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dws1119
Fri, Apr-22-05, 17:19
Being from the south, I love good baked goods. I've never cared for carbquick or the atkins bake mixes. I don't remember where I found this but I keep it made all the time. I use it just like you would bisquick. I make pancakes, biscuits, pot pies, even fruit cobblers with it. Hope ya'll use it as much as I do.

5 c almond flour
2/3 c whey protein
3 Tbsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
2 Tbsp splenda, granular
2 tsp salt
1 c lard :idea: (if you watch your transfats use butter)

Mix all dry ingredients together. Sift them if you have one. If not, just mix up well with a wire whisk. It does the same thing. Break in lard :idea: (or butter) until it looks like coarse meal. Store in airtight container. I keep mine in the freezer.

Deja_Vue
Fri, May-20-05, 14:19
I made a copy of your fake Bisquick recipe and wonder ..have yu ever tried this with dumplings as in chicken and dumplings...being a southern also..this is one of the things I miss..

I'm anxious to try this mix in various recipes..

Kristine
Sat, May-21-05, 09:14
Thanks for this recipe. I don't have Carbquick available, and I'm suspicious of what they do to the wheat. At least I know what's in this. :thup:

The wheat protein... that's "wheat protein isolate", right?

greannmhar
Sat, May-21-05, 20:03
Is it really 3 TABLESPOONS of Baking Powder? That seems like a lot, but then I never used Bisquik before.
Babs

deb34
Tue, May-24-05, 12:10
:q: Kristine:

What is Wheat Protein isolate? and where can i get it? I'm in Toronto but i don't know any good brands or anything...i ususally shop for LC stuff at the bulk food store.

Thanks

deb

P.S foldks i just answered my own question and found a super reliable source that i've used before that supplies canadian LC consumers..

if anyone is interested, here's the link

http://members.shaw.ca/jjm_vandenbroek/LCFE.htm

dws1119
Tue, May-24-05, 16:28
Sorry everyone. The recipe is suppose to read WHEY protein isolate. It is the unflavored protein supplement. It is suppose to be 3 TBS baking powder. It will act as a binding agent also, like Wise Choice cake ability.

As for the uses: Any recipe calling for a baking mix can use this.
I make cobblers, pancakes, waffles, chicken pot pies and YES even dumplings.
As for where I buy it. I guess you could try GNC. I am a gastric bypass surgery patient, so I buy it at the hospital pharmacy where I had surgery.
Many don't realize, but we HAVE to follow a LC WOE after surgery. I eat the same way ya'll do, just smaller amts.
Kristine--the one thing I have learned this last year, I do better cooking from scratch. I like to know just what I'm eating. I filled my body with way too many processed foods for too long. Even though I LOVE to cook, being single, it was easier to just GRAB SOMETHING QUICK. I've worked out a compromise. I cook for my parents and sister throughout the week. When I do, I make TV dinners for me. That way I am not tempted to just grab something, for the sake of convience.

deb34
Fri, May-27-05, 08:16
The recipe is suppose to read WHEY protein isolate.

Is there any way that the WPI Wheat protein isolate could be fit into this recipe somehow? :help:

I'm not clever enough to figure this out myself. Could an experienced LC baker modify this for me?

Thanks for your help...

Deb

Kristine
Mon, May-30-05, 07:16
Is there any way that the WPI Wheat protein isolate could be fit into this recipe somehow? :help:

I think wheat protein isolate might make it gummy. If I remember correctly, it's very high in gluten, which is what gives flour its stringy/thickening properties. If you want to use up wheat protein isolate, you should be able to substitute it for any recipe calling for gluten flour (aka vital wheat gluten). Gluten flour is 80% protein. I've never seen wheat protein isolate, but I use a fair bit of gluten flour. Deb, since you're in Tee-Oh, you can get it at Bulk Barn. :cool: Come to think of it, Bulk Barn is a must-visit when stocking your LC kitchen: you can get gluten flour, soy flour, bran, ground almonds aka almond 'flour', cocoa, unsweetened chocolate, spices, flax seeds, nuts, nut butters...

