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  #376   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-13, 03:48
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
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Quote:
BBC Radio 4

Digital Human: Dark

We might want to drown it out in light, but, as Aleks Krotoski discovers, darkness can be good for us.

Featuring:

Christian Luginbuhl is an astronomer at the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, and one of the original founders of the Flagstaff Dark Skies Coalition. He tells us why we still need dark skies in the digital age.

Dr. Kenneth P Wright is a behavioral neuroscientist/psychologist University of Colorado at Boulder whose research interests include understanding the physiology of the human circadian pacemaker. He tells us about a study he conducted that shows how quickly we can recover our normal sleep cycles when we get back to nature.
http://www.colorado.edu/intphys/faculty/wright.html

Dr Kirstie Anderson is a Consultant Neurologist and is one of the foremost sleep neurologists in the UK. She explains how the human sleep cycle works, and how the disruption of that rhythm can adversely affect us.
http://www.drkanderson.org.uk/

Michael and Lorna Herf are the developers of F.lux, a computer programme that adjusts the lights of computer screens as the day progresses. Michael tells us how they came up with the app, and how it could help users to sleep better.
http://justgetflux.com/
Click on the link to listen to the 30 minute radio programme:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03g94qw

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  #377   ^
Old Sun, Jan-12-14, 08:18
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
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From The New York Tims
January 11, 2014

Goodnight. Sleep Clean.

SLEEP seems like a perfectly fine waste of time. Why would our bodies evolve to spend close to one-third of our lives completely out of it, when we could instead be doing something useful or exciting? Something that would, as an added bonus, be less likely to get us killed back when we were sleeping on the savanna?

“Sleep is such a dangerous thing to do, when you’re out in the wild,” Maiken Nedergaard, a Danish biologist who has been leading research into sleep function at the University of Rochester’s medical school, told me. “It has to have a basic evolutional function. Otherwise it would have been eliminated.”
We’ve known for some time that sleep is essential for forming and consolidating memories and that it plays a central role in the formation of new neuronal connections and the pruning of old ones. But that hardly seems enough to risk death-by-leopard-in-the-night. “If sleep was just to remember what you did yesterday, that wouldn’t be important enough,” Dr. Nedergaard explains.

Eiko Ojala In a series of new studies, published this fall in the journal Science, the Nedergaard lab may at last be shedding light on just what it is that would be important enough. Sleep, it turns out, may play a crucial role in our brain’s physiological maintenance. As your body sleeps, your brain is quite actively playing the part of mental janitor: It’s clearing out all of the junk that has accumulated as a result of your daily thinking.

Recall what happens to your body during exercise. You start off full of energy, but soon enough your breathing turns uneven, your muscles tire, and your stamina runs its course. What’s happening internally is that your body isn’t able to deliver oxygen quickly enough to each muscle that needs it and instead creates needed energy anaerobically. And while that process allows you to keep on going, a side effect is the accumulation of toxic byproducts in your muscle cells. Those byproducts are cleared out by the body’s lymphatic system, allowing you to resume normal function without any permanent damage.

The lymphatic system serves as the body’s custodian: Whenever waste is formed, it sweeps it clean. The brain, however, is outside its reach — despite the fact that your brain uses up about 20 percent of your body’s energy. How, then, does its waste — like beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease — get cleared? What happens to all the wrappers and leftovers that litter the room after any mental workout?

“Think about a fish tank,” says Dr. Nedergaard. “If you have a tank and no filter, the fish will eventually die. So, how do the brain cells get rid of their waste? Where is their filter?”

UNTIL a few years ago, the prevailing model was based on recycling: The brain got rid of its own waste, not only beta-amyloid but other metabolites, by breaking it down and recycling it at an individual cell level. When that process eventually failed, the buildup would result in age-related cognitive decline and diseases like Alzheimer’s. That “didn’t make sense” to Dr. Nedergaard, who says that “the brain is too busy to recycle” all of its energy. Instead, she proposed a brain equivalent of the lymphatic system, a network of channels that cleared out toxins with watery cerebrospinal fluid. She called it the glymphatic system, a nod to its dependence on glial cells (the supportive cells in the brain that work largely to maintain homeostasis and protect neurons) and its function as a sort of parallel lymphatic system.
She was hardly the first to think in those terms. “It had been proposed about one hundred years ago, but they didn’t have the tools to study it properly,” she says. Now, however, with advanced microscopes and dyeing techniques, her team discovered that the brain’s interstitial space — the fluid-filled area between tissue cells that takes up about 20 percent of the brain’s total volume — was mainly dedicated to physically removing the cells’ daily waste.
When members of Dr. Nedergaard’s team injected small fluorescent tracers into the cerebrospinal fluid of anesthetized mice, they found that the tracers quickly entered the brain — and, eventually, exited it — via specific, predictable routes.

