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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 03:32
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Default Mediterranean diet with lean, unprocessed red meat improves heart disease risk

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80613113743.htm

Quote:
Adopting a Mediterranean-style eating pattern improves heart health, with or without reducing red meat intake, if the red meat consumed is lean and unprocessed, according to a Purdue University nutrition study.

"This study is important because it shows that red meat can be part of a heart-healthy eating pattern like a Mediterranean-style eating pattern," said Wayne W. Campbell, professor of nutrition science. "This study was not designed to promote red meat intake, and we are not encouraging people who otherwise consume a vegetarian-style eating pattern to begin consuming red meat."

The study is published online at the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It was funded by the Beef Checkoff and the Pork Checkoff, with support from the National Institutes of Health's Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute and a National Institutes of Health pre-doctoral training grant through the Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue.

"Most healthy eating pattern recommendations include a broad statement to reduce red meat intake,'" said Lauren E. O'Connor, lead author and recent doctoral degree recipient. "Our study compared Mediterranean-style eating patterns with red meat intake that is typical in the United States, about 3 ounces per day, versus a commonly recommended intake amount that is 3 ounces twice per week. Overall, heart health indicators improved with both Mediterranean-style eating patterns. Interestingly, though, participants' LDL cholesterol, which is one of the strongest predictors we have to predict the development of cardiovascular disease, improved with typical but not lower red meat intake."

The study assessed the health-promoting effects of a Mediterranean-style eating pattern, without intended weight loss, for adults who are overweight and at risk for developing heart disease. All 41 study participants -- 28 females and 13 males -- completed three study phases. The phases included a five-week period of consuming a Mediterranean-style eating pattern containing three ounces per day of lean, unprocessed red meat, an amount of red meat the typical United States resident consumes; a five-week return to their regular eating pattern; and a five-week period of consuming a Mediterranean-style eating pattern with less red meat, three ounces twice weekly, which is commonly recommended for heart health. The order of the typical and lower red meat interventions were randomly assigned among participants.

"It's also very encouraging that the improvements these people experienced -- which included improvements in blood pressure, blood lipids and lipoproteins -- were noticeable in five weeks," Campbell said.

The Mediterranean-style eating pattern, which was ranked No. 1 by Consumer Reports, is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. A Mediterranean-style eating pattern has clinically proven effects on health especially related to heart health and risks for heart disease such as heart attack or stroke.

"The composition of a Mediterranean-style eating pattern varies across countries and cultures," Campbell said. "What is common across most Mediterranean regions is consumption of olive oil, fruit, vegetables and legumes, but protein sources depend on what country and geographic region. If they live on the coast, they will eat more seafood, but if they live inland they will eat more red meat."


The improving lipids/lipoproteins in only five weeks bit is a hoot for anybody familiar with Dave Feldman's stuff showing you only need about 3 days to make a difference in that department.

Is red meat really down to 3 ounces a day? Incredible that such a small bit of red meat is blamed for so much harm.
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 05:04
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

Also, the qualifier that it be "lean" is amusing.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 05:11
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cotonpal cotonpal is offline
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Plan: very low carb real food
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So much propaganda masquerading as science.
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 05:24
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80613113743.htm



The improving lipids/lipoproteins in only five weeks bit is a hoot for anybody familiar with Dave Feldman's stuff showing you only need about 3 days to make a difference in that department.

Is red meat really down to 3 ounces a day? Incredible that such a small bit of red meat is blamed for so much harm.




I have never beleived that red meat was "bad"......as presented above the study doesnt seem very well designed. Maybe purposely a vague presentation.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 05:29
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
So much propaganda masquerading as science.



Quote:
Notes
This study was funded in part by the Beef Checkoff, the Pork Checkoff, the National Institute of Health's Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue University (5T32DK076540-08), and the National Institute of Health's Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. These organizations had no role in the design or conduct of the study; collection, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or writing of the manuscript.




