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  #136   ^
Old Wed, Jun-20-07, 10:54
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Scientist's endorsement of bisphenol A under review

No more health risk than tofu, doctor says

MARTIN MITTELSTAEDT
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
June 20, 2007 at 4:41 AM EDT

The head of the Health Canada scientific team studying the safety of bisphenol A has been abruptly reassigned, while the department investigates claims he is too biased in favour of the chemical to objectively analyze it.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/serv...eandHealth/home
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  #137   ^
Old Sat, Jun-23-07, 07:59
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Every plastic product that has ever been manufactured still exists

According to the Monterey County Weekly, “every plastic product that has ever been manufactured still exists,” making up 10 percent of California’s garbage. The article asserts that “plastic is not biodegradable, but rather photodegradable,” leaving little plastic shards to disperse throughout the ocean, which marine life often mistake for food.
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com...ver_story/print
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  #138   ^
Old Wed, Jun-27-07, 07:09
Samuel Samuel is offline
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http://scienceblogs.com/moleculeoft..._a_now_with.php

Tetrabromobisphenol A (Now with bromine!)

Category:
Posted on: June 26, 2007 7:25 PM, by Molecule of the Day

Bisphenol A is one ingredient that makes polycarbonate and epoxies work the way they do. A lot of people have fretted and expressed some concern about bisphenol A bioaccumulating - I can just about guarantee you're toting some around in your fat. More persistent and toxic to aquatic life is a derivative of bisphenol A - tetrabromobisphenol A.


Hanging a lot of halogens off of a compound is a pretty good way of making a flame retardant - we used to make amazing fire extinguishers with stuff called Halon (that link's highly recommended). I am told they were so good you could set up flame sensors and fill a room with them before a fire barely became visible (I'm talking lighting a match). They also required a low enough concentration that they could be used to extinguish a fire, while keeping enough oxygen in a room to support life.

Sadly, they destroy ozone quite effectively, so they were pretty comprehensively banned. Now we flood rooms with suffocating amounts of CO2. Halon may be the most effective fire suppressant the world will ever know - it is hard to conceive of something that works by as effective a mechanism.

Anyway. Tetrabromobisphenol A is like a solid halon - the idea is you mix a few percent in with your regular bisphenol A and make a flame-retardant polymer. There are the aforementioned tox and persistence problems, however. Always a trade-off...
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  #139   ^
Old Wed, Jun-27-07, 07:40
tom sawyer tom sawyer is offline
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I believe Halon is already off the market isn't it? There are still brominated flame retardants used though.

And tofu should be banned. hehe
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  #140   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-07, 08:33
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Here is a new article about your friend Vom Saal
http://www.scientistlive.com/18117/...f-disease.thtml
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  #141   ^
Old Tue, Jul-10-07, 15:15
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Tue Jul 10 09:10:53 2007 Pacific Time

Strong Support for Shareholder Resolution at Bed Bath & Beyond Encourages Company to Replace Toxic Chemicals in Consumer Products

http://newswire.ascribe.org/cgi-bin...r=2007&public=0
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  #142   ^
Old Wed, Aug-01-07, 09:24
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Reported August 1, 2007

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., demonstrated exposure within the womb to bisphenol A (BPA) -- a ubiquitous chemical used in the production of plastics -- caused noticeable changes in the offspring without changing any of their genes. They also found taking folic acid or an active ingredient in soy called genistein during pregnancy protects the offspring from negative effects of BPA.

http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_c...m?storyid=16805
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  #143   ^
Old Sat, Aug-04-07, 11:18
Samuel Samuel is offline
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August 03, 2007
Thirty-eight scientists said on Thursday that Bisphenol A, an ingredient in hard plastics and one of the most common chemicals in the world, is probably causing reproductive disorders in people.

The unusually strong statement was published online in the journal Reproductive Technology, where the scientists reviewed 700 studies before concluding that the people are regularly exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) levels above those shown to harm lab animals. The article was accompanied by an NIH study showing that newborn animals exposed to BPA suffer uterine damage, which in women is linked to reproductive diseases and cancers.

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/...ductive-di.html

======================================================================== ===

The debate over the safety of Bisphenol A continues to heat up with a number of new studies being published and the establishment of a government panel to review the data.

http://www.loe.org/shows/segments.h...031&segmentID=4
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  #144   ^
Old Thu, Aug-09-07, 07:16
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Default Nation briefs: BPA risk downplayed

Nation briefs: BPA risk downplayed


BPA risk downplayed

ALEXANDRIA, Va. | A government scientific advisory panel Wednesday played down the risk to humans from BPA, or bisphenol A, a hormone-mimicking chemical that a panel of experts last week called a “great cause for concern.”

A 12-member panel convened to advise the National Toxicology Program said it had “minimal” and “negligible” concerns about most of the ways humans are exposed to the chemical, also known as BPA. The panel called for additional research. BPA is used in plastic food containers, baby bottles, soft drink cans and many other consumer products.
======================================================================== ===

Panel: No Strong Signs of Plastic Hazard; `Some Concern' for Young Children

WASHINGTON - A federal advisory panel says it's found no strong evidence of health hazards to adults from a chemical commonly found in plastics but says there is reason for "some concern" among children and fetuses.

Exposure could be linked to neural or behavioral problems.

At issue is a chemical called bisphenol A, which is found in products ranging from baby bottles to coatings inside food cans. Because research has linked the chemical to health problems in animals, the National Toxicology Program appointed an expert panel to review the science. The final results will be used by regulatory agencies in setting safety standards.

Meanwhile, critics are denouncing the findings, contending the review is skewed in favor of the plastics industry.
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  #145   ^
Old Sun, Aug-12-07, 14:41
Samuel Samuel is offline
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Are we back to square one?

Safety of polycarbonate baby bottles reconfirmed

The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA), which represents the leading manufacturers of baby bottles in the United States is aware of the panel evaluation of bisphenol A, organized by the Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR).


"The Panel's conclusions reaffirm the safety of plastic baby bottles," said Robert Waller, President of The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA)."

"These findings validate the Food and Drug Administration's conclusions and the conclusions of governments and independent scientists worldwide that polycarbonate plastic baby bottles are safe."
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