The next step was to see how and when, exactly, the glymphatic system did its work. “We thought this cleaning process would require tremendous energy,” Dr. Nedergaard says. “And so we asked, maybe this is something we do when we’re sleeping, when the brain is really not processing information.”
In a series of new studies on mice, her team discovered exactly that: When the mouse brain is sleeping or under anesthesia, it’s busy cleaning out the waste that accumulated while it was awake.

In a mouse brain, the interstitial space takes up less room than it does in ours, approximately 14 percent of the total volume. Dr. Nedergaard found that when the mice slept, it swelled to over 20 percent. As a result, the cerebrospinal fluid could not only flow more freely but it could also reach further into the brain. In an awake brain, it would flow only along the brain’s surface. Indeed, the awake flow was a mere 5 percent of the sleep flow. In a sleeping brain, waste was being cleared two times faster. “We saw almost no inflow of cerebrospinal fluid into the brain when the mice were awake, but then when we anesthetized them, it started flowing. It’s such a big difference I kept being afraid something was wrong,” says Dr. Nedergaard.
Similar work in humans is still in the future. Dr. Nedergaard is currently awaiting board approval to begin the equivalent study in adult brains in collaboration with the anesthesiologist Helene Benveniste at Stony Brook University.

So far the glymphatic system has been identified as the neural housekeeper in baboons, dogs and goats. “If anything,” Dr. Nedergaard says, “it’s more needed in a bigger brain.”

MODERN society is increasingly ill equipped to provide our brains with the requisite cleaning time. The figures are stark. Some 80 percent of working adults suffer to some extent from sleep deprivation. According to the National Sleep Foundation, adults should sleep seven to nine hours. On average, we’re getting one to two hours less sleep a night than we did 50 to 100 years ago and 38 minutes less on weeknights than we did as little as 10 years ago. Between 50 and 70 million people in the United States suffer from some form of chronic sleep disorder. When our sleep is disturbed, whatever the cause, our cleaning system breaks down. At the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Sigrid Veasey has been focusing on precisely how restless nights disturb the brain’s normal metabolism. What happens to our cognitive function when the trash piles up?
At the extreme end, the result could be the acceleration of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. While we don’t know whether sleep loss causes the disease, or the disease itself leads to sleep loss — what Dr. Veasey calls a “classic chicken-and-egg” problem — we do know that the two are closely connected. Along with the sleep disturbances that characterize neurodegenerative diseases, there is a buildup of the types of proteins that the glymphatic system normally clears out during regular sleep, like beta-amyloids and tau, both associated with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia.

“To me,” says Dr. Veasey, “that’s the most compelling part of the Nedergaard research. That the clearance for these is dramatically reduced from prolonged wakefulness.” If we don’t sleep well, we may be allowing the very things that cause neural degeneration to pile up unchecked.

Even at the relatively more benign end — the all-nighter or the extra-stressful week when you caught only a few hours a night — sleep deprivation, as everyone who has experienced it knows, impedes our ability to concentrate, to pay attention to our environment and to analyze information creatively. “When we’re sleep-deprived, we can’t integrate or put together facts,” as Dr. Veasey puts it.

But there is a difference between the kind of fleeting sleep loss we sometimes experience and the chronic deprivation that comes from shift work, insomnia and the like. In one set of studies, soon to be published in The Journal of Neuroscience, the Veasey lab found that while our brains can recover quite readily from short-term sleep loss, chronic prolonged wakefulness and sleep disruption stresses the brain’s metabolism. The result is the degeneration of key neurons involved in alertness and proper cortical function and a buildup of proteins associated with aging and neural degeneration.

