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  #136   ^
Old Wed, May-09-18, 03:32
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Hi Walnut, hope you are feeling well.

You likely found this interview with Jason Fung on 7 days. As he states, there are more studies on the 3-5 day fasts. https://www.rsng.com/categories/mov...-against-cancer

The most coverage in the media was following Dr Valter Longo's study on 3 day fasts.
https://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell...5909(14)00151-9. One example
https://www.forbes.com/sites/steven...m/#2c02e0933c93

8 excellent fasting references following this short article by Dr Champ. https://www.myhealthwire.com/news/breakthroughs/924

EDIT: later found this longer article with more references, this would be a good start to reduce the search results from below only to those most relevant. https://www.canceractive.com/cancer...ink.aspx?n=3408


I have other fasting/ cancer articles if you PM an email. One link was to this interview with Dr Seyfried, you can read the transcript (thankfully) I remember this interview as detailed, but no time to reread it right now.

Searching PubMed there were over 6000 results for cancer and fasting, add 7 day there were still over 250, so depends how sciencey you want to be and how much time to dig through them Maybe add Valter Longo to the search terms cancer and fasting to get a more manageable result? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed...d+fasting+7+day. See EDIT above.

To quote teaser today over in the Dr Fung thread, "Fasting is sexy right now, so we see these studies" Longevity studies for 3,5, and 7 day fasts, will often mention cancer too, leading to these search results. And of course, the IDM website has numerous posts related to autophagy, Cancer and fasting, e.g. https://idmprogram.com/fasting-and-...agy-fasting-25/ The new Obesity Code Network FB Page may be helpful for you.

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, May-09-18 at 05:34.
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  #137   ^
Old Wed, May-09-18, 15:21
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Wow! Thank you so much Janet!
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  #138   ^
Old Thu, May-10-18, 04:13
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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You're welcome. Somehow lost the Seyfried interview link in my edit.
Adding it here (from 3 years ago, it was a controversial interview to say the least)

"Water Fasts" as a Potential Tactic to Beat Cancer
https://thequantifiedbody.net/water...to-beat-cancer/

Although added CancerActive for information and research supporting a specific topic, it includes most complementary and integrative alternate cancer treatments known worldwide, and am concerned it could steer patients away from standard of care with good success rates. Along with info on fasting and Keto there are some pretty flakey treatments, use caution

If I were recently diagnosed, would now consider buying the Ralph Moss Reports to evaluate both conventional and alternative treatments. Heard of this resource from Derek Green, I did not know about him 11 years ago. http://cancerdecisions.com

Last edited by JEY100 : Thu, May-10-18 at 05:27.
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  #139   ^
Old Thu, Jun-07-18, 05:39
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80606132706.htm

Sticking this here because it deals with another aspect of cancer as a metabolic disease.

Quote:
Excess zinc in muscles contributes to wasting syndrome in cancer
Discovery could lead to the development of treatments for a debilitating condition implicated in 30 percent of all cancer deaths

It's estimated that nearly one-third of all cancer deaths are caused not by the cancer itself but by cachexia -- a debilitating muscle-wasting syndrome that affects an estimated 80 percent of advanced cancer patients. Cachexia is linked to reduced tolerance for cancer therapy, poor quality of life, and accelerated death, but there are no effective treatments and its cause is still largely unknown.

A new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center suggests that an overload of zinc in patients' muscles may be the culprit. The findings, published online today in Nature Medicine, could pave the way for the development of drugs to treat or prevent muscle wasting in advanced cancer patients.

Cachexia occurs in many types of cancers, including pancreatic, gastrointestinal, lung, and head and neck cancers. Yet the condition remains poorly understood, due in part to limited research funding in this area, difficulty developing animal models that accurately replicate the condition in human cancer, and a lack of reliable biomarkers to help diagnose cachexia early and monitor its progression during cancer treatment.