PS - I edited the original post so no one jots it down without scrolling down to see the correction. :) Thanks again for the recipe, Diane - I'm going to try it as soon as I make room for it in my freezer. Congratulations not only on losing weight, but establishing a healthy home-cooking habit. :thup: Ain't cooking fun?

PML
Fri, Jun-03-05, 07:22
...
As for the uses: Any recipe calling for a baking mix can use this.
I make cobblers, pancakes, waffles, chicken pot pies and YES even dumplings.
...

Diane,

Thanks so much for the recipe! Just a few questions to make sure I understand correctly... you use this baking mix in ANY recipe that calls for a baking mix? Including recipes calling for the high carb baking mixes? Can it be used to make rolled doughs (like for a pie crust for chicken pot pie or a rolled pasta "like" dumpling for chicken and dumplings) or is it just good for "drop" crusts and dumplings?

My husband loves my chicken pot pie and I would love to make it for him more often but it is difficult for me to resist. If I could roll a crust for myself, I would make it for him more often.

I also love chicken and dumplings and would love to enjoy them again. But I don't like the thick "doughy" dumplings that are so common in southern home cooking... never did, even though that is what I grew up with. My family knew this awesome Chef that worked at the Ramada Inn in Beaumont, Texas and he made the most fabulous chicken and dumplings. He shared his secret... broken up lasagne noodles... cooked until they start falling apart. Fabulous!!!! But I would have to be able to roll the dough and cut it out into a pasta noodle shape to simulate this dish.

Thanks so much for sharing this recipe!

Phyllis

dixiegal99
Fri, Jun-03-05, 07:56
Did someone say Chicken 'n Dumplings? :yum: I'm in!! I will try to locate this items in my area, I wonder how the biscuits are??? Thanks for the recipe!

greannmhar
Sat, Jun-04-05, 07:52
I would really love to use this recipe to make some dumplings or pancakes but I have never used Bisquick before (I don't think it was ever sold here in Ireland?).
I'd be so grateful if someone could write out, or point me to, a recipe I could use for this mix, either pancakes or dumplings.
Thanks - and thanks to Diane for the recipe :)
Babs

PML
Sat, Jun-04-05, 16:15
I would really love to use this recipe to make some dumplings or pancakes but I have never used Bisquick before (I don't think it was ever sold here in Ireland?).
I'd be so grateful if someone could write out, or point me to, a recipe I could use for this mix, either pancakes or dumplings.
Thanks - and thanks to Diane for the recipe :)
Babs

Babs,

Bisquick and other baking mixes are just flour with leavening added in... a little baking soda, salt, oil, and dextrose... so, technically, you could use Bisquick with any recipe that calls for flour and leavening... or even one that doesn't call for leavening, for that matter, it would just rise or "puff" up a bit.

Assuming that this bake mix recipe can be used in place of Bisquick (or Pioneer or other baking mix), I can give you the recipes on the bisquick box. You could also go to Bisquick.com... they probably have tons of recipes on their site.


Pancakes: 2 cups Bisquick, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs

Stir until blended. Pour by slightly less than 1/4 cupfuls onto hot greased griddle. Cook until edges are dry. Turn; cook until golden. Makes 14 pancakes.

For thinner pancakes: use 1 1/2 cups milk.
For melt in your mouth pancakes: Stir in 1 T. sugar, 2 T. lemon juice and 2 t. baking powder.

(Personally, I like my batter a little thinner so I add a little more milk until it looks right... but adding as much as an additional 1/2 cup is too thin for my tastes.)


Dumplings: 2 cups Bisquick Mix, 2/3 cup milk

Stir ingredients until soft dough forms. Drop by spoonfuls onto boiling stew; reduce heat. Cook uncovered 10 minutes. Cover and cook 10 minutes. Makes 10 dumplings.