It’s like the difference between a snowstorm’s disrupting a single day of trash pickup and a prolonged strike. No longer quite as easy to fix, and even when the strike is over, there’s likely to be some stray debris floating around for quite some time yet. “Recovery from sleep loss is slower than we’d thought,” Dr. Veasey notes. “We used to think that after a bit of recovery sleep, you should be fine. But this work shows you’re not.”

If you put her own research together with the findings from the Nedergaard lab, Dr. Veasey says, it “very clearly shows that there’s impaired clearance in the awake brain. We’re really starting to realize that when we skip sleep, we may be doing irreparable damage to the brain, prematurely aging it or setting it up for heightened vulnerability to other insults.”

In a society that is not only chronically sleep-deprived but also rapidly aging, that’s bad news. “It’s unlikely that poor sleep as a child would actually cause Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s,” says Dr. Veasey, “but it’s more likely that you may shift one of those diseases by a decade or so. That has profound health and economic implications.”

It’s a pernicious cycle. We work longer hours, become more stressed, sleep less, impair our brain’s ability to clean up after all that hard work, and become even less able to sleep soundly. And if we reach for a sleeping pill to help us along? While work on the effects of sleeping aids on the glymphatic system remains to be done, the sleep researchers I spoke with agree that there’s no evidence that aided sleep is as effective as natural sleep.
There is, however, reason to hope. If the main function of sleep is to take out our neural trash, that insight could eventually enable a new understanding of both neurodegenerative diseases and regular, age-related cognitive decline. By developing a diagnostic test to measure how well the glymphatic system functions, we could move one step closer to predicting someone’s risk of developing conditions like Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia: The faster the fluids clear the decks, the more effectively the brain’s metabolism is functioning.

“Such a test could also be used in the emergency room after traumatic brain injury,” Dr. Nedergaard says, “to see who is at risk of developing decline in cognitive function.”

We can also focus on developing earlier, more effective interventions to prevent cognitive decline. One approach would be to enable individuals who suffer from sleep loss to sleep more soundly — but how? Dr. Nedergaard’s mice were able to clear their brain’s waste almost as effectively under anesthesia as under normal sleeping conditions. “That’s really fascinating,” says Dr. Veasey. Though current sleeping aids may not quite do the trick, and anesthetics are too dangerous for daily use, the results suggest that there may be better ways of improving sleep pharmacologically.

Now that we have a better understanding of why sleep is so important, a new generation of drug makers can work to create the best possible environment for the trash pickup to occur in the first place — to make certain that our brain’s sleeping metabolism is as efficient as it can possibly be.

A second approach would take the opposite tack, by seeking to mimic the cleanup-promoting actions of sleep in the awake brain, which could make a full night of sound sleep less necessary. To date, the brain’s metabolic process hasn’t been targeted as such by the pharmaceutical industry. There simply wasn’t enough evidence of its importance. In response to the evolving data, however, future drug interventions could focus directly on the glymphatic system, to promote the enhanced cleaning power of the sleeping brain in a brain that is fully awake. One day, scientists might be able to successfully mimic the expansion of the interstitial space that does the mental janitorial work so that we can achieve maximally efficient round-the-clock brain trash pickup.

If that day comes, they would be on their way to discovering that all-time miracle drug: one that, in Dr. Veasey’s joking words, “could mean we never have to sleep at all.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/12/o...leep-clean.html
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  #378   ^
Old Mon, Jan-13-14, 17:33
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Sleep is something I gotta have. I don't understand folks who put up with bad sleep for years... it's insane. Every time I'd had a sleep problem, I'm flipping over every rock in the field until I get it taken care of.

Of course, there are folks who feel like they've tried everything. I'm talking about the people I've met who just shrug it off!

Bad sleep can kill you!
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  #379   ^
Old Mon, Jan-13-14, 18:24
bike2work bike2work is offline
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Really interesting article, Demi.
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  #380   ^
Old Fri, May-30-14, 06:34
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Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
From The Telegraph
London, UK
30 May, 2014

Sleeping with light on increases risk of obesity

Sleeping with too much light in the room increases the risk of obesity in women, research finds


Leaving a light on when sleeping can increase the risk of obesity in women, research has shown.