"There's a common misconception that cachexia is just a nutritional problem caused by a loss of appetite stemming from the cancer or its treatments," says study leader Swarnali Acharyya, PhD, assistant professor of pathology & cell biology in the Institute of Cancer Genetics at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. "Cachectic patients are typically given appetite stimulants, but these remedies only help temporarily and cannot reverse cachexia. As cachexia continues to break down muscle, patients often become too weak to tolerate standard doses of anti-cancer therapies, and their doctors have to scale back treatment. Cachexia can also weaken the muscles of the diaphragm and the heart, causing many cancer patients to die from respiratory or heart failure. To find better ways of treating this condition, we need to learn more about its underlying cause and the molecular mechanisms associated with this syndrome."

In the study, Acharyya's team looked in the muscles of mice with cachexia to see if they could find differences compared with normal muscles. The analysis revealed greater activity of a protein called ZIP14, which is typically expressed in liver cells to facilitate metal transport but was found to be abnormally expressed in muscles of the cancer models. They also found high levels of ZIP14 in samples of muscle tissue from cancer patients with cachexia, suggesting a link between ZIP14 and cachexia in people.

Excess zinc uptake in muscle leads to muscle wasting in cancer, the researchers found, by breaking down mature muscle cells and preventing stem cells from making new muscle fibers.

The reason why ZIP14 pumps more zinc into muscles in cachexia was traced back to the systemic effects of cancer. The researchers found that two factors -- TNF-alpha and TGF-beta, which are associated with advanced cancer -- increase ZIP14 expression in muscle.

"We often think cancer injures the body by spreading and invading vital organs," Acharyya says. "But cancer can also injure in another way, by releasing substances that affect other areas of the body that are cancer-free. This is an area that is often overlooked in cancer biology research, but addressing it during cancer treatment could have an important impact on patient survival and quality of life."

The discovery of zinc and ZIP14's connection with cachexia may lead to ways to reduce cachexia's impact on patients. In the study, reducing ZIP14 in muscle cells markedly reduced cachexia, suggesting that drugs that inhibit ZIP14 could improve cancer survival and quality of life.

"Zinc is essential for maintaining many functions in our body, and is often taken as a supplement," says Acharyya. "But excess zinc supplementation may not always be a good thing, because we saw that giving excess zinc supplements to mice with tumors accelerated their muscle wasting and weight loss. With more translational studies, clinicians and patients may need to reconsider the practice of using zinc supplements, especially if they have tumors commonly associated with cachexia."

Dr. Acharyya is currently designing strategies to inactivate ZIP14 with Anup Biswas, PhD, one of the lead authors of this study. These efforts could lead to the development of therapies to combat cancer cachexia in the future.


Besides wasting muscle, cachexia can provide fuel for cancer, keeping cancer from feeding/getting material for growth from muscle sounds like a good target. I guess there's also the issue of fuel partitioning, if muscle protein synthesis and energy use goes down.
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  #140   ^
Old Fri, Jun-08-18, 02:45
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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There were many media articles during the ASCO conference this weekend, of the thousands of papers and Press releases, it is always interesting which ones get press and which ones never see the light of day. Unless I missed it, the case studies involving the Ketogenic Diet are the later...so adding them here. http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=480470 To be fair a case study is weak and donít often get press.
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  #141   ^
Old Mon, Jul-09-18, 17:05
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Am I allowed to post this here???
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjhbxT0T9Sk

I raise feed animals.... and cancer runs in my family.......
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  #142   ^
Old Tue, Jul-17-18, 05:09
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Five letters: NAFLD.

They dance around Obesity and Lifestyle, but it doesnít seem that complicated to me.

Liver cancer death rate in US surged 43% in 16 years


CNN https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/17/heal...tudy/index.html

Death rates from liver cancer increased 43% for American adults from 2000 to 2016, according to a report released Tuesday.

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Jul-18-18 at 03:13.
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  #143   ^
Old Tue, Jul-17-18, 09:55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100

Five letters: NAFLD.

They dance around Obesity and Lifestyle, but it doesnít seem that complicated to me.


That's exactly what I thought when I saw the headline.

But you can address NAFLD with diet and nutrients. There's no profit in it.
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  #144   ^
Old Sun, Sep-30-18, 08:24
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80928131255.htm

Quote:
Cancer hijacks the microbiome to glut itself on glucose

Cancer needs energy to drive its out-of-control growth. It gets energy in the form of glucose, in fact consuming so much glucose that one method for imaging cancer simply looks for areas of extreme glucose consumption -- where there is consumption, there is cancer. But how does cancer get this glucose? A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Cancer Cell shows that leukemia undercuts the ability of normal cells to consume glucose, thus leaving more glucose available to feed its own growth.