(This is the kind of dumpling that I don't like, although many people do,... big balls of chewy dough... ick... )

There are other recipes printed on the box; you can probably find all of these on their web site.


Phyllis

greannmhar
Sun, Jun-05-05, 06:32
Thanks a million, Phyllis! I am going to try your recipes this week, especially the dumplings. I used to make herby ones that included suet and mixed herbs, but I used water not milk, so I will try that. I really miss my spuds when I have stews or casseroles, so I am sooooo looking forward to dumplings - mmmmmmmmmmm, chewy dough (doh!).
For the pancakes, I may try either watered-down cream or soy milk to keep the carbs low. I have recently obtained freeze dried blueberries and raspberries, too - double mmmmmmm!
Babs

PML
Sun, Jun-05-05, 09:50
You are welcome, Babs. After I left the post I went to the bisquick web site and found that they do have many recipes. I always sub 1/2 cream and 1/2 water for milk... unless you can get Hood's Carb Countdown milk. If you miss potatoes with your stews and soups... I like to add radishes in place of the potatoes. (Depending on the size I leave them whole or cut in half.) By the time they cook, all of the red, and bite, is gone and they give you a "potato" mouth feel to your soups and stews. Of course, you could also use turnips or rutabagas (sp?) but I find they retain more of their own flavor. The radishes take on the flavor of the soup/stew and still give you that mouth feel. Just a thought.

Phyllis

greannmhar
Sun, Jun-05-05, 10:11
I never thought to use radishes - must give them a go now that you say the 'bite' goes after cooking. I have tried all the myriad versions of cauli mash, too and hated every one - plus it seems to have a poly belly effect on me, too!
Turnips, or swedes as we call them, are fine as 'turnips', but trying to make them into something dry, bland and floury like the spuds we eat here in Ireland is a wasted effort.
Thankfully, I can order Dreamfields on the net, so I can have pasta a couple of times a week. I heard they were working on a potato sub ages ago, but no sign yet. The new season's potatoes (gorgeous) will be available here soon - pre-diabetes, I could eat just spuds and butter for my dinner!
Thanks again for your help - I will let you know how I get on.
Babs

PML
Wed, Jun-08-05, 10:18
Babs, I know what you mean... I LOVE potatoes! Too bad they don't love me. :( I'm with you... pre lc I could eat nothing but potatoes (or rice cooked in real chicken broth) for a meal.

If mashed cauliflower gives you intestinal distress, you may not want to try this... but... I have found that the secret to making mashed cauliflower is to get as much water out as possible and mix in good amounts of cream cheese with some sour cream. I use a potato ricer to squeeze all the water out of the cauliflower... then I put it along with butter, salt, pepper, sour cream, and cream cheese (and sometimes carmelized onion and roasted garlic) into my food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. This base also makes an awesome mock cream of potato soup when you add sauteed onion, garlic, and celery along with chicken broth.

Mmmm. that makes me hungry for mashed cauliflower and mock potato soup... gotta go get some cauliflower!

Phyllis

greannmhar
Wed, Jun-08-05, 18:09
I'll give that a go, Phyllis, thanks - you're right about the excess water. Something I did try a while back was add some real potato and some turnip to the mix. This worked quite well to dry it up and really wasn't too carby when divided into portions.
I'm going to try the radishes tomorrow - DH is acting very dubious, as he's afraid they'll destroy the taste of the stew. Gonna make herb dumplings, too .... yum, yum!
Babs

PML
Thu, Jun-09-05, 06:17
I'll give that a go, Phyllis, thanks - you're right about the excess water. Something I did try a while back was add some real potato and some turnip to the mix. This worked quite well to dry it up and really wasn't too carby when divided into portions.
I'm going to try the radishes tomorrow - DH is acting very dubious, as he's afraid they'll destroy the taste of the stew. Gonna make herb dumplings, too .... yum, yum!
Babs

If your husband is worried about the radishes... just use a few the first time so you can see how you/he likes them.

