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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Aug-17-02, 10:04
Dana114's Avatar
Dana114 Dana114 is offline
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Posts: 29
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 185/143/145 Female 5' 7 1/2"
BF:43%/19.6%/19.6%
Progress: 105%
Location: Texas
Default Meat the root of all evil?

My cleaning lady and her family have gone on the Hallalulah Acres Diet [a strict vegetarian diet] and have decided that meat is the source of all evil. This is a religiously based diet that is premised entirely on one passage in the Bible to the detriment of many others which contradict her interpretation.

They have been taught at church that meat causes cancer and every ailment known to mankind, including back pain!! I know there are studies that link meat to a higher incidence of cancer, HOWEVER, those studies alway include processed meats that contain nitrates. Does anyone have an article/study that I can use to convince her that meat is not the cancerous killer she believes? Can you point me in the right direction?
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Aug-17-02, 10:48
DrByrnes DrByrnes is offline
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Posts: 51
 
Plan: Life Without Bread
Stats: 176/172/172
BF:12%
Progress: 100%
Default The Hallelujah Diet

You may want to point out other Bible passages which clearly show that eating fatty meat was highly prized: Isa. 25:6, Gen. 45:17-18. And also don't forget that the first acceptable sacrifice to Yahweh was an animal. Cain's offering of plant foods was rejected.

You can also read the section on cancer in my vegetarian myths article posted on my site, noted below.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Aug-17-02, 10:53
Dana114's Avatar
Dana114 Dana114 is offline
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Posts: 29
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 185/143/145 Female 5' 7 1/2"
BF:43%/19.6%/19.6%
Progress: 105%
Location: Texas
Default

Thank you! I found your website very informative and appreciate all your input.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 11:30
Kent's Avatar
Kent Kent is offline
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Posts: 356
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 256/220/215 Male 78 inches
BF:36/28/20
Progress: 88%
Location: Colorado
Default

Hi Dana,

You could send your cleaning lady to my non-commercial low-carb web page that has links for about any question she may have. Go to:

http://www.biblelife.org/vitamins.htm

You could also print the page for her if she does not go online. However, be prepared to print 25 sheets. Another alternative is to block and copy desired sections to your word processing program for printing.

Hope it helps,

Kent
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 14:58
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
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Posts: 17,967
 
Plan: Primal
Stats: 165/149/145 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Default

Good suggestions, folks...

...but if she's just your cleaning lady, as opposed to 'close friend' or 'sister', you'll have a hard time getting through to her. She might resent you for not respecting her beliefs.

Just because I'm bored, I just *had* to <a target="_blank" href="http://www.hacres.com/home.asp">visit the Hallelujah Acres website</a>. The passage:

Then God said, "Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the surface of all the earth, and every tree which has fruit yielding seed; it shall be food for you." (Genesis 1:29)

<b>That's</b> the passage?! You have got to be kidding me!! All it says is, "eat your friggin' veggies!" It says nothing about avoiding meat!

Man, it's a total starvation diet.

The "most harmful foods" section is full of untruths. "Meat is the primary cause of adult-onset diabetes..." Since when?! The man has obviously never heard of s-u-g-a-r.

"Table salt, sodium chloride, is an inorganic sodium compound formed by the union of sodium and chlorine that is extremely toxic to the body." Oh, puh-LEEZ. My head is starting to hurt.

I don't have time right now to write to this minister-pretending-to-be-a-biochemist, but I think it would be cool to open up a can of KENT on him.

Last edited by Kristine : Mon, Aug-19-02 at 15:04.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:22
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Default

Eur J Clin Nutr 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S36-41

Meat, cancer and dietary advice to the public.

Hill M.

Nutrition Research Centre, South Bank University London, UK.

BACKGROUND: It has been claimed for many decades that meat is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, and that it has no compensating benefits in terms of cancer risk. The evidence for this has been critically reassessed. METHODS: The epidemiological evidence, particularly that produced in recent years, has been re-examined to determine whether it is sufficiently consistent to warrant giving firm advice to the general public. RESULTS: Far from being supportive, the epidemiological data does not justify this claim. A large mass of evidence is presented from case-control studies and prospective studies, in which the data from Europe are not consistent with those from the United States. This is because of the different contexts (in terms of meal composition) within which meat is consumed in different countries. In fact the epidemiological data are much more consistent with there being a protective role for fruit, vegetables and whole grain cereals and no role for meat in colorectal cancer, and a protective role in gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Meat is a good source of protein, readily available iron, calcium, magnesium, selenium, zinc and a range of B vitamins. Since the evidence for any role in colon carcinogenesis is so weak, and since such a high proportion of women of child-bearing age are iron deficient, the consumption of meat, as part of a balanced and varied diet, should be actively encouraged.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:23
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Eur J Clin Nutr 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S19-24

Meat consumption and cancer of the large bowel.

Truswell AS.

