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  #31   ^
Old Fri, May-27-05, 19:19
ceberezin ceberezin is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 619
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 155/140/140 Male 68
BF:18%
Progress:
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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It just kills me that they finally discover a causal relation between carbs and cancer and end up recommending that people eat lots of fiber because fiber moderates the action of carbohydrates or that bread in the US is okay because it's enriched with folates. It's the same thing as telling people that to avoid lung cancer they should smoke filtered cigarettes.
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  #32   ^
Old Fri, Jan-13-06, 13:31
BKM's Avatar
BKM BKM is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 733
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 159/141.7/130 Female 5'7"
BF: LOTS!
Progress: 60%
Location: Florida Gulfcoast
Default sortof related question....

Quote:
Originally Posted by tamarian
Breast cancer rates in the United States are among the highest in the world. Nearly 132 cases are diagnosed for every 100,000 women.

My gyn just "bullied" me into having my yearly mammogram done --with the statistic that "1 out every 7 women develop breast cancer". Numbers don't add up with above statistic -- 1 out of 7 means 14/100, or 14,000/100,000. If I adjust the 14,000/100,000 by 20 (assuming that they are meaning 132 new cases per year), then I have 700/100,000... or 1/142

So what am I doing wrong? Seems like the incidence is much lower than 1/7?????
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  #33   ^
Old Fri, Jan-13-06, 14:54
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,104
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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I think 1 of 7 is over the course of a lifetime, not every year.
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  #34   ^
Old Fri, Jan-13-06, 18:30
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
Forum Founder
Posts: 34,987
 
Plan: DANDR '92
Stats: 236/191/140 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 47%
Location: Eastern ON, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
I think 1 of 7 is over the course of a lifetime, not every year.

Yes, this is my understanding also ....


Doreen
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  #35   ^
Old Fri, Jan-13-06, 23:37
LC FP LC FP is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,142
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 228/195/188 Male 72 inches
BF:
Progress: 83%
Location: Erie PA
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I believe the lifetime risk for breast cancer is 12%, and the risk of death from breast cancer is 4%, for women.
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  #36   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 03:58
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bsheets bsheets is offline
Faux-foods=Doh!Foods
Posts: 3,247
 
Plan: Low Carb
Stats: 216/180/154 Female 168cm
BF:
Progress: 58%
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerspic
I have a lot of cancer in my family. I have lost my mom, two sisters, two aunts and a grandmother to this gastily disease. Since learning about a LC lifestyle I have also studied a great deal about Yeast imbalances. I found disturbing similarites in the way Candidia prevails in the intestine and the way Cancer takes over its victims. I am not telling my sad story for pity really I am unsure I can be objective anyone have any thoughts on this theroy? ginger

Not to sound insensitive, but what about the males in your family? How are they?
It's great you're doing something for your own health and doing your own research.

e
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  #37   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 04:14
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CLASYS CLASYS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 164
 
Plan: Atkins original diet
Stats: 245/210/175 Male 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 50%
Location: New York
Default

My understanding that for men, the figures are much higher, i.e., much rarer but if diagnosed correctly, likely more fatal.

From my recent experience talking to medical oncologists, it would appear that female breast cancer is actually two different diseases. The differentiating point is estrogen-receptive or not.

Estrogen-receptive apparently is about 80% of reported cases, and is more likely in post-menopausal women. This suggests the possible link to HRT drugs.

The non-receptive apparently tends to occur more in younger women, and is not associated with estrogen either natural or hrt. It is usually worse, but perhaps this is only because of the more difficult diagnosis, and since it strikes mostly younger women, moreso needs real chemotherapy and perhaps radiation; clearly a more serious disease. More likely than not, this is also related to the rare male BC; clearly estrogen isn't a factor for men.

Receptive diagnosis has a possible chance of more early detection, the earlier the better in both types, but more likely to actually occur in receptive.

Self-examination and even professional examination may not be enough. Mammograms may not be enough; sometimes the ONLY way the tumor is even noticed is through ultrasound unless/until it is more advanced. Surgical cases have occurred where only the ultrasound later confirmed with biopsy procedures show the presence of the disease at a relatively early stage; all of the other methods are so flawed that a surgeon was shocked to not be able to palpate to locate a tumor clearly visible on ultrasound simultaneously!

All of this suggests that the medical system sucks, as comes no surprise to most of us.

All I can suggest vehemently is to all women:

Avoid excess carbs like the plague, regardless of age. Triplely so if diagnosed with BC.

Get mammograms and sonograms every six months. This limits the worst-case scenario to likely stage 1 BC or less and maximizes successful treatment options should it occur.

Family history may play a smaller role than conveniently offered up. HRT beyond birth control probably plays a larger role. Estrogen usage has been around too long so all studies are possibly flawed in this regard.

It is reported that estrogen and smoking doesn't mix well; maybe estrogen and carbs also are a deadly combination. All three sounds like a good way to get BC similar to the three-pack-a-day smoker wondering why they get lung-cancer after 30 years.

Michael Landon (Little House on the Prarie, and before that Bonanza] and my mother both died of pancreatic cancer and were of vaguely similar family background [East-European Jewish families]. Although younger, Landon lasted several decades by being on what could be described as an industrial-strength version of the Atkins diet, vigorous exercise, some alternative medicine, and high-dosage chemotherapy, experimental at the time but clearly the precursor of what is used routinely today, likely in lower dosages. Age is definitely a factor working against the young in most cancers, yet Landon beat the odds for the most part; most people are dead within 90 days after diagnosis.

