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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Jul-27-02, 09:10
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Voyajer Voyajer is offline
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Default Do Asian Countries Benefit from Eating Rice?

The Japanese, and Asians in general, have much higher rates of of cancer of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas and liver.38 Asians throughout the world also have high rates of thyroid cancer.39

Lack of saturated fat and animal protein causes a high incidence of stroke in Asian countries. See study below.

The Japanese have 2 to 3 times a higher rate of stroke (cerebrovascular disease) and a higher rate of cancer (malignant neoplasms) than the United States. See:

http://www3.who.int/whosis/whsa/whs...anguage=english

38. Harras, Angela (ed.), Cancer Rates and Risks, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 1996, 4th edition.
39. Searle, Charles E. (ed.), Chemical Carcinogens, ACS Monograph 173, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 1976.

Circulation 2001 Feb 13;103(6):856-63

Prospective study of fat and protein intake and risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage in women.

Iso H, Stampfer MJ, Manson JE, Rexrode K, Hu F, Hennekens CH, Colditz GA, Speizer FE, Willett WC.

Channing Laboratory, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

BACKGROUND:-Dietary animal fat and protein have been inversely associated with a risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage in ecological studies. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1980, 85 764 women in the Nurses' Health Study cohort, who were 34 to 59 years old and free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease and cancer, completed dietary questionnaires. From these questionnaires, we calculated fat and protein intake. By 1994, after 1.16 million person-years of follow-up, 690 incident strokes, including 74 intraparenchymal hemorrhages, had been documented. Multivariate-adjusted risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage was higher among women in the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted saturated fat intake than at all higher levels of intake (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% CI, 1.10 to 5.09; P:=0.03). For trans unsaturated fat, the corresponding RR was 2.50 (95% CI, 1.35 to 4.65; P:=0.004). Animal protein intake was inversely associated with risk (RR in the highest versus lowest quintiles, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.10 to 1.00; P:=0.04). The excess risk associated with low saturated fat intake was observed primarily among women with a history of hypertension (RR, 3.66; 95% CI, 1.09 to 12.3; P=0.04), but such an interaction was not seen for trans unsaturated fat or animal protein. These nutrients were not related to risk of other stroke subtypes. Dietary cholesterol and monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat were not related to risk of any stroke subtype. CONCLUSIONS: Low intake of saturated fat and animal protein was associated with an increased risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage, which may help to explain the high rate of this stroke subtype in Asian countries. The increased risk with low intake of saturated fat and trans unsaturated fat is compatible with the reported association between low serum total cholesterol and risk.

Last edited by Voyajer : Sat, Jul-27-02 at 14:01.
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Old Mon, Jul-29-02, 15:13
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In general, the modern Chinese diet does not protect them against cancer. The overall rate of cancer in China is twice that of the United States. The Chinese have less cancer of the colon, lung and breast, but far greater levels esophageal, stomach and liver cancer. Heart disease mortality is greater in the US but the Chinese have more stroke—in some districts the rate of death by stroke for those under 65 is as high as 8 percent. While the Chinese have made great strides in reducing the incidence of infectious disease and rates of infant mortality, these still remain major public health problems, especially in areas that are either crowded or remote. TB and parasite infections remain common.

Of particular concern is the high rate of mental retardation—over ten million cases in China, including hundreds of thousands with overt cretinism, especially in the central regions.11 This is blamed on a lack of iodine and the United Nations has called for a World-Bank-financed campaign to iodize salt in China. This will help the Chinese government eliminate the thriving black market in salt, but as Chinese salt is already rich in iodine, it is not likely to solve the problem. Another explanation is the blinding poverty of the region, where each village sports a population of “idiots” whose families can afford to eat nothing more that wheat porridge.


http://www.westonaprice.org/traditi...d_in_china.html
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Old Mon, Jul-29-02, 15:19
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THE JAPANESE PARADOX
The Japanese suffered greatly before and during World War II. There were many food shortages, particularly of fats and animal foods. TB was common. Many Japanese lived almost entirely on rice during the war.

It was during the postwar years that the American researcher Ancel Keys wrote his famous Seven Countries Study in which he included groups from the Japanese districts of Tanushimaru and Ushibuka. He noted that the Japanese in these two regions had very low levels of serum cholesterol, consumed a diet extremely low in saturated fat and cholesterol and had low rates of coronary heart disease. It was primarily the Japanese data that allowed Keys and others to conclude that consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol caused heart disease.

Keys has been criticized for omitting from his study many areas of the world where consumption of animal foods is high and deaths from heart attack are low, including France. This is the so-called French paradox, one of many. But there is also a Japanese paradox. In 1989, Japanese scientists returned to the same two districts that Keys had studied. In “Lessons for Science from the Seven Countries Study,”15 they noted that per capita consumption of rice had declined while consumption of fats, oils, meats, poultry, dairy products and fruit had all increased. Between 1958 and 1989, protein intake rose from 11 percent of calories to about 15 percent and fat intake rose from a scanty 5 percent to over 20 percent. Mean cholesterol levels increased from 150 in 1958 to 188 in 1989. During the period, mean body mass gradually increased, with overweight rising from 8 percent to about 13 percent of the population. High blood pressure became more common while the percentage of smokers decreased from 69 percent in 1958 to 55 percent in 1989.

During the postwar period of improved nutrition the Japanese average height increased three inches and the age-adjusted death rate from all causes declined from 17.6 to 7.4 per 1000 per year. Although the rates of hypertension increased, stroke mortality declined markedly. Deaths from cancer also went down in spite of the increased use of animal foods.

The researchers also noted—and here is the paradox—that the rate of myocardial infarction (heart attack) and sudden death did not change during this period, in spite of the fact that the Japanese weighed more, had higher blood pressure and higher cholesterol, and ate more fat, more beef and more dairy.

http://www.westonaprice.org/traditi...iets/japan.html
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