamins (for example, vitamin E, or vitamin A in the form of beta-carotene); and increased amounts of other nutrients.

Below is an alphabetized list of some commonly used terms that may help you better understand the uniqueness of grass feeding.

GRASS FEEDING 101 GLOSSARY
American Grassfed Association (AGA)
The American Grassfed Association (AGA) is an organization offering alternative certification for grass-fed meat and dairy products. We recommend the purchase of grass-fed foods that have been certified by the AGA since AGA requirements for grass-fed labeling are more rigorous than USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) requirements. Once granted approval by the AGA to display a grass-fed label, organizations typically get approval from the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the USDA to display the USDA label as well. You can recognize AGA certified products by this logo.
For more information about the AGA, please visit their website at www.americangrassfed.org.

Certified Grass-Fed Foods
Three organizations currently offer certification for grass-fed foods in the United States: the American Grassfed Association (AGA), the Food Alliance (FA), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Among these certification systems, we recommend either AGA or FA certification. We view both of these certification systems as being more rigorous than USDA certification, and we believe that either certification makes a better choice when you are choosing grass-fed beef. However, we still recommend USDA-certified grass-fed beef over non-certified grass-fed beef unless you are purchasing from a vendor you personally know and trust.

Conventional Feeding
A phrase that usually refers to animal diets consisting of total mixed rations and concentrates that have been designed to support maximal growth rate and which allow for year-round feeding in confinement settings.

Concentrates
Solid or liquid feed supplements designed to supply calories, protein, and other nutrients to cows in a more condensed form. Concentrates may include corn gluten, distillers grains, soybean hulls, citrus pulp, molasses, beet pulp, and other ingredients. In addition, formulation of concentrates may place more emphasis on higher-calorie, fat/oil-based components like cottonseed meal or linseed meal together with grow-supporting vitamin/mineral combinations.

Food Alliance
The Food Alliance (FA) is an organization offering alternative certification for grass-fed meat and dairy products (as well as certification for a wide variety of foods with a focus on sustainability and healthy agricultural practices). We recommend FA-certified grass-fed meat and dairy products because FA requirements for grass-fed labeling are more comprehensive and more rigorous than USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) requirements. Organizations approved by the FA to display a grass-fed label typically get approved by the USDA to display the USDA label as well. Here is the FA logo that you will find on store products.
For more information about the FA, please visit their website at www.foodalliance.org.

Forage
Plant material consumed by animals, often consisting of grasses and legumes. Sometimes the word "forage" is used to refer specifically to fresh plants growing in a pasture versus plants that have been cut, harvested, and dried or that have been fermented into silage. But you'll also see the word "forage" being used to refer to all plant materials consumed by animals, regardless of whether those materials are fresh, dried, or fermented.

Grass-fed
A confusing term because it appears to mean consumption of grasses only. Grass-fed animals do eat a wide variety of grasses, including bluegrass, ryegrass, bermudagrass, fescue, Timothy grass, foxtail, sorghum, bromegrass, orchardgrass, quackgrass, and canarygrass. But grass-fed animals may also eat a wide variety of other plants. These non-grass plants include legumes like alfalfa, vetch, sainfoin, and birdsfoot trefoil as well as red, white, and crimson clover. Depending on the season and region of the country, 100% grass-fed cows may have eaten a mixed variety of the plants above, along with other naturally occurring vegetation.

Grazing Season
The term "grazing season" refers to the period of time when animals are outside consuming pasture plants. Grazing season is usually specific to region and climate and differs across the U.S. Different grass-fed certifying agencies set different requirements for the length of grazing season required for livestock to be certified as grass-fed. The least amount of time required for grazing of certified grass-fed products is 120 days per year set forth by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Intensive Production Systems
This is a phrase that usually refers to the raising of livestock in confinement facilities constructed and designed for large numbers of animals in which total mixed ratios and concentrates serve as the animals' food sources. Confinement facilities used in intensive production systems may include barns, feedlots, stalls, pens, feeding alleys, and sorting alleys.

Leys
Fields and pastures in which feed crops and non-feed crops are planted on a rotational basis. When planted with grasses, leys are often described as grass leys. Depending on the rotational time period involved, leys may also be referred to as "short-term" or "long-term."

Pasture
The word "pasture" is sometimes used to refer to permanent grassland that does not need to be re-seeded in order to be maintained. However, it's more common for the word "pasture" to refer to the outdoor area in which animals graze, regardless of whether they are grazing on native plants that don't need to be cultivated or on feed crops that have been deliberately planted and grown from seed by farmers.

Silage
Silage consists of pasture plants that have been harvested, stored, and fermented for use as feed. Silage is especially helpful during dry seasons and other times when fresh pasture plants are less plentiful. Virtually all types of plants can be fermented into silage, including grasses, grains, and legumes.

Total Mixed Rations
Total mixed rations (TMRs) are a single total food mix, and usually consist of grains (like corn) and grain silages (grains that have been harvested, stored, and fermented), hays, and haylages (like alfalfa, clover, or sorghum and their fermented versions), soymeal, and what are often called "commodity feeds." The commodity feeds in TMRs may include corn gluten, distillers grains, soybean hulls, citrus pulp, molasses, beet pulp, and other ingredients. Any of the above components may be combined together to make a TMR feed. The purpose of TMRs is to provide animals with a comprehensive dietary food source that is available year-round.

USDA Grass-Fed Label
A logo that can be displayed on grass-fed meats and dairy foods that meet certain requirements established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). A verification of requirements is conducted by the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the USDA. Use of hormones, antibiotics, and pesticides—while strictly limited or forbidden as part of the USDA's organic certification process—is not addressed in the grass-fed requirements. As a result of this regulatory limitation, non-organic USDA certified grass-fed foods many contain these substances. The limited nature of the USDA grass feeding requirements in one of the reasons we recommend that meat and dairy foods not only be grass-fed, but also organic. Here is the USDA grass-fed logo.
To learn more about the USDA certification process for grass-fed products, please visit the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service website at www.ams.usda.gov and follow the Grading, Certification, and Verification links.
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  #28   ^
Old Thu, Sep-13-18, 09:54
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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The above two posts are from this group-

The George Mateljan Foundation is a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or
advertising. Our mission is to help you eat and cook the healthiest way for optimal health.
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  #29   ^
Old Sat, Sep-15-18, 11:03
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I love George Mateljan's website! Have been perusing it for years. I find it informative as well as inspiring.
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  #30   ^
Old Sat, Sep-15-18, 22:12
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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I'll be sure to visit this sight more often!!

===========

Using the New BUtter slowly, and carefully wrapping it back up, and storing in air-tight containers. Still amazed at how HARD these sticks are. I CANNOT squeeze them hard enough to dent the stick.
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