If you can get your hands on a potato ricer, try that for the mased cauliflower. The cauliflower has to be tender enough to be able to squeeze our as much water as possible... but... not so tender that it actually squeezes through the ricer holes, otherwise it rices and you are still stuck with all the water. I wouldn't worry too much, though, you really have to over cook it to get it so tender that it will squeeze through the smallest hole plate.

Let me know how you and your husband like the radishes... and how the herb dumplings turn out.

Have a great weekend,

Phyllis

greannmhar
Thu, Jun-09-05, 07:45
Too late - all the radishes are in the slow cooker ;) The ones I got were very small - like wee marbles, so I didn't peel them and just fired them all in.
I've made up the dry mix for the dumplings using the remains of a bakemix that I'd made up last week (from Jennifer Eloff, sweety.com). I am soooooo looking forward to it all - I'll report back later tonight (it's 2.44 PM here now and dinner will be at 8).
Babs

greannmhar
Thu, Jun-09-05, 07:49
PS - I will look out for a potato ricer, although I usually use a stick blender. If I introduce one more gadget into my kitchen, DH says he is moving out!
Babs

greannmhar
Thu, Jun-09-05, 19:10
Update - the dumplings were just ok, maybe because of the gluten flour in the bakemix I used. They were a bit dense and not floury like the real thing. Perhaps the mix on this thread would be better.
The radishes were great - no bite at all and they really looked like wee spuds - they went white as they cooked. I wish I could say they tasted like spuds, too, but they absorbed the stew flavour as you said, Phyllis. I would have them again - NOT the dumplings, though :(
Babs

PML
Fri, Jun-10-05, 08:35
Babs,

I had planned to respond in your journal (so we don't continue to clutter the Fake Bisquick thread) but I discovered that you don't have a journal. So, I posted a response for you in my journal. Here is a link to the entry: Response (http://forum.lowcarber.org/showpost.php?p=5329902&postcount=91)

Phyllis

dianeParks
Tue, Aug-02-05, 09:58
does anyone know where i can get this powder in the USA...
thanks Diane

Kristine
Mon, Aug-08-05, 18:37
Which powder?

datahamstr
Tue, Aug-30-05, 01:05
I'm on a very limited budget, so I'm wondering if the "Fake Bisquick Mix" works well, like could be used instead of Carquick, in a recipe that called for it?
Would love to try it!
Datahamstr :yum:

Kristine
Tue, Aug-30-05, 07:03
I think it depends on the recipe. Because this recipe is almond-based, it's not going to have any gluten, whereas the Carbquick will. Carbquick would be better if you wanted a stretchy, glutenous texture, like a pizza dough or pastry-type pie crust. This homemade recipe would be fine for crumb-type crusts, scones, coffee cake and other products where you'd expect a more crumbly consistancy than a doughy one.

I'd like to experiment with it... eventually. I'm on a tight budget right now. Maybe try adding some gluten flour to split the difference. :idea:

IslandGirl
Mon, Sep-05-05, 12:53
I think it depends on the recipe. Because this recipe is almond-based, it's not going to have any gluten, whereas the Carbquick will. Carbquick would be better if you wanted a stretchy, glutenous texture, like a pizza dough or pastry-type pie crust. This homemade recipe would be fine for crumb-type crusts, scones, coffee cake and other products where you'd expect a more crumbly consistancy than a doughy one.

I'd like to experiment with it... eventually. I'm on a tight budget right now. Maybe try adding some gluten flour to split the difference. :idea:

Actually, you don't want much gluten in a pastry-type crust, you want 'flakes', which you get from (ahem) fat pockets and steam trapped between cooking (solidifying) starch layers.