"Leukemia cells create a diabetic-like condition that reduces glucose going to normal cells, and as a consequence, there is more glucose available for the leukemia cells. Literally, they are stealing glucose from normal cells to drive growth of the tumor," says Craig Jordan, PhD, investigator at University of Colorado Cancer Center, division chief of the Division of Hematology and the Nancy Carroll Allen Professor of Hematology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Like diabetes, cancer's strategies depend on insulin. Healthy cells need insulin to use glucose. In diabetes, either the pancreas under-produces insulin or tissues cannot not respond to insulin and so cells are left starved for energy while glucose builds up in the blood. The current study shows that leukemia goes about creating similar conditions of glucose buildup in two ways.

First, tumor cells trick fat cells into over-producing a protein called IGFBP1. This protein makes healthy cells less sensitive to insulin, meaning that when IGFBP1 is high, it takes more insulin to use glucose than it does when IGFBP1 is low. Unless the supply of insulin goes up, high IGFBP1 means that the glucose consumption of healthy cells goes down. (This protein may also be a link in the chain connecting cancer and obesity: The more fat cells, the more IGFBP1, and the more glucose is available to the cancer.)

Of course, cancer has a second strategy that ensures insulin production does not go up to meet the need created by increased IGFBP1. In fact, cancers turn insulin production down. In large part, they do this in the gut.

"In the course of doing this systemic analysis, we realized that some of the factors that help regulate glucose are made by the gut or bacteria in the gut. We looked there and found that the composition of the microbiome in leukemic animals was different than in control mice," Jordan says.

One major difference in the guts of leukemic mice was the lack of a specific kind of bacteria known as bacteroids. These bacteroids produce short-chain fatty acids that in turn feed the health of cells lining your gut. Without bacteroids, gut health suffers. And the current study shows that without bacteroids, gut health suffers in ways that specifically aid cancer.

One way is the loss of hormones called incretins. When blood glucose gets high, for example after you eat, your gut releases incretins, which tamp down blood glucose, reducing it back into the normal range. Working through the gut, leukemia inactivates these incretins, allowing blood glucose to remain higher than it should. Leukemia also nixes the activity of serotonin. Serotonin is well-known as a "feel good" chemical that helps to regulate mood and is found in many antidepressants. But serotonin is also essential for the manufacture of insulin in the pancreas, and by attacking serotonin, leukemia reduces insulin production (and thus, down the line, glucose use).

The result of less insulin secretion and less insulin sensitivity is that cancer undercuts healthy cells' use of insulin from both sides: Healthy cells need more insulin, just as there is less insulin available. Less insulin use by healthy cells leaves more glucose for the cancer.

"It's a classic parasite trick: Take advantage of something the host does and subvert it for your own purposes," Jordan says.

Interestingly, just as a parasite might eat a host's food leading to malnourishment, cancer's energy theft may play a role in the fatigue and weight loss common in cancer patients.

"The fairly prevalent observation is that cancer patients have a condition called cachexia, basically wasting away -- you lose weight. If cancers are inducing systemic changes that result in depletion of normal energy stores, this could be part of that story," Jordan says.

However, Jordan and colleagues including first author Haobin Ye, PhD, not only showed how leukemia dysregulates healthy cells' glucose consumption, but also showed how to "re-regulate" this consumption.

"When we administered agents to recalibrate the glucose system, we found that we could restore glucose regulation and slow the growth of leukemia cells," Ye says.

These "agents" were surprisingly low-tech. One was serotonin. Another was tributyrin, a fatty acid found in butter and other foods. Serotonin supplementation replaced the serotonin nixed by leukemia and tributyrin helped to replace the short-chain fatty acids that were absent due to loss of bacteroids.

The group calls the combination Ser-Tri therapy. And they show that it is more than a theory. Ser-Tri therapy led to the recovery of insulin levels and reduction of IGFPB1. And leukemic mice treated with Ser-Tri therapy lived longer than those without. Twenty-two days after leukemia was introduced in mice, all of the untreated mice had died, while more than half of the mice treated with Ser-Tri were still alive.

