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  #106   ^
Old Wed, Jun-07-17, 19:27
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Mintaka - I am so glad that you are doing so well. I do not have cancer but my 15 year old granddaughter was recently diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, an aggressive bone cancer. She is undergoing a brutal chemo regime, 5 days of in hospital chemo every 3 weeks for a year. Since I am her grandmother not her parent (she is my son's daughter) I don't get any say in her treatment. I would not suggest to her parents that she doesn't need chemo but I wish I could suggest to them that a low carb diet could be helpful. I have mentioned it but I have to tread very lightly. I wish I could do more. It's frustrating, to say the least.

Jean
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  #107   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 04:21
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Mintaka Mintaka is offline
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Oh, Jean that is horrid news. I have never heard of it. Only 15. She has youth and vigor on her side. Her parents are probably beside themselves.
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  #108   ^
Old Mon, Jun-19-17, 13:50
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JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Another great talk on You Tube by Dr. Colin Champ at The IHMC...his second on Cancer and Nutrition. This one is titled:
Cancer Prevention Through Diet - Tangible Takeaways

https://youtu.be/EWt1HNudyKM

He starts by reviewing many of studies that drive common dietary cancer advice , e.g. High dietary fat increases breast cancer risk, and how they were wrong. Like the saturated fat studies and Taubes criticism of those epidemiological studies in light of the new AHA advisory, he shows where they went wrong. Trans fats and Omega -6 fats, especially when heated, are a problem; the saturated fats, can be a healthy part of an anti-cancer diet. The end of his talk are the "Tangible Takeways"...what should you eat? What does he eat? And not eat (fasting is a key component in the cancer diet world) For the possibility of cancer prevention?

I'm a big fan of Dr Champ. His first lecture at IHMC, Augmenting Cancer Therapy with Diet: Have We Found a Sweet Spot? and his recent STEM-talk interview are also good. https://www.ihmc.us/stemtalks/ Episode 18, The right Nutrition and Exercise can help treat cancer.

Last edited by JEY100 : Tue, Jun-20-17 at 11:13.
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  #109   ^
Old Wed, Aug-16-17, 10:50
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JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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There is so much going on with Cancer and the Ketogenic Diet, hardly know where to start when updating this thread.

The article that may have the most traction is a new one at DietDoctor.
Quote:
Can a Keto Diet Treat Brain Cancer?

Can a ketogenic diet help brain cancer patients like Senator John McCain? Emerging research — and some dramatic patient stories — suggest it might.

When news broke in mid July that US Senator John McCain had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer, neuro-oncology researcher Dr. Adrienne C. Scheck, PhD, tried to get a message to the McCain family in Arizona. She posted on his daughter’s group Facebook page and linked to research she has conducted through her role as an associate professor of neurobiology at Barrow Neurological Institute, in Phoenix Arizona, where McCain lives.

Scheck’s message to McCain: Try the ketogenic diet along with the standard therapy of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.

Over the last decade, Scheck has been studying the effect of altering cancer cell metabolism, specifically with the ketogenic diet, to improve survival and minimize side effects for patients with malignant brain tumours. On July 14, 2017, McCain received the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a notoriously deadly cancer that arises in the glia, the connective tissue of the brain. GBM has a grave prognosis, with an average survival time of 18 months from diagnosis. For McCain, a nine-hour surgery removed a large tumor above his left eye on the day his cancer was diagnosed. Then, in the first week of August, he started radiation and chemotherapy, according to media reports.1
The connection between keto and cancer

Says Scheck (pictured to the right): “Based on our research, I definitely think someone with a GBM should go on a therapeutic ketogenic diet as soon as possible, in addition to standard therapy. Our pre-clinical research suggests that it potentiates both radiation and chemotherapy, and can enhance the anti-tumour immune response. Even ketones alone can have this effect in cell culture. There is nothing to lose by trying it.”2

So far, Scheck has not heard from the McCain family, likely, she feels, because they are being inundated with all forms of advice and because many people, including physicians, wrongly lump the ketogenic diet in with “fad” diets that have no scientific basis. But Scheck stresses the ketogenic diet for cancer is no fad. “This is not a ‘diet’ in the typical sense of the word. It is a regimented metabolic therapy with quite a bit of peer-reviewed science behind,” she says.