Also, to get a 'floury' taste, you need a wheat product of some kind...I haven't tried dumplings yet (with ANY bakemix combo), but I have got some very delicate pastry out of Wheat Protein Isolate...this is where it gets messy though, because there are 3 kinds of WPI, and only 2 of them act gluten-ous, have that stretchy quality you get from Vital Wheat Gluten. One of them acts MUCH more like Whey Protein Isolate in baking, it's been processed differently...and this is the one that's been available the longest and originally from Steph (?) in upper New York State, original owner of www.locarb.com...I think. The WPI from Honeyville grain is quite gluten-ous, it's original intention was to be used in bread making where lots of gluten is useful.

Yikes

IslandGirl
Mon, Sep-05-05, 13:03
I just posted a "5-Minute Chocolate Cake" recipe in the Bowl Muffins thread right here in this Kitchen/Baked Goods forum, that uses both WPI and ground almonds in equal measure as the flour (cakes don't need much gluten-ous stretchy stuff either, think of cake/pastry flour which is low-protein).

Enjoy.

dws1119
Mon, Nov-21-05, 13:03
1... you use this baking mix in ANY recipe that calls for a baking mix? Including recipes calling for the high carb baking mixes? Can it be used to make rolled doughs (like for a pie crust for chicken pot pie or a rolled pasta "like" dumpling for chicken and dumplings) or is it just good for "drop" crusts and dumplings?

2...I also love chicken and dumplings and would love to enjoy them again. But I don't like the thick "doughy" dumplings that are so common in southern home cooking... never did, even though that is what I grew up with.
Phyllis

Sorry I haven't checked this in awhile.....

anything you can make with bisquick---you can make with this--the pie dough is good in my opinion just make sure all your ingredients are VERY COLD when you mix it and don't work it too much and refridgerate before trying to roll out.

many people don't like the doughy dumplings but here is a trick for thin noodle like dumplings without any work--LC tortillias!!! just cut them up in small sections and drop in your boiling broth--try the la tortilla factory brand rosemary flavored for a real treat.

abcxyz
Wed, Jan-04-06, 18:51
hello!

i'm not actually doing a low carb diet, but a similar one to fight a disease i have. starch is the main problem ingredient. i really miss pancakes/waffles and such, this recipe looks great, especially from all the great things everyone has said about it.


i was wondering if there was a non-starchy whey protein substitute. (i know whey is starchy, so the whey protein must be as well right?)

also, is it ok to substitute regular sugar for the splenda? i don't need artificial sweetener.


any ideas/feedback would be a big help!
thanks everyone!

IslandGirl
Thu, Jan-05-06, 12:40
hello!

i'm not actually doing a low carb diet, but a similar one to fight a disease i have. starch is the main problem ingredient. i really miss pancakes/waffles and such, this recipe looks great, especially from all the great things everyone has said about it.


i was wondering if there was a non-starchy whey protein substitute. (i know whey is starchy, so the whey protein must be as well right?)

also, is it ok to substitute regular sugar for the splenda? i don't need artificial sweetener.


any ideas/feedback would be a big help!
thanks everyone!

In my opinion (and probably everybody here :)) nobody needs sugar...but I see no reason why you can't substitute it if you must.

As for the starchy question, whey protein isolate has zero starch, and wheat protein isolate has very close to zero starch. Were you thinking of vital wheat gluten maybe? It has a very little amount of starch. We don't DO starch here... :lol:

abcxyz
Thu, Jan-05-06, 14:33
thanks for your reply! i really didn't know if whey protein isolate was starchy or not. i read that whey was starchy because it is a product of corn and assumed that WPI would most likely be starchy as well. i'm glad that i'm wrong :). about the sugar, i would rather use the real/natural thing whenever possible (especially since many artificial sweeteners have been found to be not safe, or at best controversial)


:devil: DOWN WITH STARCH!! :devil:

kevinpa
Thu, Jan-05-06, 15:33
thanks for your reply! i really didn't know if whey protein isolate was starchy or not. i read that whey was starchy because it is a product of corn and assumed that WPI would most likely be starchy as well. i'm glad that i'm wrong :). about the sugar, i would rather use the real/natural thing whenever possible (especially since many artificial sweeteners have been found to be not safe, or at best controversial)


:devil: DOWN WITH STARCH!! :devil:

again you won't get many here to agree with you about sugar and BTW there is nothing natural about granulate proccessed sugar.