Quote:
WWC's relationships over the past 2 y include grant funding to support other research projects unrelated to the research presented in this article and/or travel reimbursements to scientific meetings from the Beef Checkoff, Pork Checkoff, National Dairy Council, North Dakota Beef Commission, American Egg Board–Egg Nutrition Center, and Barilla International. WWC also served on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and was a member of the Advisory Council on Nutrition and Healthy Food Choices, Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research. DP-J's relationships over the past 2 y include grant funding to support other research projects unrelated to the research presented in this article and/or travel reimbursements or honoraria from American Egg Board–Egg Nutrition Center, Leprino Foods, National Dairy Council, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, and US Dairy Export Council. DP-J also participates on scientific advisory panels.


As far as

Quote:
These organizations had no role in the design or conduct of the study; collection, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or writing of the manuscript.


goes--it says the organizations didn't design the study, it doesn't say that the organizations didn't know the study design, or weren't aware of earlier similar studies on slightly different diets done by the same authors, etc. before they put their money down. Often results are predictable. Look at the almond studies, you can pull up a whole bunch of studies, all showing the same stupid lipid profile endpoints, after the first couple studies, everybody knew what the results would be for the next ten--a predictable result for another round of 'almonds are a special magic heart healthy food' headlines.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:21
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Also, the qualifier that it be "lean" is amusing.

For all those many people out there who just can't yet accept that saturated fat, as found in foods like meat, isn't the dietary villain it's been made out to be. First, cholesterol now "not a nutrient of concern," next red meat found to more positively affect LDL cholesterol than its absence. Future, public acceptance that saturated fats were wrongly implicated in causing disease? Baby steps?
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 14:43
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Quote:
All 41 study participants -- 28 females and 13 males -- completed three study phases.

That's so randomly specific. From the paper:
Quote:
Fifty individuals were randomized into the study, but 18% (9) dropped out during week 1 of the first intervention. The remaining 41 subjects (28 women and 13 men) completed both interventions (see Supplemental Figure 1).

That's more like it.

Anyways, check insulin. It dropped in both interventions, moreso for Med-Red in male subjects but then again they started with higher insulin. It doesn't make much sense because that same group started with lower insulin for Med-Control, as low as post level for Med-Red. Various other metrics also improved similarly.

Body mass change is interesting because from a low-carb point of view, it's neither low-carb nor lower-carb nor high-fat nor higher-fat, yet there was a drop of about 1kg in both interventions. In my view, 1kg over 5 weeks is quite insignificant, especially when it can go as high as several kgs just in the first week with Atkins induction for example. But then this wasn't a weight loss experiment.

If I could plot a graph to compare this experiment with the A-TO-Z experiment, I'd probably say it matches the other three diets (Ornish, Zone, Learn), but not the Atkins diet, in all things measured, in either arms.

Teaser, it's incredible that such a small amount of red meat is blamed, I agree. But then it's equally incredible that such a small amount of red meat somehow manages to produce an arguably beneficial effect in such a short period. When combined with much older evidence about fresh meat and scurvy and the all-meat trial, to me it suggests that meat has a unique property not found in any other food. For example, in parallel to the advice to eat tons of carbs and little fat, we're also told to eat as little red meat as possible. Then, this latest experiment suggests that even a small amount of meat has a significant effect, further suggesting that the official advice about it is at best completely wrong, and at worst obviously making us sick.

Ima stick with my ribeyes, bacon and eggs fried in lots of butter and lard.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 17:50
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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I know red meat has a good effect on me. I go without for a few days and I miss it.
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  #9   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 18:29
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/175/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 100%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

Quote:
participants' LDL cholesterol, which is one of the strongest predictors we have to predict the development of cardiovascular disease,

NO, NO, NO.

LDL is a horrible predictor of cardio problems. Numerous studies have shown this.
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 19:55
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,310
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
Default

Retract that study!
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