In fact, Scheck not only has conducted a number of promising studies in mouse models of the disease, she is the principal investigator of a current clinical trial with GBM patients, using the ketogenic diet plus radiation and chemotherapy. The clinical trial has two goals: to show that patients can tolerate the diet and maintain low blood glucose and high blood ketone levels; and to see if patient survival is prolonged.3

Scheck’s study is one of 10 clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov, now studying the role of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of glioblastoma, eight of which are still actively recruiting. The studies are being led by teams in three other US locations as well as China, Germany, and the UK.

Taking into account other types of cancer — including lung, breast, pancreatic, prostate and melanoma — a total of 23 clinical trials are currently registered at clinicaltrials.gov that are investigating the ketogenic diet as an adjunct to standard cancer therapy. Over the last decade, research investigating the ketogenic’s diet role in basic cancer research and in emerging therapies has burgeoned, with more than 170 studies or theoretical papers currently in the research literature. The number is increasing each month.

How carbs can fuel cancer

At the heart of argument for using the ketogenic diet to help combat cancer is the fact that cancers need glucose — a great deal of it — to fuel their rapid growth. In fact, that is precisely how a PET scan is used to diagnose cancer: an injection of radioactive sugar lights up the malignant cancer cells because they use glucose at a much higher rate than normal cells. Glutamine, which is an amino acid created from the breakdown of proteins, can also fuel cancer growth.4

Starving cancer cells of the glucose and glutamine they need to grow, and using ketones instead as fuel for our cells is the conceptual theory behind the ketogenic diet as an adjunct to cancer treatment. “Normal cells have the flexibility to switch to ketones for energy, cancer cells do not,” explains Dr. Thomas Seyfried, PhD, who is a professor of biology at Boston College (pictured to the right).

Seyfried is the author of the influential 2012 book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease. In that book, as well as in recent research papers, he sets out evidence that cancer is a disturbance of cellular energy metabolism, particularly linked to abnormalities in the structure and function of the mitochondria.5
In a 2015 paper, Seyfried and his colleagues specifically promote using metabolic cancer therapy —i.e the ketogenic diet — as a treatment for glioblastoma. “The goal is to restrict GBM cells of glucose, their main energy substrate,” says Seyfried. This chronic starvation of the fuel they need to grow, stresses and weakens the cancer cells, and if not killing them outright, makes them much more vulnerable to treatments such as radiation, chemotherapy drugs or hyperbaric oxygen. “It is like a one-two punch, stressing them with starvation by ketones, then hitting them while they are down,” said Seyfried.

This one-two punch concept —which Seyfried and his colleagues call “Press-Pulse” theory, was recently detailed in their February 2017 paper. The conceptual framework is to stress the cancer by starving it of glucose and suppressing insulin signaling (the press), then making a sudden strike with hyperbaric oxygen, metabolic-based drugs or milder doses of chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation (the pulse.)6
Professor D’Agostino’s lab

D'Agostino
“Denying cancer cells glucose is like taking the foot off the gas pedal,” explains co-author Dominic D’Agostino, an associate professor of molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida and a research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. D’Agostino’s extensive research on the ketogenic diet has also been featured in several Diet Doctor videos (see right and below).

D’Agostino decade-long research has been focused on nutritional neuroscience — how the brain changes in response to dietary influences. He started by studying the ability of the ketogenic diet and ketone supplementation to help prevent seizures associated with central nervous system oxygen toxicity, a limitation of US Navy SEAL divers who use recircuit breathers.

Now his lab, specifically with research associate Dr. Angela Poff, is investigating the role of nutritional ketosis as an adjuvant in cancer therapy. Dr. Poff’s video about exploiting cancer metabolism using ketosis is a popular video on the Diet Doctor site.

D'Agostino
D’Agostino says their hypothesis is that glucose, insulin, and inflammation are all closely linked to cancer growth and to cancer treatment and prevention; they are tightly associated with the metabolic health of cells. “While the current dominant theory of cancer’s origins are that it arises through mutations in cellular DNA, the stability of DNA is strongly correlated to the functioning of the mitochondria and oxidative stress,”D’ Agostino says. “Nutritional ketosis with periodic fasting supports healthy mitochondrial functioning, autophagy (cellular recycling), suppression of oxidative stress, suppression of insulin signaling and reduction in specific pro-inflammatory pathways.”7
D’Agostino stresses that research on the ketogenic diet and cancer is still in its infancy. “We need more clinical data about how best to apply these concepts to the patient with GBM,” he cautions. “However, it is very reasonable for someone with a diagnosis of GBM —with an average 12-18 months to live — to implement a ketogenic diet (with a qualified nutritionist) to their standard therapy.”