Read the book Sugar Blues sometime.

Kristine
Thu, Jan-05-06, 15:44
Refined sugar: the original artificial sweetener. :)

kevinpa
Thu, Jan-05-06, 15:51
What Are Sugars And Starches (http://shop.store.yahoo.com/carbsmart/whataresugars.html)?

The Sugars
The simple sugars in foods that are most important to human nutrition are called sucrose, fructose, lactose, and maltose. But the body wants the simple sugar called glucose, so these other simple sugars break apart in the body to become glucose. They do this by coming apart easily at the water connections.



The Starches

Now, let's talk about starches. Starches include such foods as potatoes, cereals, wheat and other grains, and rice. A few paragraphs above, we talked about mono-saccharides and poly-saccharides. Mono-saccharides are the simple sugars. Poly-saccharides are the complex sugars. Starches are complex sugars, and complex sugars break down into one of the simple sugars (maltose), and then to glucose by (you guessed it!) easily breaking apart at the water connections.

IslandGirl
Fri, Jan-06-06, 12:15
thanks for your reply! i really didn't know if whey protein isolate was starchy or not. i read that whey was starchy because it is a product of corn and assumed that WPI would most likely be starchy as well. i'm glad that i'm wrong :). about the sugar, i would rather use the real/natural thing whenever possible (especially since many artificial sweeteners have been found to be not safe, or at best controversial)


:devil: DOWN WITH STARCH!! :devil:

By the way, whey does not come from corn (the sugar dextrose is processed from corn, however). Whey comes from milk.

And if you want the real, natural thing when it comes to sugar, avoid refined/processed sugar at all costs. I.e., if it's white, it's NOT natural. Just because it's become a "normal" product in western society and in the last hundred years or so, does NOT make it natural.

Finally, if you're missing digestive enzymes to break down starch (complex carbohydrates) into sugar, there are simple ways of dealing with these issues, ranging from a simple digestive enzyme purchased from the health food store, to the simplest of all, avoiding simple and processed carbohydrates and sticking to low- or no-carbohydrate vegetables in your diet.

abcxyz
Fri, Jan-06-06, 13:41
By the way, whey does not come from corn (the sugar dextrose is processed from corn, however). Whey comes from milk.

And if you want the real, natural thing when it comes to sugar, avoid refined/processed sugar at all costs. I.e., if it's white, it's NOT natural. Just because it's become a "normal" product in western society and in the last hundred years or so, does NOT make it natural.

Finally, if you're missing digestive enzymes to break down starch (complex carbohydrates) into sugar, there are simple ways of dealing with these issues, ranging from a simple digestive enzyme purchased from the health food store, to the simplest of all, avoiding simple and processed carbohydrates and sticking to low- or no-carbohydrate vegetables in your diet.


i know the white stuff isn't natural, but isn't there a sugar you can get that is a brownish yellow color that is natural?

LadyBelle
Fri, Jan-06-06, 17:24
You can get many forms of natural sweetners that are much better then refined sugar if you don't like the thought of artificial sweetners

Stevia- This is a natural herb sweetner that is much more powerful then sugar or artificial sweetners. It is not sold as a sweetner in the US, rather as a suppliment due to FDA. In asia and other countries it is used as a sweetner quite a bit. Hard to work with, but 100% natural and without the bad effects of sugar

Honey, unsweetened apple sauce, turbanado sugar, agave and others are also unprocessed sugars. Some are dextrose and some are fructose. They can still cause problems with blood sugar and onset of type II diabities, but they are a better alternative to processed, white sugar.

