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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Jun-23-16, 20:14
katmeyster's Avatar
katmeyster katmeyster is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 915
 
Plan: Keto (LCHFMP) + IF
Stats: 265/188/150 Female 61 inches
BF:Highest weight 290
Progress: 67%
Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico
Default Best exercise for lowering insulin

I've just started exercising after losing almost 40 pounds (I've got another 75 or so to go).

I want to make sure I exercise "smart" as my main goal is weight loss, and after that I want to increase strength and endurance.

I am LCHF with IF -- I feel best exercising while I'm fasting as it gives me extra energy.

I have a membership to Planet Fitness, plus this Summer I'll be swimming 3-4 times a week in my friend's pool.

Suggestions for keeping my body using it's own fat, and also keeping insulin low?

Right now I'm doing the treadmill until about 126 heart rate -- and keeping it to that rate for 10 minutes at 3+ miles per hours (I'm not in great shape). Plus doing the weight machines for about 20 minutes, working on upper, lower and abs somewhat randomly and slowly increasing weight. Then I go swimming and do laps for awhile, and then play around holding my breath and staying under as long as possible, and then tread water for awhile talking to my friend. Somehow I have no soreness whatsoever, and I'm thinking that may be from the swimming or somehow related to the diet.

Thanks for any suggestions.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jun-24-16, 09:53
Seejay's Avatar
Seejay Seejay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,010
 
Plan: Optimal Diet
Stats: 00/00/00 Female 62 inches
BF:
Progress: 8%
Default

There's a lot out there on increasing strength.
What kind of endurance? for what activity?

Do you enjoy learning from others? perhaps a one-time series with a trainer would help with the basics and teach you how to teach yourself and set up your own programs for improving whatever you desire.

One little tidbit from exercise science - insulin raises after a certain period with endurance exercise. Like 45-60 minutes out, if you do it hard enough. Also there can be a surge after whole-body anaerobic strength stuff.
See Katch-McKardle's "Exercise Physiology" for the gory details.

If you are just starting, I suggest you start learning some basics on fitness. in my experience, sometimes people have read thousands of words for YEARS on the nutrition side, and then when turning to the movement side, are just beginning. It makes sense to get yourself educated. Plus there is some exciting stuff and exercise research, unlinke nutrition, is in my opinion much more solid because they measure things directly instead of using epidemiological studies.

I would start with Mark Sisson's "Primal Fitness" (sign up, then free download). Or stumptuous.com for a women's strength training site with a feminist edge. Both of those help you set up your weekly plan so you arrange all your different types of sessions for the best outcomes.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Jun-24-16, 12:41
katmeyster's Avatar
katmeyster katmeyster is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 915
 
Plan: Keto (LCHFMP) + IF
Stats: 265/188/150 Female 61 inches
BF:Highest weight 290
Progress: 67%
Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seejay
There's a lot out there on increasing strength.
What kind of endurance? for what activity?

Do you enjoy learning from others? perhaps a one-time series with a trainer would help with the basics and teach you how to teach yourself and set up your own programs for improving whatever you desire.

One little tidbit from exercise science - insulin raises after a certain period with endurance exercise. Like 45-60 minutes out, if you do it hard enough. Also there can be a surge after whole-body anaerobic strength stuff.
See Katch-McKardle's "Exercise Physiology" for the gory details.

If you are just starting, I suggest you start learning some basics on fitness. in my experience, sometimes people have read thousands of words for YEARS on the nutrition side, and then when turning to the movement side, are just beginning. It makes sense to get yourself educated. Plus there is some exciting stuff and exercise research, unlinke nutrition, is in my opinion much more solid because they measure things directly instead of using epidemiological studies.

I would start with Mark Sisson's "Primal Fitness" (sign up, then free download). Or stumptuous.com for a women's strength training site with a feminist edge. Both of those help you set up your weekly plan so you arrange all your different types of sessions for the best outcomes.


You are so right -- I have read tons of books and blogs and articles about nutrition -- but almost nothing on fitness. Seems like I need to do that work also. My endurance goal is mostly for hiking -- I love hiking in the mountains and want to be able to go up the trail without having to stop so much, plus I want to go farther. I've never stopped hiking, but I just can't keep up with most people. My other fitness goal is to not lose strength as I age -- to be the best old person I can be.

Thanks so much for the insight.

PS: Do you think it's the ketogenic diet and/or fasting that is keeping me from getting sore? It's awesome, but it feels strange to lift all that weight and do movements I haven't done in 20 years and feel absolutely no pain at all. Is that info in the books?
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Jun-24-16, 14:31
Seejay's Avatar
Seejay Seejay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,010
 
Plan: Optimal Diet
Stats: 00/00/00 Female 62 inches
BF:
Progress: 8%
Default

Google "DOMS" - delayed onset muscle soreness. There's so much on it. It comes from how hard you're tearing muscles to build them up. Gross sounding, I know.

I bet somebody has even written about how to be the energizer bunny when hiking. Oh the blogs you will go to now!

Could be lots of things. Sometimes we get more pain-resilient when no longer being a sugar burner. Or something about how well hydrated you are before and after. Or maybe you're accidentally hitting a sweet spot, where you're working hard enough to get stronger, but not so hard as to overdo it. or maybe something about your rhythm of work and recovery means you magically provide rebuilding nutrients at the perfect time so there's no need for pain to remind you.

Would be fun to experiment and see if you can get sore, LOL or would that be weird. You have lots of time to play around as you learn about exercise and how your body responds.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jun-27-16, 23:24
katmeyster's Avatar
katmeyster katmeyster is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 915
 
Plan: Keto (LCHFMP) + IF
Stats: 265/188/150 Female 61 inches
BF:Highest weight 290
Progress: 67%
Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico
Default

I worked out about twice as much today on the weight machines and added so much weight that I could barely lift them -- so we'll see if I am sore tomorrow. I'm trying to get to the gym at least 4 days a week.

I am always fasting when I work out -- usually it's been over 20 hours since I've eaten, but that seems to give me tons of energy. I really can't believe I'm doing this, to tell you the truth.

And, yes, I am having fun -- I never would have thought that either. There's something in this exercise stuff.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Jun-28-16, 09:33
Seejay's Avatar
Seejay Seejay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,010
 
Plan: Optimal Diet
Stats: 00/00/00 Female 62 inches
BF:
Progress: 8%
Default

Yowsers on twice as much weight! wow.

I totally agree with you. So cheerful when exercise is in the mix.
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Jun-28-16, 11:03
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is offline
Posts: 5,080
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/200/210 Male 5' 11"
BF:Energy Unleashed
Progress: 104%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
Default

Personally, I love walking. I've recently started weight lifting, too - but for the longest time I just walked. I find a special benefit to walking at least 30 minutes at a faster but still comfortable pace. Anything less than that and I don't get that nice endorphin buzz that I so enjoy. I walk 7 days a week when I can and I typically walk 40 minutes to an hour - sometimes longer on weekends. I think my weight loss has continued because walking has returned me to a normal, active life. I'm not sure where I'd be at in my journey if I had not decided to add walking to my daily routine.

After 2 years of steady weight loss, my arms and upper body were looking pretty wimpy. I'm sure I did lose a quite a bit of muscle along the way. I probably should have done weight lifting regularly, too. I am finally doing that. I just don't enjoy it as much as I do a nice long walk.
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