Human Nutrition, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. S.Truswell~bioch.usyd.edu.au

Since the major reviews on diet and cancer by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and by the British Department of Health's Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy (COMA) in 1997 and 1998, additional epidemiological studies relating (red) meat consumption and colorectal cancer have been published or found by search. These are collected here. Thirty adequate case-control studies have been published up to 1999 (from 16 different countries). Twenty of them found no significant association of (red) meat with colorectal cancer. Of the remaining 10 studies reporting an association, some obtained statistical significance only in rectal or colon cancers, another only in men, not women, or found a stronger association with pasta and rice, or used an inadequate food list in the food frequency questionnaire. Fifteen cohort studies have now been published. Only in three were significant associations of (red) meat found with colorectal cancer. Two of these positive studies were from the same group in the USA (relative risk 1.7). The results of the third positive study appear to conflict with data from part of the vegetarians follow up mortality study. Here, five groups of vegetarians (in three different countries) with socially matched controls were followed up (total 76 000 people). Mortality from colorectal cancer was not distinguishable between vegetarians and controls. While it is still possible that certain processed meats or sausages (with a variety of added ingredients) or meats cooked at very high temperature carry some risk, the relationship between meats in general and colorectal cancer now looks weaker than the 'probable' status it was judged to have by the WCRF in 1997.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:24
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Eur J Clin Nutr 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S2-11

Meat and cancer: meat as a component of a healthy diet.

Biesalski HK.

Department of Biological Chemistry and Nutrition, University Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. biesal~uni-hohenheim.de

Based on epidemiological studies it is assumed that meat, especially red meat, enhances risk for cancer, particularly of the colon, breast and prostate. Meat and meat products are important sources of protein, some micronutrients and fat. High fat intake has been blamed for correlation with different diseases, including cancer. Meat protein is reported to contribute to cancer formation. However, meat, including liver, is not only composed of fat and protein, it contains essential nutrients which appear exclusively in meat (vitamin A, vitamin B12) and micronutrients for which meat is the major source because of either high concentrations or better bioavailability (folate, selenium, zinc). In particular, vitamin A, folate and selenium are reported to be cancer-preventive, with respect to colon, breast and prostate cancer. Taken together, meat consists of a few, not clearly defined cancer-promoting and a lot of cancer-protecting factors. The latter can be optimized by a diet containing fruit and vegetables, which contain hundreds of more or less proven bioactive constituents, many of them showing antioxidative and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:27
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
BF:
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Nutr Cancer 2001;40(2):103-7

Meat consumption and risk of stomach cancer in Uruguay: a case-control study.

De Stefani E, Ronco A, Brennan P, Boffetta P.

Registro Nacional de Cancer, Montevideo, Uruguay.

We previously reported an association between meat intake and stomach cancer in Uruguay: in that analysis, we did not control for total energy intake. To better study the relationship between intake of meat and meat constituents and gastric cancer, we conducted a further case-control study including 123 cases and 282 controls who were enrolled between September 1997 and August 1999. Total meat intake (highest tertile) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.3-9.0]. After adjustment for total energy intake and intake of proteins and total fat by the residuals method, the OR was 1.7 (95% CI = 0.7-4.0). The energy-adjusted OR for high intake of processed meat was 1.9 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5). Intake of fried, barbecued, and salted meat and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine was not associated with risk of gastric cancer. The energy-adjusted OR of high intake of nitrosodimethylamine was 1.5 (95% CI = 0.9-2.8). These results suggest that, in a country with elevated meat consumption, total energy intake and intake of proteins and fat are powerful confounders in the relationship between meat intake and gastric cancer risk. However, a modest independent effect of meat, in particular of processed meat, is suggested.
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:28
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Posts: 475
 
Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 73%
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Int J Epidemiol 2002 Feb;31(1):78-85

Meat and dairy food consumption and breast cancer: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

Missmer SA, Smith-Warner SA, Spiegelman D, Yaun SS, Adami HO, Beeson WL, van den Brandt PA, Fraser GE, Freudenheim JL, Goldbohm RA, Graham S, Kushi LH, Miller AB, Potter JD, Rohan TE, Speizer FE, Toniolo P, Willett WC, Wolk A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Hunter DJ.

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115-6096, USA. stacey.missmer~channing.harvard.edu

BACKGROUND: More than 20 studies have investigated the relation between meat and dairy food consumption and breast cancer risk with conflicting results. Our objective was to evaluate the risk of breast cancer associated with meat and dairy food consumption and to assess whether non-dietary risk factors modify the relation. METHODS: We combined the primary data from eight prospective cohort studies from North America and Western Europe with at least 200 incident breast cancer cases, assessment of usual food and nutrient intakes, and a validation study of the dietary assessment instrument. The pooled database included 351,041 women, 7379 of whom were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during up to 15 years of follow-up. RESULTS: We found no significant association between intakes of total meat, red meat, white meat, total dairy fluids, or total dairy solids and breast cancer risk. Categorical analyses suggested a J-shaped association for egg consumption where, compared to women who did not eat eggs, breast cancer risk was slightly decreased among women who consumed < 2 eggs per week but slightly increased among women who consumed > or = 1 egg per day. CONCLUSIONS: We found no significant associations between intake of meat or dairy products and risk of breast cancer. An inconsistent relation between egg consumption and risk of breast cancer merits further investigation.
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:33
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Progress: 73%
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Nutr Rev 2001 Feb;59(2):37-47 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut


Comment in:
Nutr Rev. 2001 Nov;59(11):375-7.