Greater exposure to light at night raised both Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist size in more than 113,000 women taking part in the British study, scientists found.

The Breakthrough Generations Study followed the women for 40 years in an attempt to identify root causes of breast cancer. Obesity is a known risk factor for the disease.

Professor Anthony Swerdlow, from The Institute of Cancer Research in London, said: "Metabolism is affected by cyclical rhythms within the body that relate to sleeping, waking and light exposure.

"The associations we saw in our study between light exposure at night and obesity are very intriguing.
"We cannot yet tell at this stage what the reason for the associations is, but the results open up an interesting direction for research."

Co-author Dr Emily McFadden, a visiting researcher at the the institute, said: "Because all the information was collected at the same time, we cannot tell the sequence of events, but the associations we found are consistent with previous research examining light exposure and metabolism, and further investigation is needed."

The study was funded by the charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer, whose senior research officer Dr Matthew Lam said: "These findings add weight to previous results from animal studies that looked into how light exposure, circadian rhythms and metabolism could all be connected in some way.

"It's too early to suggest that sleeping in the dark will help prevent obesity, a known risk factor for breast cancer, but the association is certainly interesting."

The findings are reported in the American Journal Of Epidemiology.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/h...of-obesity.html


The Breakthrough Generations Study is actually an ongoing study and one in which I am an active participant.
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  #381   ^
Old Wed, Jun-04-14, 14:19
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Fascinating, Demi. I know when I got a sleep mask which worked for me, my sleep improved dramatically!

This website has the best selection:

http://www.dreamessentials.com/
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  #382   ^
Old Wed, Jun-04-14, 16:28
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sexym2 sexym2 is offline
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I have not read the book but will look into it. My son and I were talking about storms and showers because I am getting a roof over the "patio" and its going to be my summer kitchen. My son told me that he liked to sit on the porch years ago and watch it rain. We all did and it was very relaxing to watch and the smell of rain coming or the smell after it rains is very relaxing.

We are all very excited for our first rain after the roof goes up LOL They already put an old couch out there
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  #383   ^
Old Thu, Feb-02-17, 23:44
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
From The Telegraph
London, UK
2 February, 2017


Having trouble sleeping? Try going camping, scientists recommend

Over the years, insomniacs have been offered pills, plants, “mindfulness”, and even special lamps to help them get off to sleep.

But it now turns out that a far simpler solution has always been at hand, and one that is, literally, all around: the great outdoors.

New research suggests that rather than lying in bed miserably counting imaginary sheep, insomniacs should get out among some real ones and try a spot of camping.

According to a new study, just a couple of nights under canvas is enough to reset the body’s internal clock, enabling people to fall asleep more quickly.

Modern living is increasingly depriving people of sufficient natural light, causing the timing of their circadian rhythm to slip.

However, a new experiment by the University of Colorado Boulder revealed how a stint spent in the countryside is able to rapidly shift the timing forward by two and a half hours, allowing campers to go to bed at a civilised hour once they returned home.

The altered rhythms were detected by measuring levels of the hormone melatonin in the participants.

Going to bed late is thought to contribute not only to sleepiness and reduced productivity during the day, but also more serious conditions like mood disorders, diabetes and obesity.

“If a person wants to go to bed at an earlier hour, then a weekend camping could be just the thing,” said Dr Kenneth Wright, who led the research.

“Our findings demonstrate that living in our modern environments contributes to late circadian timing regardless of season and that a weekend camping trip can reset our clock rapidly.”

Previous research by the same team established that people’s modern exposure to electrical lighting causes roughly a two-hour delay in circadian timing and that a week of summer sun shifted those internal rhythms back.

But the scientists wanted to discover whether the same effect could be triggered by far shorter exposure.

In the new study, they sent a group of nine people out camping with no torches or mobile phones for a single weekend, and found that the light exposure was enough to bring their internal clocks forward.

Being outdoors and not having access to any technology also prevented the campers from delaying the time they went to sleep, which also helped reset their sleeping patterns.

Dr Wright said that, for most city-living people, modern living reduces light exposure by a factor of 13.