My mother also lasted modestly longer, 14 months, due to an unusual aspect of her case that led to a quicker-than-usual diagnosis indirectly causing a blood workup anomaly that triggered the extra tests and eventualy a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Without the anomaly, the usual course would have been expected. However, in her case, the tumor blocked the bile duct causing symptoms suggesting gall-bladder disease which was tested for, but instead led to the correct diagnosis of infant-stage pancreatic cancer. At her age, 77, this was actually operable but is the infamous Whipple procedure which has very bad long-term prognosis unrelated to the cancer. She died 14 months later primarily due to liver problems induced by the surgery, not the cancer. The cancer itself was detected so early that her pancreatic function was maintained even after the minimal surgery component regarding the pancreas itself. The main problem was the internal "rerouting" of the rest of her digestive system demanded by anything that causes this problem, which is often unrelated to cancer at all, etc.

So, even in my mother's case, the early detection was the factor that gave her some additionaly quality of life, if only somewhat so. Her age also helped to set the stage for all that happened. Michael Landon managed to survive far longer from a potentially poorer starting point being a relatively young man when he was diagnosed with the typical end-stage PC. But making it his life goal to survive which meant lifestyle changes that represent a greatly enlarged superset of what we must do merely to control our weight was what made the difference. Let him be an inspiration to all of us to get past all of our ills and likely controllable health problems, etc.

cjl
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  #38   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 08:41
Azlocarb Azlocarb is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 302
 
Plan: Protien Power
Stats: 225/175/190 Male 72in
BF:30%/8%/8%
Progress: 143%
Location: Reno Nv
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I'm not sure if it has been brought up but I have read that some if not all cancers like getting there energy from glucose. There are some who think that by eating low carb you may be starving the cancer which allows the body more time to fight and defeat the bad cells.
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  #39   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 10:39
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,104
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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I saw an episode on "Mystery Diagnosis" where this guy was getting insanely low blood sugar. He's measure out at something like 35. Turns out, he had a tumour that was kicking out some sort of hormone (a growth factor) that was making him over produce insulin like hormone. What was so bizarre is he developed a totally different looking face, big enormous wrinkles, looked like one of those funny chineese dogs with the wrinkly faces. Anyway, its not a normal tumour thing, but a low carb diet might have killed this guy.
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  #40   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 15:44
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,490
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/333.8/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 15%
Location: Maryland, US
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I would advise anyone who has any cancer or a family history of cancer to get their vitamin D levels checked and to check them periodically.

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to 28 types of cancers. High vitamin D levels are cancer preventive. Vitamin D and vitamin D analogs have been used in the treatment of cancer alone and in conjunction with conventional therapy with excellent results.

As the Vitamin D Council says, "It's not yet 100% proven that vitamin D will prevent or cure cancer but why should you suffer from vitamin D deficiency at the same time you have cancer."

Or something to that effect.

Vitamin D tells cells when to die and cancer is unregulated cell growth.

Vitamin D deficiency is also linked to diabetes and insullin resistance and most cancers feed on sugar.
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  #41   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 15:47
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,104
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

Are there any online sources for getting vitamin levels checked, like healthcheckusa.com is for thyroid?
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  #42   ^
Old Sat, Jan-14-06, 17:12
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,490
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/333.8/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 15%
Location: Maryland, US
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  #43   ^
Old Thu, Jan-26-06, 07:59
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theladyboo theladyboo is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 471
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 245/204/120 Female 5'2"
BF:too much
Progress: 33%
Location: Canada
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From the article "So, I certainly don't recommend consuming aspartame instead of sugar. Go for stevia instead. And once again, transition slowly. If you've been consuming a diet very high in sugar, as most Americans have, you won't have any success at all if you try to quit sugar cold turkey. You have to slowly transition off of sugar, week by week, month by month, until you are completely rid of it. In fact, a one-year plan for getting off of sugar is quite reasonable."

Snicker. I found that rather amusing. So, are we on the quick year plan with induction?
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  #44   ^
Old Thu, Jan-26-06, 10:35
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,228
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/181/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 88%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by theladyboo
From the article "So, I certainly don't recommend consuming aspartame instead of sugar. Go for stevia instead. And once again, transition slowly. If you've been consuming a diet very high in sugar, as most Americans have, you won't have any success at all if you try to quit sugar cold turkey. You have to slowly transition off of sugar, week by week, month by month, until you are completely rid of it. In fact, a one-year plan for getting off of sugar is quite reasonable."

Snicker. I found that rather amusing. So, are we on the quick year plan with induction?
Dr. Lutz in "Life Without Bread" does recommend that people with known health problems transition slower to low carbs. He is talking about a couple of weeks though, not a year.

Taking a year would be like quitting smoking by cutting out one cigarette a day per week. Slow torture.
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  #45   ^
Old Thu, Jan-26-06, 10:37
Lessara's Avatar
Lessara Lessara is offline
Everyday Sane Psycho
Posts: 7,073
 
Plan: Bernstein, Keto IFast
Stats: 385/253/160 Female 67.5
BF:14d bsl 400/122/83
Progress: 59%
Location: Durham, NH
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This is such a duh!!
Isn't it common knowledge that
Cancer loves sugar?
I know, being diabetic, that I have more chance
of getting cancer due to high blood sugar.
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