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  #856   ^
Old Mon, Apr-16-18, 14:16
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,063
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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I, too, have recently been eating more protein with positive effects, and I believe as we age, it's a healthy thing to gradually consume more. I believe it was during the Low Carb Breckenridge presentations that a couple presenters argued the wisdom for increased protein consumption as we move into our 50s and beyond. It has been working for me without jeopardizing being in ketosis, which I have been maintaining most of the time over the past few years.

Edited to add: Dr. Ben Bikman's presentation at LC Breckenridge on Protein and Keto was stellar.

Last edited by GRB5111 : Mon, Apr-16-18 at 14:46.
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  #857   ^
Old Yesterday, 10:08
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Maintaining
Posts: 3,192
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 62 inches
BF:25% (up from 22%)
Progress: 100%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
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Anybody here doing the IDM membership? If so, insight would be appreciated, as it's so much more expensive than Diet Doctor.
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  #858   ^
Old Yesterday, 12:19
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is offline
Posts: 6,447
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/205/210 Male 5' 11"
BF:Energy Unleashed
Progress: 102%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
Anybody here doing the IDM membership? If so, insight would be appreciated, as it's so much more expensive than Diet Doctor.

I'm not a member of IDM, but I did dig into what it is up with it (just out of curiosity). What it looks like to me is that IDM offers live (one-on-one and group) support, much like Dr. Westman's Heal Clinics program (which is also on the pricey side). Dietdoctor.com is purely informational. Membership there pays for the limited resources needed to support the website. One-on-one/group coaching would be more labor intensive, thus justifying the extra cost. IMO - those of us here who have been doing this for some time would likely make better coaches than program participants of IDM or Heal Clinics. I suspect that the target audience of those more costly programs are people who need to be told that fruit juice, granola bars, and Special K cereal are not healthy and not permitted on a LCHF program.
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  #859   ^
Old Yesterday, 19:43
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
Maintaining
Posts: 3,192
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 62 inches
BF:25% (up from 22%)
Progress: 100%
Location: Nevada Desert, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khrussva
I suspect that the target audience of those more costly programs are people who need to be told that fruit juice, granola bars, and Special K cereal are not healthy and not permitted on a LCHF program.
You're probably right. I'm part of the FB Obesity Code group, and they seem to be having a contest every day as to who can NOT eat the longest. Not judging, but it's more a "how to" thing IMO. Whatever floats their boats.

In the near future there will be a need for Fung, Bredesen and the LCHF doctors to come together to address the variety of illnesses brought about by the diet people have been told to eat for the past 50 years. I only wish the perpetrators would have to PAY!

Evidence of dementia are already being discovered in deceased children's brains.
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  #860   ^
Old Yesterday, 20:18
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,780
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I, too, have recently been eating more protein with positive effects, and I believe as we age, it's a healthy thing to gradually consume more.
How much have you bumped up your protein intake and what positive effects have you seen?
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  #861   ^
Old Yesterday, 20:59
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,063
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdra
How much have you bumped up your protein intake and what positive effects have you seen?

deirdra - I had cut back to approximately 85-100 grams per day, as I was under the impression that it would enable me to maintain my weight better while staying in ketosis. After doing some research and watching Dr. Ben Bickman's excellent presentation about protein and keto at the Low Carb Breckenridge event, I increased protein consumption to a range of 125-140 grams per day by going back to the daily protein guideline of 1.5-2 grams protein per Kg of lean body weight. I'm 66, and the message from a few sources was that as we age, it's good to consume a healthy amount of protein. I probably cut back very slightly on fat; although, I still enjoy eating good healthy fat. With the increase in protein, I've lost weight, not rapidly, but easily have dropped a few pounds, and my pants are now looser around the waist. I used to grill a 1 pound NY Strip and eat it over successive evenings to get two dinners out of it. Now, if I'm hungy, I just eat the whole thing. Sometimes, my hunger just shuts off, so I have some leftovers, but I'm not purposely limiting protein any longer, and I seem to be responding positively by dropping some weight and having a good amount of energy. Getting in regular and consistent exercise is a complementary activity as well.
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  #862   ^
Old Today, 07:39
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 10,319
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
Evidence of dementia are already being discovered in deceased children's brains.


That is a stark fact about how far Western Civilization has gone towards killing us through a combination of greed, ignorance, and ego.

The part which baffles me most is that they are dying too. This is killing their grandparents, their kids, themselves. Are they truly so greedy they are not pursuing alternatives because it would make their stock price go down?
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  #863   ^
Old Today, 13:22
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 11,912
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I, too, have recently been eating more protein with positive effects, and I believe as we age, it's a healthy thing to gradually consume more. I believe it was during the Low Carb Breckenridge presentations that a couple presenters argued the wisdom for increased protein consumption as we move into our 50s and beyond. It has been working for me without jeopardizing being in ketosis, which I have been maintaining most of the time over the past few years.

Edited to add: Dr. Ben Bikman's presentation at LC Breckenridge on Protein and Keto was stellar.


Just watched this. Very nearly restored my faith in humanity, somebody out there is actually going out of their way to make supportable statements.

His suggestion that if glucose is constantly elevated, lowering protein in favour of fat makes sense--insulin/glucagon response to protein being dependent on background glycemia--sounds good.

Also--the comment that red blood cells are the only cells that absolutely need glucose, there being no evidence that brain cells can't run on alternate fuels is interesting, I've wondered about that for a long time. The old fasting studies give 20-30 grams or so as the minimum glucose requirement for the brain--which just happens to be the amount of glucose people could be making from glycerol and the breakdown of protein at the rates that occur deep into a fast. I've wondered whether this is a matter of efficiency--some protein is going to be wasted on a daily basis, can you expect a perfectly efficient system? There just seems to be an assumption that whatever terminal oxidation of glucose, or at least of possible gluconeogenic substrate, that occurs on a daily basis at that point must be the minimum requirement, maybe minimum oxidation would be a better description.
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  #864   ^
Old Today, 13:40
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,063
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Just watched this. Very nearly restored my faith in humanity, somebody out there is actually going out of their way to make supportable statements.

His suggestion that if glucose is constantly elevated, lowering protein in favour of fat makes sense--insulin/glucagon response to protein being dependent on background glycemia--sounds good.

Supportable statements? Who'd have thought . . .

I believe this is one of the key points in his message in that with elevated glucose, lowering protein reduces "background glycemia."
Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Also--the comment that red blood cells are the only cells that absolutely need glucose, there being no evidence that brain cells can't run on alternate fuels is interesting, I've wondered about that for a long time. The old fasting studies give 20-30 grams or so as the minimum glucose requirement for the brain--which just happens to be the amount of glucose people could be making from glycerol and the breakdown of protein at the rates that occur deep into a fast. I've wondered whether this is a matter of efficiency--some protein is going to be wasted on a daily basis, can you expect a perfectly efficient system? There just seems to be an assumption that whatever terminal oxidation of glucose, or at least of possible gluconeogenic substrate, that occurs on a daily basis at that point must be the minimum requirement, maybe minimum oxidation would be a better description.

Yeah, RBCs have no mitochondria, so it goes to reason that there's a requirement for glucose.

Efficiency of protein utilization is a valid thought, as to your point, it's more likely we do not have a perfectly efficient system, and more likely that inefficiencies continue to occur as we age. Increasing protein consumption based on certain factors such as age as a compensatory mechanism makes sense in this case.
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