The continuing line of work shows that cancer may depend on the ability to out-compete healthy cells for limited energy. Healthy tissues have strategies to regulate insulin, glucose and other factors controlling energy consumption; cancer cells have strategies to subvert this regulation with the goal of making more energy available for their own use.

"We now have evidence that what we observed in our mouse models is also true for leukemia patients." Ye says.

Understanding these mechanisms that cancer uses to unbalance the body's system of energy in their favor is helping doctors and researchers learn to thumb the scale in favor of healthy cells.

"This furthers the notion that you can do things systemically to disfavor leukemia cells and favor normal tissue," Jordan says. "This could be part of limiting growth of tumors."

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  #145   ^
Old Sun, Sep-30-18, 08:43
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s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
Wonderful article.

It goes into the history of the failed, but still not dead, genetic theory of cancer and then into the metabolic theory of cancer.
The OP article reads exactly like the 2014 book Tripping Over Cancer.
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  #146   ^
Old Sun, Sep-30-18, 09:24
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Great find teaser! Thank you. The PubMed Search I have been watching for years is Cancer AND Ketogenic, so relevant studies like this one are at an earlier step.

Quote:
The OP article reads exactly like the 2014 book Tripping Over Cancer.
because it is the same author but I can always use the "short take" of books (Tripping Over the Truth) for my list of cancer articles. Thanks, Nancy.

Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, Oct-01-18 at 02:42.
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  #147   ^
Old Sun, Sep-30-18, 12:35
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Quote:
However, Jordan and colleagues including first author Haobin Ye, PhD, not only showed how leukemia dysregulates healthy cells' glucose consumption, but also showed how to "re-regulate" this consumption.

"When we administered agents to recalibrate the glucose system, we found that we could restore glucose regulation and slow the growth of leukemia cells," Ye says.

These "agents" were surprisingly low-tech. One was serotonin. Another was tributyrin, a fatty acid found in butter and other foods. Serotonin supplementation replaced the serotonin nixed by leukemia and tributyrin helped to replace the short-chain fatty acids that were absent due to loss of bacteroids.

The group calls the combination Ser-Tri therapy. And they show that it is more than a theory. Ser-Tri therapy led to the recovery of insulin levels and reduction of IGFPB1. And leukemic mice treated with Ser-Tri therapy lived longer than those without. Twenty-two days after leukemia was introduced in mice, all of the untreated mice had died, while more than half of the mice treated with Ser-Tri were still alive.


If this is true that we can supplement with some agents and cure cancer, this will put the whole cancer industry out of business for good with their radiation and Chemotherapy.

That's a mighty fight as other cancer doctors using alternate therapy have learned. Dr. Burzynski has been fighting for years and has even had to open his own clinic having been ousted from the highly acclaimed MD Anderson cancer hospital.
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/scie...blications.html
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  #148   ^
Old Sun, Sep-30-18, 19:43
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I realize this is about cancer research and alternative treatment. However, my own research is in the neurological diseases which afflict the elderly.

I bring this up because ketogenic diets are being used to treat people with epilepsy (children) Parkinson's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis (Dr. Eades) and Alzheimer's Disease (Dr. Bredesen.) It appears to be possible that leaving off sugars and grains can keep us healthy.
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  #149   ^
Old Wed, Oct-03-18, 04:09
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Dr. Colin Champ's September newsletter included a new Basic Lifestyle Guide, specifically after treatment for breast cancer, more generally for hormonal cancers, but much of it applies to good lifestyle choices following any cancer treatment. His newsletters included other tips, observations, and news about new studies on cancer. This was a good bonus today, link includes a 10 page .pdf to print.

http://colinchamp.com/a-basic-lifes...ncer-treatment/

http://colinchamp.com/wp-content/up...east-Cancer.pdf


Jean, there is a Keto for Cancer FB page I follow, admin will often post stories about aging and Alzheimer's as they overlap, recently a story about an Australian woman who reversed Alzheimers.

Same Admin is developing a website collecting all this research, this will be a great resource when it launches. https://www.facebook.com/KetoCancerDiet/?fref=ts

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Oct-03-18 at 04:27.
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