"Our findings highlight an opportunity for architectural design to bring in more natural sunlight into the modern built environment and to work with lighting companies to incorporate tunable lighting that would be able to change across the day and night to enhance performance, health, and well-being," he said.

Insomnia is currently increasing in Britain, with one in two people enduring the disorder at some time.

Earlier this week, Norwegian researchers reported a link between sleepless nights and asthma, saying chronic insomnia could triple the chances of developing the potentially fatal condition.

NHS guidance recommends avoiding caffeine, nicotine and alcohol at night and not napping during the day for affected people.

If practical alterations such as these have no impact, GPs can recommend cognitive behavioural therapy, aimed at tackling unhelpful thoughts or actions that could be contributing to insomnia, or sleeping tablets in severe cases.

The new Colorado study was published in the journal Current Biology.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...ists-recommend/

Last edited by Demi : Fri, Feb-03-17 at 00:54.
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  #384   ^
Old Fri, Feb-03-17, 08:03
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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THIS is like half of what Dr. Jack Kruse has been saying for years.

He helped me quite a lot, and I am still following much of what I learned from him.
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  #385   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 02:32
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Quote:
From The Times
London, UK
11 March, 2017

Why grown-ups need a proper bedtime

It’s not how many hours you get that counts, say experts, but what time you fall asleep


We obsess about whether we’re getting enough sleep, but research is beginning to show that we might be missing the point; going to bed and getting up at the same time every day may be more important than getting a full eight hours.

It’s not just babies and small children who need a sleep routine; adult brains and bodies function better with one too. Not having set bedtimes and wake-times can disrupt the delicate internal clocks that govern everything from our heart health to our weight and our risk of getting diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

That’s why, even after pulling a late one on Saturday night, it’s better to spring up at the normal weekday time than to lie in bed, gently moaning, until 11am.

“The body craves routine — it would love to go to bed and get up at the same time every single day,” says Dr Neil Stanley, an independent sleep expert who has researched sleep patterns for 35 years.

With a proper bedtime, you’ll have better sleep. If your body is expecting to go to sleep at 11pm, and you begin getting ready for bed 30 minutes before, you’ll go to sleep more quickly because your body is expecting the cues. “That’s why some people swear Horlicks helps them sleep,” says Dr Stanley. “It’s nothing to do with a magic ingredient in the drink, but it’s the 30-minute ritual of getting it ready and drinking it that signals to your body it will be going to bed soon.”




Others swear by camomile tea, which has been found to have a calming effect, temporarily slowing memory and attention speed, according to a recent study at the University of Northumbria.

When it comes to getting up, the brain also wants to be forewarned. “Research has found that the body and brain make preparations for waking up 90 minutes before we actually wake up,” says Dr Stanley. “So if it knows what time that will be, it can squeeze as much good-quality sleep into that time as it can, regardless of the total number of hours. In fact, having a fixed wake-up time is probably the most powerful and effective change you can make to improve your sleep quality.”

The trouble with irregular sleep times is that they mess with our circadian rhythm, the body’s 24-hour clock, and create what scientists call “social jet lag”, where we lie in on a Sunday then can’t get to sleep that night because we have done nothing all day, and Monday’s early-morning alarm makes us feel groggy. “It doesn’t take much to throw out the rhythm; even the clocks going forward by an hour can take three days to get over — you don’t feel hungry or tired at the right time and can feel out of sorts,” says Dr Stanley.

Research does not yet tell us exactly how much we can push the circadian envelope. We tend to naturally get up at 7.18am, according to a 2015 survey by the Sleep Cycle app of its users aged 18 to 55, which is close to the perfect wake-up time of 7.22am, as defined by a University of Westminster study.

However, the Sleep Cycle survey also reveals that most of us lie in bed at the weekend, getting up on average at 8.35am. Sleep scientists advocate changing your sleep patterns by no more than one hour from day to day, and Dr Stanley is in favour of a maximum lie-in of 30 to 45 minutes.

The dangers of disrupting your circadian rhythm are demonstrated — at the extreme end — in shift workers. Research has shown that they are more prone to obesity, diabetes, heart attacks, memory problems and early death. However, it may not just be shift workers in danger.