Stories of controlling brain cancer with keto

Pablo Kelly, 28, from Devon, UK (pictured to the right), couldn’t agree more. He was diagnosed with GBM in 2014 and credits the ketogenic diet with saving his life. “My GBM was declared inoperable because of its location in my brain, in the parietal lobe, with a tendril going into my motor cortex,” said Kelly, who soon after the diagnosis began a restricted calorie ketogenic diet.

He credits his three years of strict keto eating, as well as supplementing with exogenous ketones, MCT oil and anti-inflammatory supplements, with shrinking his tumour enough so that 90 % could be removed by an awake craniotomy earlier this year. A MRI scan in May shows the cancer has not grown, says Kelly, who connects with people through his open Facebook page, Pablos Journey Through a Brain Tumour, and through media stories, which have been shared by thousands. “Three years ago I had to search really hard to find people who were doing ketogenic for GBM,” says Kelly who these days is regularly contacted by people around the world hoping for more information and help to try keto for their brain tumor. “I want to inspire as many people as possible.”8

Canadian teenager Adam Sorenson’s (pictured to the right together with his father Brad)9 journey with GBM and the ketogenic diet is another inspiring anecdotal story. He was diagnosed with Stage IV GBM in September 2013, the day after his 13th birthday. The tumor was the size of a baseball and uniformly fatal.10

Doctors performed surgery to remove as much as possible, but his father, Brad, did extensive research to try to improve his son’s odds for survival. “The overriding rules I set was that it had to be safe, it had to have at least some clinical trial data published, and it had to be accessible.” His parents also consulted with Dr. Jong Rho, an expert in the ketogenic diet for epilepsy, and a former mentor of Dr. Scheck at the Barrow Neurological Institute who had been recruited to the Alberta Children’s Hospital to the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the University of Calgary.11 The Sorensons also consulted with Drs. Seyfried, D’Agostino and Scheck.

They came up with a protocol that included a ketogenic diet consisting of 80% fat, 15% protein and 5% carbohydrates combined with radiation treatment, hyperbaric oxygen, and the drug metformin. Four months after starting the treatment, Adam had an MRI scan in February of 2014 that showed no visible tumor. Thirteen subsequent MRIs to this day have remained clear of cancer. Adam has remained on the ketogenic diet and metformin ever since. “It is basically really low carbs with lots of whipping cream, eggs, pork, nuts and seeds,” says his dad.

In a compelling video, Adam says the diet is not always easy as a teenager, especially when out with friends. “When I realized I was not going to be able to eat some of my favourite foods like pizza and candy, I was a little sad. But I thought, it’s going to help me live.”

Adam was a keynote speaker last November at the Global Symposium on Ketogenic Therapies, held in Banff Alberta and sponsored by the Charlie Foundation for Ketogenic Therapies. The foundation began as an organization focused on ketogenic diet for epilepsy control, but has now branched into its use in brain cancer, autism and other cognitive disorders.

When asked what he would say to families dealing with GBM, Brad Sorenson said, “I am really hesitant to act as the role of a doctor. I am concerned that I could add to a stressful situation. I don’t want to give them false hope.”

Sorenson, who is the CEO and founder of two biotechnology companies notes however, that the keto diet seems to be most effective when started before radiation and that steroids, which are almost uniformly given to brain cancer patients, can interfere with effective ketosis. “Adam’s protocol invites a lot of pushback from doctors.” So Sorenson simply tells people what they did for Adam, shares a slide deck with their protocol and its rationale with references, and encourages them to find a qualified dietitian.

“I do not believe the diet alone is a game changer but I do believe it helps improve the potency and efficacy of other cancer treatments,” says Brad. “I am very aware that Adam’s story is anecdotal. But I am totally confident that if we had gone with the standard of care, Adam would not be alive today.”


Anne Mullens



If interested in this topic, you might read it on the DD website so you can open the references to studies. This article is also followed by the videos the website already has on Cancer.