The bad ones - refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup - These have been proven in many studies to have negative long term effects. While artificial sweetners may or may not have issues, these two have been proven many times to have negative impact on health.

abcxyz
Sat, Jan-07-06, 01:43
where would i buy whey protein isolate? i went to the grocery store today and they only had whey protein shake mixes. is that the same thing that the recipe calls for, or can you buy pure whey protein isolate? if so, where would i find it?

thanks!

kevinpa
Sat, Jan-07-06, 02:22
I buy mine online here:
http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=622

greannmhar
Sun, Jan-08-06, 08:14
Kevin, that link is for wheat protein isolate (as opposed to whey protein isolate) - have you used this wheat PI in anything? I've never seen it here and would love to know whether it's worth trying to get some, especially for bread recipes. Does it have the same 'whang' that vital wheat gluten has?
Babs

kevinpa
Sun, Jan-08-06, 08:43
oops! nevermind(in my best gilda radner impression)

yes I have used the WPI 5000 and have an order in for the WPI 8000.

I sub the WPI 5000 for whey protein in my muffins.

IslandGirl
Sun, Jan-08-06, 10:55
where would i buy whey protein isolate? i went to the grocery store today and they only had whey protein shake mixes. is that the same thing that the recipe calls for, or can you buy pure whey protein isolate? if so, where would i find it?

thanks!

Most whey protein shake mixes come in two basic kinds, those WITH sugars added (high carb) and those without (low carb). You have to read the ingredient list, but that is how most WHEY Protein Isolate protein powder comes, in a "shake" or "drink" mix or "supplement", in a large can, in health food stores, drugstores and pharmacies and even grocery stores. You can always ask the staff, they usually want to help.

It often comes flavored. For baking, it's easiest to look for "Unflavored" or "Natural".

Please take this the right way, but a lot of "beginner" and basic questions are answered in the Newbies' Questions
http://forum.lowcarber.org/forumdisplay.php?f=110 <-----
forum, for the lat 5 years or more these same questions are asked by anybody exploring low carb. It's CHOCK full of valuable information you may want to browse, rather than having those kinds of questions in this Bread & Baked Goods:Fake Bisquick recipe thread.

Hope this helps.

IslandGirl
Sun, Jan-08-06, 10:56
Kevin, that link is for wheat protein isolate (as opposed to whey protein isolate) - have you used this wheat PI in anything? I've never seen it here and would love to know whether it's worth trying to get some, especially for bread recipes. Does it have the same 'whang' that vital wheat gluten has?
Babs

What's a "whang"? And there's tons of discussion on Wheat Protein Isolate in the Kitchen Talk forum.....

greannmhar
Sun, Jan-08-06, 12:52
Ermmmmmm, a 'whang' is like a cross between a taste and a smell - I find gluten flour to have an odd ..... 'je ne sais quoi' flavour that the word 'whang' seems to fit :). Carbalose has a peculiar 'whang' too - it has to be covered up with spices and flavourings.
OK, enough digression on this thread - I promise to shut up now(here anyway)!
Babs

YukonRose
Sat, Jun-07-08, 12:28
I have found that the secret to making mashed cauliflower is to get as much water out as possible and mix in good amounts of cream cheese with some sour cream. I use a potato ricer to squeeze all the water out of the cauliflower... then I put it along with butter, salt, pepper, sour cream, and cream cheese (and sometimes carmelized onion and roasted garlic) into my food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. This base also makes an awesome mock cream of potato soup when you add sauteed onion, garlic, and celery along with chicken broth.

Phyllis

I also use a potato ricer to get the water out of the cauliflower, then kind of mash the results with my hands. I really cook the cauliflower (10 mins in microwave for one head of cauliflower), so it mashes easily. I was really suprised how much water was in the cooked cauliflower.

If one doesn't have a ricer, I wonder if you could squeeze a lot of the water out in your hands? I haven't tried that...

Dahn