“This is an emerging area of science, and the evidence is showing that social jet lag is associated with weight gain, obesity and type 2 diabetes,” says Professor Mary Carskadon, a world authority on circadian rhythms, from Brown University in Rhode Island. “There’s interesting data emerging — for example about the lining of the intestines showing long-term changes, and changes to bones — the kinds of things we never would have attributed to pushing our rhythms around. It seems the more we go away from a routine alignment, the more we march towards a path that can lead to illness.”

It’s too early to say how far you can push it, adds Professor Carskadon. “Some people are resilient, but others are more vulnerable. The problem is, you don’t know which one you are.” Teenagers have a particular problem because the massive rewiring their brain undergoes from puberty pushes the production of melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone, later in the evening, yet they need at least nine hours’ sleep a night — which is hard to square with getting up for school.

“They are losing so much sleep during the week they need to catch up at the weekend, so it’s like they are constantly jet-lagged,” says Professor Carskadon. However, that doesn’t mean carte blanche to lie in, she emphasises. Research by her department has shown that, even when teenagers are given a modest lie-in until 9.30-10am, their circadian rhythm falls off course by 45 minutes over one weekend.

For younger children the situation is more clear-cut; they need regular bedtimes and wake-times to function properly. An Australian study of 2,000 children aged 5 to 10 showed that a child with a 60-minute difference in bedtimes across the week was twice as likely as those with the same bedtime to display hyperactive behaviour and have trouble controlling their emotions; children with a two-hour difference were six times as likely.

When choosing a bedtime it’s worth remembering that the first third of the night’s sleep is the most important because it contains the highest levels of slow-wave sleep, the deep sleep that rejuvenates us. “As it progresses through the night, sleep becomes less important and more flexible, particularly after six hours,” says Jim Horne, emeritus professor of psychophysiology at the University of Loughborough.

That doesn’t mean we can go to sleep at 2am every night and still get quality sleep. Our body clocks evolved at a time when natural light was the only synchroniser, so there is a bedtime window of between 8pm and midnight when the brain and body can get the right ratio of deep, non-REM sleep to REM (dream) sleep.

“The best advice is to go to bed when you are sleepy and not to try to push through it. If you do that for a week, and fix a wake-up time for the same time every one of those days, you will get a sense of the right bedtime for you,” says Dr Stanley.

The average weekday bedtime in the UK is 11.45pm. The problem is that our 24/7 life and access to screens — which suppress release of melatonin — are conspiring to make us all a bit more owl-like (predisposed to going to bed late). This could be bad news for our health. A Finnish study of 2,000 people published last month found that owls were more likely to eat high-sugar and fatty foods, take less exercise and sleep worse than larks (naturally early wakers).

Harry Jameson, a London-based personal trainer, has many clients with high pressure lifestyles. “They’ll say, ‘I’m flogging myself in the gym, eating well — why isn’t this weight shifting?’ Then you’ll ask about their sleep and it turns out they’re on their laptops until 1am and their kids wake them up at 6am. When we bring their bedtime earlier, but don’t adjust their diet or training schedule, their weight loss usually improves by about 50 per cent.

“Sleep is a key factor for good health, mental health and weight management,” says Jameson. “That’s why we all need a proper bedtime and wake-up time seven days a week.”
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/w...dtime-3thtx80ll
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  #386   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 06:36
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
When we bring their bedtime earlier, but don’t adjust their diet or training schedule, their weight loss usually improves by about 50 per cent.


That is WOW. Shows the incredible power of sleep.

I go to bed at 10pm, and we shut off the TV at 8 or 8:30. Reading on my iPad doesn't seem to bother me, I turn off all the lights and it goes into red light at local sunset. I also use a Brainwaves app to help my waves get into the correct mood.
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  #387   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 18:08
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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I replaced my bedroom clock with one with red numbers on a black backround (instead of the more common white/bluish numbers that illuminate the area around them), and found I sleep better and get back to sleep faster when I do happen to wake up with the red numbers.
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  #388   ^
Old Sun, Mar-12-17, 07:09
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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There are now numerous studies about how blue light tells our brains to be alert. Makes sense.

Also, shutting off the wireless router as part of anyone's bedtime ritual seems to help a lot of people.
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Old Sun, Mar-12-17, 08:47
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Okay, I got the book. Review to come...
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