Dr. Jason Fung has a new post on Obesity and Cancer, first part of series.
https://intensivedietarymanagement....ancer-cancer-1/




The Single Cause, Single Cure foundation mentioned on this and another thread has changed name. http://www.foundationformetaboliccancertherapies.com

Quote:
We have decided to change the name of our foundation from The Single Cause Single Cure Foundation, to The Foundation for Metabolic Cancer Therapies. We think this name better reflects our ethos. It was pointed out that perhaps Single Cause Single Cure could be interpreted as encouraging patients to seek a single cure. That is not the case. Research has clearly shown that combinations of metabolic acting therapies are synergistic, and have outcomes that far exceed any single agent. We have granted research awarded to investigate synergist “cocktails” of metabolic therapies. The preclinical work is very encouraging. Our goal is to empower patients with these largely non-toxic therapies that may greatly enhance standard of care.


The new second edition of Tripping Over the Truth seems to be picking up steam, 308 five star reviews.

There was a negative Systematic review: isocaloric ketogenic dietary regimes for cancer patients. recently published in Medical Oncology.

Quote:
Abstract
The efficacy and benefits of ketogenic diets (KD) have recently been gaining worldwide and remain a controversial topic in oncology. This systematic review therefore presents and evaluates the clinical evidence on isocaloric KD dietary regimes and reveals that evidence supporting the effects of isocaloric ketogenic dietary regimes on tumor development and progression as well as reduction in side effects of cancer therapy is missing. Furthermore, an array of potential side effects should be carefully considered before applying KD to cancer patients. In regard to counseling cancer patients considering a KD, more robust and consistent clinical evidence is necessary before the KD can be recommended for any single cancer diagnosis or as an adjunct therapy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28353094


....but that has brought forth comments with lists of studies that DO show benefit. Here's one from Hungary.

Comment on “Systematic Review: Isocaloric Ketogenic Dietary Regimes for Cancer Patients” by Erickson et al
Csaba Tóth, Andrea Dabóczi, Madhvi Chanrai, Zsófia Clemens
http://pubs.sciepub.com/jcrt/5/3/2/#Cor

and Beneficial effects of ketogenic diets for cancer patients: a realist review with focus on evidence and confirmation.

Klement RJ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28653283

Quote:
Abstract
Ketogenic diets (KDs) have gained popularity among patients and researchers alike due to their putative anti-tumor mechanisms. However, the question remains which conclusions can be drawn from the available human data thus far concerning the safety and efficacy of KDs for cancer patients. A realist review utilizing a matrix analytical approach was conducted according to the RAMESES publication standards. All available human studies were systematically analyzed and supplemented with results from animal studies. Evidence and confirmation were treated as separate concepts. In total, 29 animal and 24 human studies were included in the analysis. The majority of animal studies (72%) yielded evidence for an anti-tumor effect of KDs. Evidential support for such effects in humans was weak and limited to individual cases, but a probabilistic argument shows that the available data strengthen the belief in the anti-tumor effect hypothesis at least for some individuals. Evidence for pro-tumor effects was lacking completely. Feasibility of KDs for cancer patients has been shown in various contexts. The probability of achieving an anti-tumor effect seems greater than that of causing serious side effects when offering KDs to cancer patients. Future controlled trials would provide stronger evidence for or against the anti-tumor effect hypothesis.


Dr. Nasha Winters has done quite a few interviews/podcasts, but not all with the usual LC podcasters. Check Resources/Media on her website.

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Aug-16-17 at 16:16.
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  #110   ^
Old Thu, Aug-17-17, 09:52
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
"But I am totally confident that if we had gone with the standard of care, Adam would not be alive today.”


I am sure he is right. They were offered no hope. It's not a miracle; it's science.

Which means it is accessible to everyone.
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  #111   ^
Old Thu, Sep-14-17, 08:31
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Dr Fung, in a few weeks, is up to Part 5 of his new Cancer series, and only at the point of reviewing the Proximate and Ultimate Causes of genetic mutations that lead to Cancer. Same arguments he used when explaining obesity or the failure of CICO. He is a kidney specialist, but maybe his style of writing from outside the oncology world is what is needed. His Fasting series went to 29 parts, who knows where this will end up. https://idmprogram.com/cancer-proxi...auses-cancer-5/
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