Meat consumption and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic evidence.

Norat T, Riboli E.

Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

This article reviews the epidemiologic evidence on colorectal cancer risk and meat consumption from 32 case-control and 13 cohort studies published in English from 1970 to 1999 and retrieved from the Medline database. The results support the hypothesis that meat consumption is associated with a modest increase in colorectal cancer risk. This association, however, seems to have been more consistently found for red meat and processed meat. The studies on cooking methods and meat "doneness" are not consistent and the evidence is not conclusive.
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:38
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Curr Opin Urol 2001 Sep;11(5):457-61

Fat reduction to prevent prostate cancer: waiting for more evidence?
Moyad MA.

Section of Urology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0330, USA. moyad~umich.edu

Complementary medicine has become an important area of interest for patients and researchers around the world. The utilization of some of these therapies by many individuals makes it imperative to understand whether they have any role in treatment of cancer or other diseases. Some of such therapies may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Clinical trials are addressing this issue, and whether these products could also improve prognosis of prostate cancer. That dietary fat reduction may help to prevent prostate cancer is supported by numerous case-control studies reported over the past several decades, but recent prospective studies suggest that the impact of fat reduction in this regard may not be great. Clinicians should be careful not to suggest such a benefit until more research provides a better picture of the situation. Breast cancer is probably the best example of why more research into dietary changes for reduction in cancer risk is needed. Once believed to play a significant role, recent prospective studies suggest that dietary fat reduction may have little effect on breast cancer prevention, although some interesting insights have been gained with regard to the method of meat preparation and the influence of genetics. Fat reduction, together with soy products or other plant estrogen foods, may have a symbiotic relationship. Numerous healthy lifestyle changes incorporated and practiced at one time (healthy diet, attainment and maintenance of normal weight, soy consumption, among others) may hold some promise in the area of cancer prevention. In the meantime any healthy lifestyle or dietary change should be encouraged, because it may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is still the number one cause of mortality. It is also an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Regardless, complementary medicine should probably be discussed with any patient who is initiating or undergoing conventional treatment, because of the cardiovascular benefits and overall potential impact on all-cause mortality. Whether such therapies impact on prostate carcinoma remains to be determined through additional prospective investigations.
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 16:39
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Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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Progress: 73%
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Br J Cancer 2001 Aug 3;85(3):357-61

Dietary fat, cholesterol and colorectal cancer in a prospective study.

Jarvinen R, Knekt P, Hakulinen T, Rissanen H, Heliovaara M.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, Kuopio, FIN-70211, Finland.

The relationships between consumption of total fat, major dietary fatty acids, cholesterol, consumption of meat and eggs, and the incidence of colorectal cancers were studied in a cohort based on the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey. Baseline (1967-1972) information on habitual food consumption over the preceding year was collected from 9959 men and women free of diagnosed cancer. A total of 109 new colorectal cancer cases were ascertained late 1999. High cholesterol intake was associated with increased risk for colorectal cancers. The relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles of dietary cholesterol was 3.26 (95% confidence interval 1.54-6.88) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, occupation, smoking, geographic region, energy intake and consumption of vegetables, fruits and cereals. Consumption of total fat and intake of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Nonsignificant associations were found between consumption of meat and eggs and colorectal cancer risk. The results of the present study indicate that high cholesterol intake may increase colorectal cancer risk, but do not suggest the presence of significant effects of dietary fat intake on colorectal cancer incidence. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign.
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  #14   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 17:00
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Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
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J Epidemiol 1999 Aug;9(4):275-84

Factor analysis of digestive cancer mortality and food consumption in 65 Chinese counties.

Zhuo XG, Watanabe S.

Department of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Applied Bioscience, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Japan.

Dietary factors were analyzed for the regional difference of GI tract cancer mortality rates in China. Sixty-five rural counties were selected among a total of 2,392 counties to represent a range of rates for seven most prevalent cancers. The dietary data in the selected 65 counties were obtained by three-day dietary record of households in 1983. The four digestive cancer mortality rates (annual cases per 100,000 standardized truncated rates for ages 35-64) and per capita food consumption were analyzed by the principal components factor analysis. Esophageal cancer was associated with poor area, dietary pattern rich in starchy tubers, and salt, lack of consumption of meat , eggs, vegetables and rice. Stomach cancer seemed to be less associated with diet in this study because of its small model Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy, suggesting some other carcinogenic factors would play more important role in the development of this cancer in China. The colon and rectal cancer showed close relation to diet; rich in sea vegetables, eggs, soy sauce, meat and fish, while lacking in consumption of milk and dairy products. Rapeseed oil was more important risk factor for colon cancer than that of rectum. Rice, processed starch and sugar were closely associated with colon cancer, supporting the insulin/colon cancer hypothesis.
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Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 17:01
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Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
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BMJ 1999 Jul 17;319(7203):187-8

Diet and the prevention of cancer. No evidence has linked ovarian cancer with high intakes of fat and meat.

Gurr MI.
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